Engaged, Connected, E-Patients – Major EHR Developments Per Halamka

Posted on November 1, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my ongoing series of Major EHR Developments from John Halamka (see my previous EHR In The Cloud, Modular EHR Software and A Network of Networks posts), his fourth major EHR development from the Technology Review article is: Engaged, Connected, E-Patients.

I think this is one of the sections that Halamka makes some of the most interesting points about the future of healthcare. You should go read this whole section. One major conclusion is that patients are going to be much more involved in their healthcare. Gone are the days that patients just come into the office largely trusting what the doctors tells them. Part of that is likely do to the changing culture of question everything and the other part of it has to do with the access to healthcare information that the internet has provided.

Halamka does mention that research shows that shared decision making between doctors and patients results in better outcomes and that an engaged patient is less likely to sue. Both great reasons for doctors to want an engaged patient. Yet, there are still many of them that don’t like this change. However, most have come to realize that they really won’t have much choice going forward.

Halamka also mentions the new reimbursement models that focus on keeping patients healthy (see all the ACO talk) as opposed to paying best on services rendered (often called fee for service). I’m not sure how much this will be a driver in the engaged, connected, e-Patients. I think the patients will actually run over the doctors with their desire for engagement and their involvement in their healthcare well before any reimbursement model changes occur.

Yes, I think patients will start to demand (in the customer demand sort of way as opposed to the arrogant demands kind of way) their doctors support new forms of engagement. Certainly this will include a number of devices that monitor a patients health. Also, the teleconsultation will become very big as technology brings your doctor back into your home.

As I’ve written about before, I’m excited by the idea that a new form of doctor will be treating “healthy” patients.