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Physician Burnout

Posted on July 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the HIMSS Annual conference, I talked with Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum, about a popular topic at the conference and well beyond: Physician Burnout. You can watch the full video interview I did with Vishal below:

Physician Burnout is such an important topic and I love that Vishal commented that physician satisfaction (the remedy to burnout) is good patient care and an appropriate reward. As it is today, the trend is to ask doctors to compromise good patient care and we’re paying them less in the process. Is there any wonder why physician burnout is so rampant?

Vishal also commented that healthcare technology is used more for documentation than patient care. He argued that the tech piece has focused far too much on documentation as opposed to focusing on the patient. I’d argue that if we focused the tech on the patient, doctors would appreciate technology much more and would be less burnt out.

Finally, I’m always interested to hear what non-EHR technologies Vishal and ClinicSpectrum have launched to make a practice more efficient and profitable. He outlines a bunch of them in the video above. Take a listen and see if some of them can make your life easier and your practice more profitable. It’s time we start considering technology outside the EHR that can make a practice better.

A Small Practice View of Healthcare IT Coming Out of #HIMSS16

Posted on March 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week as I slowly recover from the #HIMSSHaze that sets in after spending a week with 41,000 of your closest friends and 1300+ vendors, I’m taking a second to think about how the small physician practice fits into the future of healthcare IT that was presented at HIMSS 2016.

As the graphic at the bottom of this post shows, just over 40% of attendees at HIMSS are providers. Of course, provider is a pretty broad term and that has to also be paired with the other number on that chart that 30.5% of attendees are part of the C-Suite. Even scarier is that only 2.2% of HIMSS registrations identified themselves as clinicians.

Those who read this blog regularly likely remember that I already wrote about physicians and patients missing at HIMSS. These numbers seem to prove this out. It’s unfortunate, because that means that the physician voice is largely going to be missing in many of the conversations that happen at a show like HIMSS.

With this in mind, it’s not surprising that I think the future for the small practice is on shaky ground. Many of the solutions presented at HIMSS are going to be hard for a small practice to afford. At some point these health IT solutions will be so good that they’ll become the standard of care. Once that happens, where does that leave the small practice provider who can’t afford these high tech solutions?

Considering many small practices aren’t joining in these conversations, I think it’s going to leave many small practices up a creek without a paddle. No doubt there’s a large portion of the physician population that are betting that retirement will come before this becomes a reality. Others probably think that the worst that could happen is that they’ll have to work for a large organization.

Despite this rather negative outlook on the future of small practices, there is some hope. When you look at the work that Farzad Mostashari is doing at Aledade to make accountable care and valuable based reimbursement available to the small practices you can see a future where small practices can survive even in this changing reimbursement landscape.

I think there are two models that I see emerging to allow small practices to keep some autonomy and survive in this changing healthcare world. First, small practices have to join together with other small practices to be able to create a large enough entity to be able to share in the costs associated with this future technology and to be able to compete with much larger hospital systems. Second, we need organizations like Aledade that help small practices survive by spreading their resources across a diverse group of small practices.

There is strength in numbers. So, whether the small practices form together themselves or whether health IT vendors essentially create a network of small practices, either option requires small practices to combine their efforts in order to survive. It reminds me of this clip from the film Finding Nemo. Small practices need to start “Swimming Together!”

Here’s a look at the registration numbers for HIMSS 2016:
HIMSS 2016 Registrations by Title and Worksite

Hyperportalotus: Condition Whereby Patient Has Too Many Healthcare Acquired Portals

Posted on March 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed the last day of HIMSS 2016 (which is most of you since the keynote area was pretty empty), you missed a number of interesting keynote sessions and other education sessions. However, as I thought through the sessions that day, this comment from a patient attending one of those sessions really stood out to me:

Based on the reaction of the crowd to this comment and my own experience talking with thousands of doctors and patients, this is a very common problem. Meaningful use encouraged providers to have a patient portal, but this had the unintended side effect of what I’d call portal proliferation.

The patient who commented about her “hyperportalotus” said that she knew that she had portals for most of her providers, but she couldn’t keep track of which provider was on which portal. No doubt she was embarrassed when she couldn’t remember how to log in to that many portals as well. Plus, the last thing any sick person wants to do is go searching through 9 portals to find the one that has the information they need.

What concerns me most about Hyperportalotus is that I don’t think there’s a clear pathway to treating this debilitating problem. There are some treatments that make it better, but the problem still remains and I don’t see a cure for the problem coming anytime soon. Is the government going to come out with a portal non-proliferation treaty? I don’t think so.

Before I get a wave of pitches that you’ve solved this problem, I’ll make it clear that I don’t think the patient being an HIE of one is a scalable solution. That idea might work for some patients, but it won’t work for most. Plus, the complexity of each portal having their own format and design causes so many issues with the concept of the patient being the repository and aggregator of their health information.

I’d love to hear how people think this will play out? We got a bunch of doctors on the portal. Now what?

#HIMSS16 Twitter Round Up #4 – Keynote Speakers

Posted on March 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today HIMSS 2016 had 2 keynote speakers that were well worth the price of admission. They both entertained, informed and inspired. Here’s a few insights from each from my live tweeting their sessions (the first is a must read for those who care about marketing and the HITMC community):

Dr. Jonah Berger

Peyton Manning

How amazing that sportscenter was reporting from the HIMSS conference on what Peyton Manning said in his keynote and how that related to his chances of returning or retiring? Pretty crazy stuff indeed.

My final thought on HIMSS 2016 (Although join us for this video discussion (blab) about HIMSS 2016 next week):

#HIMSS16 Twitter Round Up #3

Posted on March 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time again for a quick look around the Twittersphere from the HIMSS 2016 conference in Las Vegas.


I talked with Rasu about this at RSNA. The problem with this is that simple is harder to do.


I think we can already benefit from AI and automation even if the silos aren’t broken down. We shouldn’t wait.


Certainly we can’t predict things 100%, but we can predict many things with pretty solid accuracy if we have the right data points. We shouldn’t allow the fact that we can’t predict perfectly keep us from doing our best to predict future healthcare conditions.


This shift is certainly in the air at HIMSS. Payers are following CMS’ lead.


My only complaint with this picture is that they should be juggling about 300 more items.

#HIMSS16 Twitter Round Up #2

Posted on March 2, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time again for a quick look around the Twittersphere from the HIMSS 2016 conference in Las Vegas.


I’m not sure getting run over is the right analogy. I agree that organizations that don’t change will fail. However, if they’re getting run over, then it’s likely by a really slow moving vehicle. Kind of reminds me of the analogy of the frog in the pot of boiling water. The changes happening in healthcare are happening so slowly that many don’t recognize what’s coming.


I think this is such a poor analogy that needs to die. Exchanging data in a money transaction is so simplistic. Exchanging healthcare data is at least an order of magnitude more complex.


I’m going to be chewing on this one for a while. What do you think?


I’m biased to this since it’s from an article I wrote. Does anyone think the future of healthcare won’t be built on the back of data?


We’re just getting started in genomics, but hopefully as we do we’ll learn the lesson from other healthcare IT that we have to present the data in a useful manner or it won’t be used.


I’ve heard this talked about a lot at HIMSS. Can we just start stating it as fact? Patients will come in with more info. That’s reality. Now let’s figure out how to make the most of the change.

#HIMSS16 Twitter Round Up #1

Posted on March 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite blog posts is the Twitter round up of interesting tweets plus a little commentary on each tweet. So, here goes the first look at some of the interesting tweets I’ve seen coming out of the HIMSS 2016 conference.


This was the way the HIMSS conference keynote started out. It’s better in person, but was a pretty cool display of technology.


Interesting layout. I think that very few of our efforts have reached the 4th act of the play.


I think this is one of the big themes coming out of HIMSS16. A lot of companies and people are interested in what can be done to improve someone’s health outside of the doctor’s office or hospital. However, I’ve also seen first hand what a challenge that can be.


I agree 100%. The challenge we face in healthcare today is that we have far more regulation than a culture of innovation.


I’m still really chewing on this one. I think the message is we should be more sympathetic of the challenges patients face. However, I think we also should be sympathetic of the challenges that healthcare providers face as well.

Of course, there are a lot more tweets on the #HIMSS16 hashtag. Those were a few that I found insightful. Let everyone know what you found interesting in the comments.

Preview Videos of HIMSS 2016 in Las Vegas

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I got a unique chance to get an early preview of some of the HIMSS 2016 Annual conference and talk to a number of the people behind the HIMSS conference. Check out these videos to learn a bit more about what to expect at the HIMSS Annual conference and highlights of a few areas and sessions you might not know about. Plus, you get a great look at the HIMSS 2016 keynote area.

HIMSS Spot Activities and HIMSS Social Media

The HIMSS “Living Room”

HIMSS Keynote Stage and a Preview of HIMSS Sessions

Finding Patient and Connected Health Sessions at HIMSS

What to Expect at HIMSS 2016 with Samsung CMO

Posted on February 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the full video recording embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

2016 February - What to Expect at HIMSS 2016 with Samsung CMO-blog

For our next Healthcare Scene interview, we’ll be sitting down with David Rhew, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung on Friday, February 26, 2016 at 4 PM ET (1 PM PT). With HIMSS 2016 just around the corner, we’ll have a lot to talk about as far as what we expect to hear and see at HIMSS. No doubt we’ll be talking about why a company that’s largely been known as a consumer company is having such a big presence at HIMSS. We’ll be sure to talk about the connected hospital, BYOD, healthcare security, Internet of Things (IoT), wearable technologies and much more.

You can join my live conversation with David Rhew, M.D. and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask Dr. Rhew questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Friday, February 26, 2016 at 4 PM ET (1 PM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’re hoping to include as many people in the conversation as possible. The discussion will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

As we usually do with these interviews, we’ll be doing a more formal interview with Dr. Rhew for the first ~30 minutes of this conversation. Then, we’ll open up the floor for others to ask questions or join us on camera. Each year I’ve seen Samsung’s presence in healthcare grow, so I’m excited to hear from Dr. Rhew about the Samsung perspective on healthcare IT and the HIMSS Annual Conference.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

Do Patients Trust Their Doctor or Health Related Websites More?

Posted on February 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Philips has really been killing it on Twitter leading up to HIMSS 2016 in Las Vegas. Plus, they’ve been making a number of big announcements in the healthcare space as well. While they’ve always been quite big in the radiology and device space, it’s interesting to see Philips enter other healthcare IT spaces. For example, Philips recently announced a collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to offer a secure data recover service.

Philips’ announcements aside, I was intrigued by this image and tweet that Philips recently shared:
Philips Health - Trust Doctors or Websites

I was trying to reconcile this data with the all too common high percentages of people that are searching Dr. Google for health information. First, it’s worth noting that it says “health-related websites” and not a search result found on Google. I wonder how different this percentage would be if they’d asked if they trust a search engine result for health information. I could see many not trusting the former, but many trusting the later.

The other thing I think applies is that even though we read a health related website, that doesn’t mean we trust it. I think many of us treat health related websites with the “trust but verify” approach. We’ve become very sophisticated at triangulating data across websites, social media, and yes, our doctor. We’re no longer simplistic creatures that blindly go to the doctor and trust whatever they say. We triangulate what we hear from all of these sources and apply a trust value to each.

In this complex calculation, I think that most of us do trust our doctor generally more than what we read from our friends on social media and on health-related websites. We should. Doctors spent a lot of time in school and have a lot more experience treating patients. Hopefully, our outside research will deepen the discussion and trust we have with the doctor.

I recently read an incredible quote from Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson (Better known as @SeattleMamaDoc):

If it offended me, I would be a total moron! I think that any physician that would be upset by a patient going online doing personal research and bringing those care points to the visit really better question what’s going on in their mind.

I’d argue that doctors that don’t want you collaborating in your care and researching out your health likely shouldn’t be trusted. I also feel it’s important to point out that this doesn’t mean that the patient should be disrespectful or arrogant or mean to their doctor who disagrees with their research. Outside information is not an excuse for being a jerk. However, patients should use every resource they have to make sure they receive the best care possible and the answers to the questions they have about their care.

The best way a doctor can improve a patients trust in them is to collaborate with the patient in their care. Patients generally trust their doctor more than online health resources. However, that could change if doctors don’t see patients as collaborators in their care.