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Fixing Small Stress Inducing Moments Creates Magic

Posted on June 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought this was a really genius perspective that I heard at the WEDI Annual conference. Or at least it was the thought that was inspired at the conference. I think the speaker was referencing various apps like Uber or Lyft and how they took a whole set of small, individually stress inducing moments and solved them.

Using that example, it was stressful to wonder when the cab would come, it’s stressful to know if the cab will take credit cards, it’s stressful to know if the cab is taking a longer route to make you pay more, etc etc etc. None of these individually was all that stressful but combined they made for a pretty stressful experience. Uber and Lyft were able to look at all of those minor individual stresses and make a great customer experience by removing them.

It’s worth pointing out that these companies likely needed to solve more than one stress for their app to be successful. If they’d only solved one small stress, they likely wouldn’t be as popular today as they have been.

Now let’s apply this to healthcare IT. Ironically, I think many would argue that EHRs have taken a bunch of small stresses and turned them into large stresses. That’s the pessimistic viewpoint. Although, it’s pretty hard to argue that most EHR software has taken the stress out of the medical documentation experience. Is it any wonder that so many doctors hate EHR?

I guess I’m pretty pessimistic that EHR vendors will change and start taking the little stresses out of the healthcare experience. A few EHR vendors have done better than others but most of them are making so much money doing what they’re doing, they’re unlikely to change course. Does that mean we give up hope?

Not me. I’m optimistic about technology’s ability to make healthcare better. I just don’t think it’s going to come from EHR vendors. Instead, it’s going to come from entrepreneurs who do create magical experiences that take the small stresses out of a doctor’s or patient’s day. They may tie into the EHR, but they’ll build it separately.

What do you think? Where have you seen solutions that solve the “small” stresses in healthcare? We could use more “magic”.

Fascinating Drawings from #DoMoreHIT Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I got the change to spend the day at SXSW at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event. This is my third year in a row participating and it’s always an exciting event. In case you missed it, I’ve embedded the 3 Healthcare Think Tank sessions on EMR and HIPAA so you can watch the recorded video stream from the event.

Also, during each of the three sessions of the event, an artist was capturing what was being said. You can see each of the three drawings below (Click on the drawing to make it larger).

Session 1: Consumer Engagement & Social Media
Consumer Engagement and Social Media

Session 2: Bridging the Gap Between Providers, Payers and Patients
Bridging the Gap Between Payers Providers and Patients

Session 3: Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Healthcare Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Meaningful Use Solidifies EHR as the Database of Healthcare

Posted on March 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Earlier this month I wrote a post describing EHR as the Database of Healthcare. I believe this is a powerful and important thing to understand. It also led to some good conversation in the comments. As an entrepreneur I’m always interested to see the trends in the industry to hopefully better understand what is going to happen in the future. I think that this is one of those trends.

Just to make the case clearer, consider the effects of meaningful use on EHR software. Meaningful use stage 1 and EHR certification has already hijacked at least one EHR development cycle and you can be sure that meaningful use stage 2 and stage 3 will be hijacking another couple EHR development cycles. You heard me right. In order to meet the EHR certification and meaningful use requirements, most EHR vendors have to put a whole development team focused just on meeting those government requirements.

Meaningful use has codified EHRs into a box.

Instead of allowing EHR software to create innovative solutions it requires standards be met for storing and accessing info. Sure it also adds in security and tries to work towards interoperability, but those aren’t innovations that doctors want to see.

I expect many of the best healthcare innovators will build on top of the EHR base, not try and build the base again.