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Burned In EHR Workflows

Posted on November 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the hospital CIOs at The Breakaway Group focus group at the CHIME Fall Forum talked about what he called “Burned IN EHR Workflows.” I thought the concept was really interesting and no doubt something we can all relate with. We all know when the workflows we do are finally burned into our psyche. We often call it our daily routine and we all hate when our routine is disrupted.

As I thought about this idea, I wondered at what point the EHR workflow is finally “burnt in.” There are a lot of factors that go into burning in the EHR workflow. I’d say it rarely happens during EHR training. Although, with the right EHR training it could be the case. The key question is how well your EHR training emulates the actually environment and workflow of the user. Are you just training them on the EHR software or are you training them on the EHR workflow with the new EHR software? I always did the later and found it so much more effective.

As another CIO at CHIME said, “Users don’t want to know the 10 ways to do the same thing. They want to know the single most effective way to do it.” Of course, figuring out the most effective way to do something is the hard part and why so many EHR trainings fall short.

The good thing about burnt in EHR workflows is that if you’ve implemented a great workflow, then it’s great. The problem is that we often burn in sub optimal EHR workflows. I had this happen to me all the time. I’d ask one of my EHR users why they did something a certain way when it would be so much easier to do it another way. It was just the way the EHR workflow was burnt in.

Changing that already burned in EHR workflow is really hard. Although, it’s not impossible and is often necessary. You just have to burn in a new workflow. However, it also often requires an explanation of why the new workflow is better. Good luck changing someone’s workflow when they liked the old workflow. You better have a good reason or they’re unlikely to change.

Leadership Discussions at Healthcare CIO Conference

Posted on October 9, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I get to enjoy the company of 750 attendees at the healthcare CIO conference organized by CHIME (officially called the CHIME Fall CIO Forum). It’s always an amazing experience to break bread and learn from people who are dealing with some of the hard challenges of healthcare IT.

One topic that’s always present at CHIME events is a discussion of leadership. So, it was extremely appropriate that Jim Collins was the opening keynote. The guy just exudes leadership. Here’s some of the tweets I sent out during his keynote.

Highlights from Ed Marx Hospital CIO Strategy Talk at #CHIME12

Posted on October 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was really excited when I found out that Ed Marx’s, CIO of Texas Health Resources, talk at CHIME 2012 was one of the encore presentations since I’d missed it earlier in the week. Thankfully he didn’t disappoint. Here are some tweets I sent during his talk with some additional commentary on what he said.


I loved his comment on the need for hospitals to have a strategy when it comes to mobile health. He acknowledged that even with a strategy in place it’s a pretty crazy environment right now, but he said that he couldn’t imagine where they’d be if they had no strategy. It’s a good acknowledgement that mobile health is here to stay and it’s better to have a proactive approach to mobile health.


Great advice. Far too often I see people trying to swing for the fences instead of being happy with a single. Many hospital organizations could use a quick win for morale sake. Then, with that confidence they can work on the bigger, longer term goals.


There are a lot of ways to learn. Ed Marx pointed out that every hospital CIO should be on social media. I’d argue that the reason they should be on social media is to learn. Learn from customers. Learn from colleagues. Twitter is an amazing platform for learning and listening. You don’t have to broadcast on social media if you don’t want.


I love the transparency that Ed strives to achieve. Putting your performance review for all to read is a brave choice. Although, he made a good point. His performance review wasn’t just a reflection of him, but was a reflection of the entire organization in many ways.


Such a great way to describe the idea of getting out of the office and working with people from other departments. The challenge with this is that many people aren’t very good at this type of social interaction. Some people have this naturally, but others have to work really hard to make it happen. This type of description can help some who have this challenge I think.


I was amazed that he said this was the most important thing. I’ve always loved the value of looking to multiple sources for inspiration. Very important and useful!


Ed suggested that most CIO’s could identify the CEO’s top priority, but not the top 10.


I think it’s true that many hospital CIO’s live in partial fear for their jobs. I guess we all do to some extent. I’m not sure this tweet is going to change things, but hopefully it’s a challenge for many who have avoided risks. Thoughtful risks can work out very well if done right.


Beautiful description of leadership, but hard to achieve.

One other major point that Ed made that I didn’t tweet about had to do with the idea of a project not being an IT project. Ed described the need for IT to make themselves open and available to lead those projects. Although, in order for that to happen, they have to create a trusted leadership role within the organization.

For example, instead of talking to the CEO, CFO, board, etc about project timelines, projects completed, and missed schedule, talk to them about ROI and improved patient care. However, to do so takes a real focus on measuring the costs and benefits of each project.

Why You’re Never Going to Leave a Healthcare IT Job at 5:30

Posted on April 19, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Anybody catch the recent Mashable.com or CNN articles on the feedback Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg has received because she makes it a point to leave work at 5:30 pm every day? (You can read them here and here.) In a nutshell, Sandberg has always left the office around that time – a practice she started when she first had kids, but has only felt comfortable talking about it now that she is in upper management and (presumably) somewhat immune to corporate push back. ( Don’t confuse leaving work with not working, by the way. Sandberg, like many others, checks email at all hours.)

Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore, who authored the CNN.com story, summarizes the mini-controversy that has evolved in the tech world as a result of Sandberg’s coming clean: “In a competitive industry where your work is never truly complete, has it become socially awkward to leave work at a time that used to be the standard? And are those working eight-hour days that end at 5 p.m. being quietly judged by their co-workers? Whatever happened to “work-life balance”?

Good questions, to be sure. So good, in fact, that I felt compelled to pose a similar query to a panel of current and former healthcare CIOs – all guys, by the way – at the recent Women in Technology International (WITI) / GAHIMSS event, “Women in Healthcare IT Talk.”

Piedmont Healthcare CIO Mark Pasquale was refreshingly candid in his response: “I don’t have a work-life balance.” His point being that, as a CIO overseeing a near-future EPIC ERP system go-live, his work day never really ends, especially given how connected he is via multiple mobile devices. He also pointed out that, as 85% of Piedmont’s install team is internal, Piedmont spent copious amounts of time preparing that staff for the time commitment required to travel to Epic headquarters in Madison, Wisc., for training. Pasquale kept an open door, and said many staff members came by multiple times to hash out whether committing to such an intense project was the right move for them.

From left to right: Christopher Kunney, The BAE Company; Sonny Munter, Georgia Dept. of Community Health; Mark Pasquale, Piedmont Healthcare; Praveen Chopra, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Fellow panelist Christopher Kunney, HIT Strategist at the BAE Company and former CIO of Piedmont, made the point that you have to be aware of what you’re signing up for when you enter healthcare’s executive ranks. Long days aren’t unusual; they are the norm. Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta CIO Praveen Chopra concurred, adding that his wife makes him limit use of his Blackberry on vacation to just one hour a day. Sonny Munter, CIO of Georgia’s Dept. of Community Health, joked that he leaves his job everyday at 4pm – but gets going around 6 in the morning. Munter added that he makes it a point to surround himself with good staff members, which also helps in balancing his work and family obligations.

From left to right: Lisa McVey, McKesson; Gretchen Tegethoff, Athens Regional Medical Center; Patty Lavely, CIO Consulting LLC; Deborah Cancilla, Grady Health System

A second panel of healthcare executives – all female – pretty much agreed with their male counterparts. Patty Lavely, founder of CIO Consulting LLC and former CIO of three different health systems, did echo Facebook’s Sandberg just a bit in her comment on the subject: “There comes a time when you have to say, ‘This [work] will be here for me tomorrow. I need to go home and have dinner with my family tonight.”

All of the panelists mentioned the need to prioritize workplace projects and challenges in a way that is suitable to the particular balance they need in their lives. They have triaged, so to speak, their commitments, priorities, deadlines, etc. to fit their schedules.

So, can healthcare IT folks – providers or vendors, executives or otherwise – ever be off the clock, never mind leave the office between 5 and 6? Share your stories and advice in the comments below.