Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Healthcare vs Sickcare, MU Undermines EHR Usability, and Kaiser Monkey Game

Posted on July 15, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This might seem a little self serving since I sent this tweet in reply to Georg Margelis’ comment. It’s a really good question though and one I’ve been starting to think about recently. I’ve often heard that the really sick people are the ones that cost healthcare so much money. My question is whether keeping them healthy just delays the costs or whether keeping them healthy actually costs less money long term.


This is such an important topic. I’ve been commenting more and more on this subject. I’ve wondered if a usable EHR can be created that satisfies MU. I imagine it depends on how you define usable.


This is a pretty cool Monkey game from Kaiser. Although, the real value in this article is better understanding some of the approaches that Kaiser is taking to healthcare. So many people salivate over working with Kaiser. It’s good to understand what they are and aren’t looking for if you’re looking for that relationship.

iPad in Health Care

Posted on January 13, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last month Information Week reported on a study by HIMSS of iPad use in health care.

Data showed that nearly 70% of the attendees were from hospitals or healthcare organizations with more than 1,500 employees, and 15% of attendees were executive-level staff or physicians.

More than 25% of the HIMSS respondents plan to deploy the iPad and other iOS devices immediately and nearly 70% plan to deploy the devices within the next year.

I must admit that I have been amazed at the uptake and power of the iPad. After attending the CES conference in Las Vegas last week, you can see a whole slew of iPad copy cat’s that are working to provide the same benefits of the iPad. There’s no doubt that health care will be a major user of this type of device.

The information week article does point out the two biggest challenges with the iPad in health care:

Nearly 75% identified secure configuration and deployment as the number one iPad IT management challenge, and 53% identified mobile application deployment as a key issue.

Security is definitely an important concern that will be ongoing, but is definitely manageable. Then, it’s just getting software vendors to actually leverage an iPad device and it’s unique interface as opposed to just porting their current interface to the iPad. This will take some time.

Now I just need to find a way to get me an iPad. I bet they’ll have a bunch of free iPad giveaways at HIMSS. Maybe I’ll get lucky.

What’s Behind EMR Software

Posted on April 25, 2010 I Written By

I'm a technology strategist in the medical care industry and am backed by more than 10 years of patient care, 5 years of software product management and 6 years of management of technology projects. With my Masters in Public Administration, I am poised to connect the implications of public policy upon both the software and medical care industries.

Guest Blogger: Richard has over 15 years of experience as product manager and public policy analyst. He is currently researching the use of technology to improve health care access. You find more of Richard’s writing on his blog.

No doubt, electronic medical record (EMR) buyers would love to wave their hands and clear the fog that envelops the EMR software purchase process.  Buyers’ uncertainty and distrust combine to create angst and skepticism that their purchase will be the correct one.

One tool to navigate this process: Like a doctor taking a medical and family history, the history and heritage of an EMR vendor can tell you much about the direction and competency of offerings.

Vendors for large customers (hospitals over 250 beds and physician groups over 100) have a historical software competency much like a DNA thread of a virus, with many of the distinct markers carried down to descendents. In the case of software, it is the concept of how the software is built that is carried through each revision and new product.

Prior to EMRs, software was created to register and bill patients and to reconcile financial transactions and records. That is their core competency and strength. To leap to EMR is a complete anathema to the financial paradigm. While orderly in the financial side, the EMR side is counterintuitive to them and their software shows that monolithic belief that once a design has been settled, little else can be done to customize it for future use.

Like their larger brethren, smaller EMR vendors who specialize in the primary care medical market have difficulty in accommodating subspecialties.  That’s because primary care tends to be more uniform in their approach than subspecialists who are much more fragmented than primary care. That fragmentation creates numerous requests for special features that may not be economically feasible for a small EMR vendor.

In summary, the heritage of an EMR vendor won’t ensure that you will be satisfied with your purchase. It will, however, make you aware of the bias and alert to how that may translate to functionality and support.  Vendors can change, but it’s difficult to break that “DNA lineage” unless there is an abrupt break from the past. The next time a sales representative hails you for a sales presentation, look a bit closer at the history and values of the vendor. It might just save you money.