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News Flash: Physicians Still Very Dissatisfied With EMRs

Posted on October 18, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Anyone who reads this blog knows that many physicians still aren’t convinced that the big industry-wide EMR rollout was a good idea. But nonetheless, I was still surprised to learn — as you might be as well — that in the aggregate, physicians thoroughly dislike pretty much all of the ambulatory EMRs commonly used in medical practices today.

This conclusion, along with several other interesting factoids, comes from a new report from healthcare research firm peer60. The report is based on a survey from the firm conducted in August of this year, reaching out to 1,053 doctors in various specialties.

Generally speaking, the peer60 study found that EMR market for acute care facilities is consolidating quickly, and that Epic continues to add market share in the ambulatory EMR market (Although, it’s possible that’s also survey bias).  In fact, 50% of respondents reported using an Epic system, followed by 21% Cerner, 9% Allscripts and 4% the military EMR VistA.  Not surprisingly, respondents reporting Epic use accounted for 55% of hospitals with 751+ beds, but less predictably, a full 59% of hospitals of up to 300 beds were Epic shops as well. (For an alternate look at acute care EMR market share, check out the stats on systems with the highest number of certified users.)

When it came to which EMR the physician used in their own practice, however, the market looks a lot tighter. While 18% of respondents said they used Epic, 7% reported using Allscripts, 6% eClinicalWorks, 5% Cerner, 4% athenahealth, e-MDs and NextGen, 3% Greenway and Practice Fusion and 2% GE Healthcare. Clearly, have remained open to a far greater set of choices than hospitals. And that competition is likely to remain robust, as few practices seem to be willing to change to competitor systems — in fact, only 9% said they were interested in switching at present.

To me, where the report got particularly interesting was when peer60 offered data on the “net promoter scores” for some of the top vendors. The net promoter score method it uses is simple: it subtracts the percent of physicians who wouldn’t recommend an EMR from the percent who would recommend that EMR to get a number from 100 to -100. And obviously, if lots of physicians reported that they wouldn’t recommend a product the NPS fell into the negative.

While the report declines to name which NPS is associated with which vendor, it’s clear that virtually none have anything to write home about here. All but one of the NPS ratings were below zero, and one was rated at a nasty -73. The best NPS among the ambulatory care vendors was a 5, which as I read it suggests that either physicians feel they can tolerate it or simply believe the rest of the crop of competitors are even worse.

Clearly, something is out of order across the entire ambulatory EMR industry if a study like this — which drew on a fairly large number of respondents cutting across most hospital sizes and specialties — suggests that doctors are so unhappy with what they have. According to the report, the biggest physician frustrations are poor EMR usability and a lack of desired functionality, so what are we waiting for? Let’s get this right! The EMR revolution will never bear fruit if so many doctors are so frustrated with the tools they have.

KLAS Names Top EMR Vendors For Mid-Sized Practices

Posted on January 27, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new report by KLAS has designated Epic, athenahealth and Greenway as the top three EMR vendors among mid-sized healthcare practices.  The report, which also identified unpopular EMRs in the space, drew its conclusions based on analysis of ability, workflow and integration capabilities, according to iHealthBeat.

To do the study, KLAS interviewed clinicians and IT personnel at practices with 11 to 75 doctors.

Researchers named the top three mid-sized EMR vendors as Epic Systems, which scored a 85.3 points out of 100; athenahealth, which scored 83.5 points; and Greenway, which scored 81.3 points.

Each of the top three vendors distinguished themselves in unique ways.  For example, researchers found that practices liked Epic’s consistent delivery in large hospital-based practices, athenahealth’s “nimble deployment” and system updates, and Greenway’s exceptional service to smaller, independent practices.

Meanwhile, KLAS noted that Allscripts, McKesson and Vitera had the highest percentage of dissatisfied customers, practices which felt stuck with their current EMR system but would not purchase it again.  Reasons for their dissatisfaction included upgrade issues, lack of support, and a perceived lack of vendor partnership, iHealthBeat said.

When it comes down to it, it’s pretty clear when these practices need from their vendors, and a feeling of partnership and mutual support seems to top the list of matter which researchers is doing the study.  But it’s clear that these characteristics can be pretty hard to come by, even from companies you’d think had plenty of resources to deliver a sense of support and availability to their customers.  Allscripts, McKesson and Vitera (although it is Greenway now) had better get their act together quickly, as mid-sized medical practices are a major market, even if they don’t spend quite as much as hospitals.

EHR Appointment Type’s the Headwaters of Workflow

Posted on January 8, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

It’s a rare EHR that doesn’t include scheduling an appointment’s time and purpose. Usually, there’s a line for the patient, which doctor and an appointment type. Patient and doctor are straight forward, but practices may not take advantage of what appointment type can do for them.

Even having meaningful types can be difficult. One practice I worked with just wanted minutes as appointment types, 15, 30, etc. That took a while to work through, but we finally settled on Initial, Pre Op, etc., which made tracking their work a little more meaningful.

Many EHRs leave the subject at having categories or adding insurance requirements. Other EHRs do more and can save a lot of time and work. Rather than seeing appointment type as a handy pigeonhole for patient types, these see appointment type in a critical workflow role of reserving resources for an encounter.

For example, if you schedule a patient’s annual physical, you’ll need a room and someone to do vitals, weight, etc., and an EKG. If you’re a male doctor with a female patient, you’ll want to have a woman staffer scheduled for part of the exam, too.

Rather than schedule these ad hoc, some systems allow you to define the resources needed for the appointment type and schedule them as needed. Greenway’s PrimeSuite, for example, does this. Here’s how it sets up a new appointment type:

  • Click the + sign under the appointment type tab to add the new appointment type.
  • Once you click on the + sign, enter the appointment type in the yellow box
  • To the right of the appointment type name, click the drop down and pick the duration of the appointment type
  • Enter the abbreviation of the appointment type (this will appear on the schedule screen)
  • In box #2 – Enter the patient instructions for this appointment type. This is a friendly reminder to your staff as to what they need to instruct the patient to bring or do.
  • In box #3 – Pick the color of the appointment which will appear on the schedule screen
  • In box #4 – Select and move to the right which resource/provider/room can see this appointment type
  • In box #5 – Select the visit type – category as to which superbill you will want to pull for this appointment type
  • In box #6 – Enter an alternative appointment type that can be printed on confirmations for the patients. This can be the same as box #1, which is your appointment type
  • Click the Save disc at the top
  • Repeat steps until all of your appointment types are entered into the system.

Greenway’s Box No. 4 lets the user specify the resources that go with this appointment type. The user can assign personnel, equipment, rooms, etc. When selected the system checks for availability and reserves them for the needed times.

Greenway’s PrimeSuite Appointment Type Definition Screen

Many practices will be shopping for a new EHR in the coming year. Their shopping lists would do well to include a robust appointment type. Of course, I encourage anyone who’s in the EHR market to use our free resource, EHRSelector.com. The Selector’s Practice Management category has these two appointment type features:

  • PM50 (895) Appointment Type can reserve resources, for example, room, equipment.
  • PM51 (896) Appointment Type can schedule supporting personnel, such as technicians, aides etc.

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Brazen Self Promotion
Recently, I created a new LinkedIn group, EHRUsability. This is the type of issue discussion I hope it will promote. All are welcome.

CommonWell Announces Sites For Interoperability Rollout

Posted on December 13, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Nine months after announcing their plan to increase interoperability between health IT data sources, the CommonWell Health Alliance has disclosed the locations where it will first offer interoperability services.

CommonWell, whose members now include health IT vendors Allscripts, athenahealth, Cerner, CPSI, Greenway, McKesson, RelayHealth and Sunquest, launched to some skepticism — and a bit of behind-the-hand smirks because Epic Systems wasn’t included — but certainly had the industry’s attention.  And today, the vendors do seem to have critical mass, as the Alliance’s founding members represent 42 percent of the acute and 23 percent of the ambulatory EMR market, according to research firms SK&A and KLAS.

Now, the rubber meets the road, with the Alliance sharing a list of locations where it will first roll out services. It’s connecting providers in Chicago, Elkin and Henderson, North Carolina and Columbia, South Carolina. Interoperability services will be launched in these markets sometime at the beginning of 2014.

To make interoperability possible, Alliance members, RelayHealth and participating provider sites will be using a patient-centric identity and matching approach.

The initial participating providers include Lake Shore Obstetrics & Gynecology (Chicago, IL), Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital (Elkin, NC), Maria Parham Medical Center (Henderson, NC), Midlands Orthopaedics (Columbia, SC), and Palmetto Health (Columbia, SC).

The participating providers will do the administrative footwork to make sure the data exchange can happen. They will enroll patients into the service and manage patient consents needed to share data. They’ll also identify whether other providers have data for a patient enrolled in the network and transmit data to another provider that has consent to view that patient’s data.

Meanwhile, the Alliance members will be providing key technical services that allow providers to do the collaboration electronically, said Bob Robke, vice president of Cerner Network and a member of the Alliance’s board of directors.  CommonWell offers providers not only identity services, but a patient’s identity is established, the ability to share CCDs with other providers by querying them. (In case anyone wonders about how the service will maintain privacy, Robke notes that all clinical information sharing is peer to peer  — and that the CommonWell services don’t keep any kind of clinical data repository.)

The key to all of this is that providers will be able to share this information without having to be on a common HIE, much less be using the same EMR — though in Columbia, SC, the Alliance will be “enhancing” the capabilities of the existing local HIE by bringing acute care facility Palmetto Health, Midlands Orthopaedics and Capital City OB/GYN ambulatory practices into the mix.

It will certainly be interesting to see how well the CommonWell approach works, particularly when it’s an overlay to HIEs. Let’s see if the Alliance actually adds something different and helpful to the mix.

Investors To Take Greenway Medical Private

Posted on October 14, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Health IT vendor Greenway Medical Technologies has agreed to be taken private by investment firm Vista Equity Partners for $644 million.  The deal, which comes less than two years after the company went public, will roll up Greenway with Vitera Healthcare Solutions LLC, a privately-held EMR vendor which is owned by Vista Equity, Reuters reports.

Vista has agreed to pay $20.35 per Greenway share, about 19 percent more than the stock’s Tuesday close of $17.13 on the New York Stock Exchange. The price is more than the Greenway shares have seen through its existence as a public company. (According to Reuters, the shares saw a lifetime high of $19.44 in November.)

Greenway has said that stockholders owning about 50.9 percent of its shares have agreed to tender in their holdings and vote to push the deal through. All of Greenway’s directors and some of its executive officers have also agreed to do so, according to the Reuters report.

Vista must have seen tremendous value in hooking up Vitera with Greenway. After all, it’s willing to take on a financially wobbly company that lost $5.1 million in its 2013 fiscal year ending June 30 and pay a premium for it. Although Greenway has regularly commented that many of their revenue issues stem from their move to a monthly revenue model.

If nothing else, the deal bulks up both sides to a level that can only help during an era of EMR consolidation. According to the two companies, the combined entity will serve almost 13,000 medical organizations and 100,000 providers. The new health IT company will be marketed under the Greenway brand.

This transaction made me think about a recent post by my colleague John Lynn regarding the status of the EMR vendor marketplace. It’s his view that we’re past the “Golden Age of EHR Adoption” and that things will be tougher for vendors than ever before. Assuming he’s right — and his thesis is pretty hard to argue — we should see a lot more consolidation deals taking place in the near future.

Mulling Over EMR Market Consolidation

Posted on September 27, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I had the pleasure of attending a Technology Association of Georgia Health Society event last week on mobile health. It offered me a chance to chat with colleagues, and hear from a panel of payers, providers, startups and vendors on the current state of and predictions for mobile health. While networking beforehand, I found myself trying to succinctly answer a colleague’s question of, “Where do you see the EMR market heading in the next few years?”

My short answer was, “It is consolidating and will continue to consolidate.” I had more details and theories on the tip of my tongue, but didn’t get the chance to back up my statements before we were ushered in to the evening’s presentation. It was a big question – one that I think has only one correct answer, but also one that potentially has a variety of explanations behind that answer. Needless to say, I mulled it over that night and into the next day, when, coincidentally, I awoke to news of the Vitera/Greenway Medical deal.

If I had the chance to do it over again, I’d break my response down like this: Meaningful Use obviously provided incentive for businesses to get into the EMR game. Some were already in healthcare, while others were on the fringes. Combine those new industry entrants with companies that have provided EMRs since before HITECH, and you’re left with a crowded market.

Implementations and go lives coinciding with Stage 1 left many providers dissatisfied with the EMR experience thus far, but still willing to forge ahead. As they look to Stage 2, some realize their vendors – whom many are already disenchanted with – will not be up to the task of helping hospitals meet digital patient engagement quotas, among other Meaningful Use guidelines. And so began the rip and replace movement.

Vendors deemed not up to par looked at their options. Many took a step back and reassessed product development and strategy, deciding to either: get out of the healthcare game, close up shop altogether, merge with a competitor, or make themselves available for possible acquisition.

That’s one wave of consolidation. I’m fairly confident we’ll see another wave in the next 12 to 18 months, if it hasn’t already started. (I don’t think we’ll see too many Phoenix-type situations like Google.) As providers dive deeper into using technologies around Stage 2 engagement requirements, they’ll experience a second wave of acceptance or denial. At some point, the EMR replacement market will die down, providers will settle into the technology they’ve settled on, and purchases of new systems will stagnate. EMR sales will thus dry up a bit, forcing vendors to again look at their options. I would think that many will turn into consulting services once the demand for new software has died down.

Now that I’ve put pen to paper and laid out my thoughts, I wonder what readers predict. I encourage you to let me know whether I’m on the mark, totally off base, or somewhere in between.

Retail Clinics Buddy Up with HIT and MU Lessons from a 3 Year Old

Posted on August 23, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

It seems I can’t read a blog, tweet or even old-fashioned newspaper these days without coming across some headline having to do with retail health clinics buddying up to healthcare IT. Announcements from two companies come to mind.

The first involves SoloHealth – developer of health and wellness kiosks. It received FDA approval for its product earlier this summer, and followed that development up with news of financial investment from benefits company WellPoint. It also has announced plans for a national rollout of its kiosks sometime this fall. Assuming its website is up to date, there are SoloHealth Stations across the country at retailers like Walmart, Safeway, Publix, Sam’s Club and Schnucks. CVS appears to be its only traditional retail clinic customer at the moment.

The second involves Greenway Medical – well-known developer of electronic health records for a variety of healthcare organizations, including Walgreen’s Take Care Clinics. It currently has placed its PrimeSuite EHR in more than 700 Take Care pharmacies, and just this week announced plans to implement a custom EHR – WellHealth – to coordinate other types of care in Walgreen’s locations. I’m assuming the two EHRs will play nice with other from an interoperability standpoint. Implementation of all WellHealth systems is expected to be finalized by the end of next summer.

I can’t help but point out that both of these companies are based in Atlanta, and I know for a fact that their team members congregate at similar networking events, so I wonder if we’ll see some synergy between them in the near future.

In any case, if predictions of retail clinic growth prove to be true – a recent Rand Report notes that use of retail health clinics quadrupled between 2007 and 2009, and will continue to grow – it seems likely that we’ll see HIT companies popping up in clinics across the country.

On a completely unrelated note, my daughters and I joined the rest of my company’s team members at the annual Lekotek Run 4 Kids last weekend. We had a great time and enjoyed helping out a great cause. I was a bit apprehensive that my youngest would enjoy it. Before the race began, she came up to me with number in hand and asked, “Is it okay if I lose?” Happily, she declared herself a winner after crossing the finish line and receiving a medal along with her sister and all the other kids.

I wonder if this is a sentiment physicians in smaller practices sometimes have as they consider implementing an EHR in the hopes of receiving Meaningful Use incentive money. Do some just want to throw in the towel and “lose?” Do some not want to even start the race? I’m always looking for additional Meaningful Use wisdom from the under-6 set, so please enlighten me in the comments below.

EHR is More than Software

Posted on July 12, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Far too often when we talk about EHR, we mostly only talk about the software side of an EHR implementation. Certainly selecting the right EHR software is the most important part of an EHR implementation. It will guide and direct many of the other EHR implementation decisions. However, once you’ve selected the right EHR software, you need to make sure and give plenty of attention to the hardware side of an EHR implementation as well. Many don’t and suffer the consequences.

Yes, I know that many clinics and even some hospitals sit back and rely on their EHR vendor to walk them through all their new technical hardware needs. This can work out really well since the EHR vendor knows which hardware will work best with their EHR software. Plus, many EHR vendors have partnered with hardware vendors to provide a really seamless service to their customers. For example, we recently posted to the EMR and EHR video website some HP videos with their EHR partners Greenway and Quest Diagnostics. In fact, at HIMSS I learned about the HP EHReadySM Program which focuses on the seamless EHR implementation experience between EHR software and hardware. I was amazed by the number of EHR partners HP had.

Other clinics have their own in house IT support that deal with all of their EHR hardware needs. In some cases, the doctors themselves act as their own IT support. Regardless of how you approach your EHR hardware, here are some things to consider when it comes to hardware during an EHR implementation:

Consult Other EHR Physician Users – One of the best ways to learn what hardware you need for your EHR is to ask existing users of that EHR. Don’t ask a clinic that’s been using that EHR for more than a year. They’re likely using older hardware you can’t buy anymore and have also forgotten what they bought. Instead ask your EHR vendor for a doctor who’s been using their EHR for about a year.

Existing Infrastructure – Any vendor worth their salt is going to want you to use your existing infrastructure as much as possible. If you just bought a brand new laptop, then there shouldn’t be a need to replace that in order to use the EHR. However, be very careful that you don’t take this too far. I know many clinics who have tried to skate by on old hardware and made their EHR implementation miserable. They finally spend the $500 on a new desktop and EHR satisfaction skyrockets. For some context on when to invest in hardware, read these article on EHR performance issues and EHR slowness. Make sure your lack of investment in hardware isn’t the reason your “EHR is Slow.”

Financing – Yes, the cost of EHR software has dropped dramatically with even a number of high quality Free EHR software offerings. However, many doctors forget to add in the EHR hardware costs including: desktops, laptops, scanners, tablets, printers, cables, network devices, signature pads, cameras, etc. You can and should defray these costs with existing infrastructure as mentioned above, but that only goes so far. All of these hardware costs can add up and especially larger clinics might need to consider financing the cost of all this hardware.

Lifecycle Management – If you’re in a larger clinic you’re going to want to make sure you have a good lifecycle management plan in place for your hardware. A thoughtful replacement cycle for your hardware is so much better than unplanned hardware crashes with no budget plan to replace it. This replacement cycle should also correspond to your EHR vendors ongoing development plans. How much longer will they support your current hardware? When will they support the latest operating system?

Hire Great IT Help – With few exceptions, the best thing a clinic can do is to hire competent IT people to assist them with the selection and implementation of their hardware. A few doctors get a kick out of the latest IT. For the rest of the doctors out there (which is most of you), find great IT support. No, your daughter’s boyfriend who likes computers usually doesn’t match that description.

Hardware Takes Time – When planning your EHR implementation schedule, make sure you give plenty of time to implement the hardware side of the EHR implementation. It takes time to select the hardware, for the hardware to be delivered, for the IT people to implement, configure, and test, the hardware, etc. I’ve seen many EHR implementations delayed while they’re waiting for the hardware to arrive.

Those are a few suggestions to help you out. I hope that readers will offer other suggestions in the comments. My key message for this post is to not forget about the hardware side of an EHR implementation. EHR hardware is completely manageable if you deal with it early. If you wait or skimp, then it can wreak havoc on your EHR plans.

This post is sponsored by HP Healthcare, however opinions on products and services expressed here are my own. Disclosure per FTC’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Some Interesting Thoughts from the EHR Summit

Posted on November 17, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I enjoyed all day at the EHR Summit that’s being held by HBMA in Phoenix. It’s been a really interesting event for me. I had some sound bites from the Ron Sterling keynote queued up, but it’s not connecting to Twitter. So, I’ll see if I can post those tomorrow. Today, I thought I’d post some of my other tweets from the other session. I think you’ll find them interesting, enlightening, thought provoking or some other adjective. I really look forward to the discussion on this post.

EMR software has many versions of the same data. #interesting #EHRSummit11 Think about an HIE as well. They have a version of the data too

HIE’s aren’t good at getting the receiving doctor the second version of a clinical document. #interesting #EHRSummit11

Think about the records retention issues when you switch EHR software companies. Good thought. #EHRSummit11

If you haven’t lost a client to a hospital this year….you will next year. #EHRSummit11 #HBMA

How many EHR companies are billing companies? They have 7 listed on screen. Do you know of others? #EHRSummit11
They have MED3000, Allscripts, Greenway, NextGen, Athena, GE Centricity, Ingenix. Any other EHR companies do billing as well? #EHRSummit11

Shame on you if you hire an EHR Company and don’t check the references. Ask for a list of 10 in that specialty and size. #EHRSummit11

Pre-existing conditions, No lifetime maximum and kids on parents plan for longer are going to increase our insurance costs. #EHRSummit11

Definitely interesting to consider how the healthcare billing industry will be affected by things like ACO’s and concierge. #EHRSummit11

Super bills are going to go away once we get ICD-10. #EHRSummit11 #HBMA

The healthcare billing sales cycle is 12-18 months. #EHRSummit11

Since I’m putting some of my tweets. I also enjoyed a number of the tweets coming out of the ONC Meeting today. Here’s one that really hit me:

RT @INHSbeacon If you’ve seen one CCD, you’ve seen one CCD. Everyone interprets different, we need to find a standard to succeed #ONCMeeting

Yet Another Top EMR List

Posted on June 5, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As any reader of this blog would know, there may be more EMR rankings out there than there are EMRs themselves. Of course, some lists are taken more seriously than others — KLAS comes to mind — but these days, with the money flowing, virtually everyone who can make a PDF is dipping an oar into the EMR ranking game.

The following list, from a a site called Business-Software.com, is particularly cute in that it would appear to be entirely bought and paid for by vendors — there’s nary a critical analysis to be found in the paper.  (Most of the lists I’ve seen at least pretend to be neutral.)

That being said, I still thought it might stimulate conversation among us to share the list.  I’d love to hear whether you think Business-Software.com has provided any value here, and whether you’ve had particularly good (or bad) experiences with listed EMR sellers.

Here’s Business-Software.com’s list, seemingly in no particular order. Where available there’s a link to get a demo/price quote from the vendors on the list courtesy of Medical Software Advice.

* AdvancedMD: Provides Web-based practice management, medical billing and scheduling software as well as an EMR. Includes a patient portal, e-prescribing and mobile access option.

*  Allscripts: Offers EHRs, practice management, revenue cycle management, document management, e-prescribing. Focuses on emergency department and care management systems for hospitals. Get Price of EMR Vendor EMR Vendor Demo

* Greenway: Offers EHR, integrated with practice management system, along with a database integrating clinical, financial and administrative data. Get Price of EMR Vendor EMR Vendor Demo

* Sage: Products include practice management, EHR, document and image management and point-of-care documentation.

* Aprima: Company offers EHR, practice management and revenue cycle management products, all aimed at medical practices. Get Price of EMR Vendor EMR Vendor Demo

* Kareo: Focuses on small medical practices. Key products include Web-based EHR, medical billing and practice management offerings.

* Abraxas Medical Solutions: Sells unified EMR and practice management solution. Product is powered by a single Microsoft-SQL database.

* Celerity Solutions Group: Provides EHR conversion and systems integration solutions to both large and small medical practices.

* NextGen Healthcare: Offers a very wide range of products, including EHRs for physicians, hospitals, health centers and healthcare providers, as well as practice management and financial management systems, HIE and patient portal options. Get Price of EMR Vendor EMR Vendor Demo

* meridianEMR: EMR focused specifically on urology specialists, as well as a product aimed at general surgery.

What bothers me about this list, by the by, is that while it’s almost certainly a series of advertisements, that’s not marked anywhere.

While physicians aren’t dummies by any means, my guess is that some might get sucked in by any list that says “top” in it if they’re feeling desperate enough.  Here’s hoping physicians catch on to the bias here.