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EHR Blogger Attrition

Posted on May 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Someone at HIMSS asked me who the up and coming healthcare IT bloggers were in the industry. It was an interesting question. It’s not really sexy to start an EHR blog right now. The golden age of EHR blogging is over and I’m interested to know where EHR and healthcare IT blogging is going to go in the future. The good part is that the use of technology to improve healthcare is never going to go away. It may not be called EHR, but we’ll always be working with the latest technology that can make healthcare better.

As I look through the list of health IT and EHR bloggers on HITsphere, It’s really interesting to see how many bloggers have stopped blogging in the 8.5 years since I started.

Even more than dedicated health IT and EHR bloggers, we’ve seen a lot of company bloggers basically stop as well. For example, I miss seeing Evan Steele’s weekly posts on the EMR Straight Talk blog. Of course, he’s now moved on from the day to day of SRSsoft. I guess that’s a natural part of the cycle, but it’s too bad a company doesn’t continue on with the blog. (UPDATE: After Evan Steele posted a transition post and the people at SRSsoft have taken up and continued with regular blog posts from the new CEO and also many of their staff. I love when there’s a culture of blogging at a company. Nice work SRSsoft) Not that keeping a blog with fresh content is easy. It’s not.

There are still quite a few bloggers that started blogging about the same time as me and are still doing their thing. A few that come to mind include: Neil Versel, HIStalk, Healthcare IT Guy, Lab Soft News, and Christina’s Considerations.

That’s not to say that there aren’t still some great health IT blogs out there. There are still quite a few good ones, but not many new ones. Knowing that I’ll anger some people I don’t list (feel free to mention your blog in the comments and I’ll see about doing a future post with ones not listed here) here are a few of the ones I think do great work: Manage My Practice, Health System CIO, Chilmark Research, and HITECH Answers.

I just remembered this CDW list of Top 50 health IT blogs. It has some other good ones as well. Although, I might be bias since 8 of the 50 are part of Healthcare Scene. I’d love to hear what other blogs you read or places you go for great content.

When an EHR Pilot Makes Sense

Posted on May 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been a real fan lately of Dr. Jayne’s in the trenches commentary on the EHR implementations she’s apart of as CMIO. In her latest post she offered some really valuable insight into the integration of a physician group her health system purchased. The physician group wanted a bunch of custom content and Dr. Jayne’s team had convinced them of half of their recommendations and then she offers this insight:

At this point and given their resistance, I can get on board with half. It’s certainly more than none. Through discussion of their actual needs and observing their workflow, we’ve even identified a handful of customizations that we’re going to advocate that our vendor incorporate into the product out of the box. Ultimately, what allowed us to get the agreement we achieved was the idea they will be piloting the changes for a couple of months after the upgrade and then we’ll revisit them.

We added the pilot approach when we sensed they were stuck in analysis paralysis. The reluctance of the identified physician champions to make decisions was palpable. They feared backlash from their colleagues and claimed to be unable to reach consensus.

I had a somewhat similar situation happen to me on my first EHR implementation. The clinic had real fears about the transition to EHR. However, they needed to replace some old bubble scanning sheets which were no longer supported on this really old system. So, instead of going all in with a full EHR implementation, we did a partial EHR implementation as a kind of “pilot” for the clinic.

What resulted from this was really amazing. A week or so into the partial EHR implementation, the providers started asking us why we weren’t using the rest of the EHR features. In fact, some of them started using the other features before we even asked or trained them on it. I still remember walking into the director’s office and saying, “They’re asking me why we aren’t using all of the EHR features.” We quickly corrected that and implemented the full EHR a few weeks later.

You should never underestimate the value of jealousy. If you let a few people play with the shiny new toy, the others will be jealous. Of course, you better make sure that the shiny new toy works as proposed. Plus, don’t get sick with Pilotitis either.

Dr. Jayne also offered this powerful insight which says a lot about her as a leader in her institution:

I’ve been through this enough times to know what kinds of darts their colleagues might start throwing, so I was happy to offer myself as a virtual human shield. If using the larger health system as the scapegoat for required change is what it takes to move them ahead, so be it.

There are a lot of ways to deal with the “darts” of colleagues. Although, the best answer to the problem is having a real leader with a vision and understanding of where you want to take your EHR. Having a great leader at the helm of an EHR implementation has been the key difference between the good and bad EHR implementations I’ve seen.

Not All EHR Clicks Are Evil

Posted on April 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s a great blog post on HIStalk that is a beautiful CMIO Rant. He provides some really needed perspective on the issues with EHR software. In many ways, the post reminded me of my post titled “Don’t Act Like Charting on Paper Was Fast.” In that post, I highlight the fact that far too many people are comparing EHR against doing nothing versus comparing EHR against the alternative. Those are two very different comparisons.

The money line from the CMIO rant was this one:

If we insist that all clicks are wasted time, then we can’t have a conversation about usability, because under the prescription pad scenario, the only usable computer is one you don’t have to use at all.

I love when you take something to the extreme. It’s true that we all want stuff to just happen with no work. That’s perfect usability. However, that’s just not the reality (at least not yet). If we want the data to be accurate and to be recorded, then it takes human intervention (ie. clicks). Some clicking is necessary.

The CMIO goes on to say that the key to EHR usability is expectations. I thought that was an interesting word to describe EHR usability. I’ve written about this topic before when I compared the number of EHR clicks to the keys on a piano. In that article I suggested that the number of clicks wasn’t the core issue. If we could create EHR software that was hyper responsive (like a piano key), was consistent in its response speed, and we provided proper training, then having a lot of EHR clicks wasn’t nearly as big an issue.

Not that this should be an excuse for EHR vendors to make crappy software. They should still do what they can to minimize clicks where possible. However, the bigger problem is that we haven’t achieved all three of these goals. So, we’ll continue to hear many people complaining about all the EMR clicks.

Major EHR System Downtime Causing Issues

Posted on January 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For many years, I’ve been writing about the potential damage that EHR down time can have on an organization. I’ve also been writing a number of things to try and help organizations battle against EHR downtime. For example, here’s a few of the articles I’ve written: Cost of EHR Down Time, Reasons Your EHR Will Go Down, and SaaS EHR Down Time vs. In House EHR Down Time. The reality is that EHR down time is going to happen and as more organizations adopt EHR it’s going to happen more frequently.

The past week I’ve gotten a number of people emailing me about the pain it’s been having their EHR down. Here’s one message I got from a doctor:

Today, the whole system ground to a halt and froze screens for 10 to 15 seconds at a time, which made it impossible to get our documentation done on time when trying to see 15 to 20 patients each in a day. Both myself and my colleague weren’t able to finish any of our work. My colleague called the system “unbearable” today. Hence, we get to spend the weekend working to catch up.

I guess it could be worse. We could be paying for it.

Another doctor on the same system wrote:

I have had nothing but trouble with my EHR the last two days. I can’t enter new notes. Their Help Desk takes 10 minutes to get respond on line. Not happy at all.

The former doctor had a similar complaint about the EHR helpdesk, but described the help desk’s response as “denying any problems exist even though it’s obvious when the problems do exist.”

Sometimes it’s not even the EHR vendor’s fault that the EHR is down, but it still illustrates the pain of not being able to access your EHR. HIStalk broke the news of the Epic EHR downtime (caused by a network issue) that occurred at Martin Health System in Florida. Here’s the CIO’s response to HIStalk’s inquiry:

Martin Health System had a hardware failure that has resulted in our network being down. The failure occurred the evening of Jan. 22 and we are continuing to work on rectifying the situation. Epic is among the systems being impacted by this hardware failure, however, it was not the genesis of the problem. We are continuing operations as scheduled, while strictly monitoring any potential patient safety concerns or issues that would require appropriate care determinations to be made. Our patient care teams are following downtime procedures and protocols to ensure patient safety and proper documentation is provided.

HIStalk offered more insight on the downtime a few days later:

From Scooper: “Re: Martin Hospital. You scooped the main media on their EHR crash.” I just happened to have a reader with a friend who was admitted at the time and he passed the information along to me. CIO Ed Collins was nice to provide a response. The contact said it was chaos in the hospital, with confused employees assigning random numbers to patients, runners delivering paper copies of everything, medication errors occurring, and unhappy family members threatening to sue everything that moved (all unverified, of course.) The hospital says the problem was hardware, not Epic, and claims (as hospitals always do) that patient care wasn’t impacted. Of course patient care was impacted – the $80 million system that runs everything went down hard. It would be interesting for Joint Commission or state regulators to show up during one of these hospital outages anywhere in the country to provide an impartial view of how well the downtime process works. All that aside, downtime happens and the key is preparing for it, just like Interstate Highway construction and lane-closing accidents. It’s not a reason to drive a horse and buggy.

It amazes me that it took them from Wednesday night until Friday morning to recover from the downtime. That seems like a failure of downtime procedures. I do find all of this EHR downtime really interesting in light of the recent video interview I did with Jason Mendenhall discussing healthcare in the cloud and data centers. They guarantee 100% uptime for power and connectivity. However, even in a 100% uptime data center, that doesn’t mean the application software might not have its own issues. Although, it does remove some points of failure.

HIStalk is right that EHR downtime happens. The key really is being prepared for when it does happen with proper downtime procedures. Although, that doesn’t mean healthcare and EHR vendors can’t do more than we’re doing now to make it happen less often.

My issue isn’t with EHR downtime, but with preventable EHR downtime. Plus, let’s own up to when it happens and learn from the experience. I know how hard it is on a call with EHR support to explain when a software is “down.” Sure, the server might be up and running, but end users know when something isn’t running smoothly in their EHR. Trying to convince low level EHR support people that it’s indeed an issue is a real challenge. It’s so much easier to point fingers than to try and fix the problem.

Allscripts (MDRX) Management Shakeup Spreading: Is Glen Tullman Next?

Posted on May 1, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

And Caesar’s spirit, raging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry “Havoc!” and let slip the dogs of war,
Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 1

If ever there was havoc in the boardroom of a health IT company, this is it. Over the last several days, chairman Phil Pead (bio still up for now), CFO William Davis and three board members unceremoniously and promptly departed the management team at Allscripts Healthcare (MDRX), a company which, it’s hard to argue, otherwise seems to have been on a reasonable course for the past year or so.

By the way, this seems to have been as much an Eclipsys purge as a board purge, as all of the departing members were with the company, which Allscripts acquired in September 2010 with “a vision for a Connected Community of Health.”

Within a few days, the Board announced that it had elected board member Dennis Chookaszian as Chairman. No word yet on which unlucky CFO will be hired to face the fires of investor displeasure over the stock’s performance (see below).

It’s bad enough when a chairman and three board members split — allegedly in support of now-ex chairman Phil Pead — but when your CFO leaves, a girl’s gotta wonder whether financial improprieties will turn up later. Now, let’s be clear, I’m not suggesting that there are ANY financial issues that I know of myself, directly, but it’s never a nice thing to see Mr. CFO shove off so quickly.

What we do know is that Allscripts was slapped with a suit in 2009 alleging the company broke federal securities laws when it went live with the latest version of its EMR. Current CEO Glen Tullman and now departed CFO William Davis were named as defendents. The  accusations in the 2009 suit seem to boil down to that Allscripts failed to let customers know that it couldn’t afford to install its Touchworks 11 software properly on customer sites.

It gets even better

And now, even more fun. Perhaps to contribute to the gladiatorial atmosphere, one of Allscripts’ largest shareholders demanded Monday April 30 that its chief executive Glen Tullman resign.  (If I were Tullman I’d say “the heck with that,” gather a group of investors and buy the darned thing out from under them. Mr. Tullman, go for it!)

Anyway, it seems that HealthCor Management LP, which owns about 5 percent of Allscripts outstanding shares, thinks execs have done a bad job building the value of the stock. The fund said the stock  is “being valued well below any reasonable acquisition price,” at its Friday close of $10.30.  Other investors seem to agree with HealthCor, as the stock went  up 7.73 percent to $11.10 at the close of trading on Monday April 30.

To make sure nobody panics, the company has hurriedly announced a $200 million stock repurchase  plan, adding to a plan announced a year ago which still contains $148 million for repurchase. That should do something to keep the stock from careening down a greased slide.

Why, oh why?

Now, to the real question. Why the big shakeup in the boardroom at a time when EMR/EHR companies are extremely vulnerable to market shifts and missteps? I can’t say I’ve found any concrete reason in my research, other than storied “differences of opinion over the direction of the company.”

The financials, while they could probably be much stronger, aren’t exactly pathetic. We’ve got a 5.1 percent profit margin, quarterly revenue growth year over year of 25.5 percent and a P/E (ttm, intraday) of 28.52.  The only obvious disappointment is the big drop in share price, which fell nearly 50 percent over the last 52 weeks of trading.

And in a somewhat ironic twist, it seems that Allscripts is touting some variant of the software Eclipsys had (Touchworks) when it first ran into SEC trouble.  Allscripts may not like the guys behind the technology, but it likes the technology for sure. (Actually, I’m eager to learn more what Allscripts is doing there — drop us a note on our contact us page if you have more information.)

P.S.
  In the view of your friend and mine Mr. HISTalk, “No matter what explanations are provided, the casual observer might conclude that Glen (Tullman) staged a coup that cost the company four board members and its CFO at the worst possible time.” What do you think?

Playing the EHR Memory Game

Posted on March 14, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I try to avoid navel-gazing, which to me means commenting on someone else’s commentary – a practice all too commonly relied upon in the healthcare IT blogosphere. How many blogs, articles and rebuttals have been generated, after all, as a result of the Health Affairs/Mostashari back-and-forth in the past few days? Quite a few, and yours truly happily participated in the fringe commentary. So as you can see, sometimes a topic already covered by someone else just begs for a second opinion, which I’ll happily give if the context is right.

Yesterday I came across two pieces of online content that I couldn’t help but draw correlations between. The first, a blog written by Dr. Rick Weinhaus entitled “Humans Have Limited Working Memory,” tells the tale of our poor ability to retain information, made all too obvious by a common EHR design feature – the utilization of a row of clickable tabs at the top of a dashboard to designate the different categories of data that make up the patient visit.

Dr. Rick laments that since humans are capable of only retaining four to five unrelated elements in working memory, the row of one-click tabs, though logical, doesn’t work very well. In fact, it drives him “crazy.”

I certainly believe in our limited capacity for remembering unrelated things at any given time, and I’m sure other working parents will agree. Our capacity for keeping everything straight is finite – the more kids, colleagues, coworkers, patients, tabs, bells and whistles you add, the more likely you are to forget something, leave something behind, or, if you’re like me, leave your car door wide open in a parking lot while grocery shopping with two kids in tow. But I digress.

The second piece of content revolves around the results of a survey put out by CDW Healthcare on what clinicians find frustrating about implementing new health IT systems. Surprise, surprise, “too many passwords to memorize” came in at the top, emphasizing what Dr. Rick pointed out in his unrelated blog post.

So what’s a clinician to do? Especially those that work in multiple facilities on different EHRs? Are you like me, scribbling down usernames and passwords on a master paper document, which just screams “privacy breach waiting to happen?” How are vendors helping to address these issues – single sign-ons? Better, overall design? Whose doing it the right way when it comes to designing an EHR, or as Dr. Rick says, designing one “based on what humans are good at — using our visual system to make sense of the world?”

Please let me know in the comments below.

Hurricane Irene Highlights Life-Saving Potential of Mobile EMRs

Posted on August 31, 2011 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Watching the East Coast prepare for Hurricane Irene last weekend had me flashing back to the aftermath of the tornadoes that hit Joplin, Missouri, earlier this year. Would hospitals suffer the same levels of destruction that St. John’s Regional Medical Center did? Would they be as successful in evacuating patients and treating them off-site with limited supplies and infrastructure?

Fortunately, lessons learned from providers in Joplin, and to a greater extent from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, enabled providers along the East Coast to implement well thought-out disaster preparedness plans at their facilities. Mother Nature also lent a hand by withholding from Hurricane Irene the extreme conditions her predecessor unleashed on the South some six years ago.

The team at North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System makes a compelling case study for the smoothness with which detailed planning can bring to hospital evacuation scenarios. The short video below gives a glimpse into the efforts the hospital’s staff put forth to evacuate 252 in-patients and 50 emergency department patients in less than 24 hours. The helpful Mr. HISTalk has compiled a brief list of updates on several additional hospitals affected by the storm (scroll down to the bottom of the post for updates).

It was by pure coincidence that news of e-MDs’ launch of its Rounds® mobile EMR app for the iPhone reached my desk just as Hurricane Irene was closing in on land. The new app enables physicians to remotely and securely key in patient information from their EHRs via their mobile device – surely a tool that physicians would find useful in treating patients during an evacuation process such as that undertaken by North Shore-LIJ.

Patrick Hall, Executive Vice President of Business Development at e-MDs, told me that the mobile health solution was launched “to help our physician clients stay connected to patient information. We have observed that [they] have been dealing with more and more work when they are away from the office. This provides them with a convenient tool to deal with some of this, using an easily carried device that gives them access to complete patient information so they can make informed decisions about patient care.”

I’ll be interested to learn if any hospitals or private practice physicians came away with “success” stories because of their mobile EMR solutions. I think we can all breathe a sigh of relief that successes this time around far outnumber the failures.

My Top 3 Health IT Bloggers

Posted on May 18, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Folks, today I thought I’d take things in a different direction in share links to my favorite health IT bloggers.  Each brings insight, straight talk and deep experience in the healthcare business to the table.

By the way, just to avoid bragging too much, I haven’t included the other blogs in the Healthcare Scene network, but I recommend them highly!

Now, without any further ado, here’s the list:

* The Candid CIO:  This blog offers a rare view into the mind of the IT leader of a large health system.  It’s written by Will Weider, CIO of Ministry Health Care and Affinity Health System. As he notes, the system includes 14.5 hospitals and 400 employed physicians across northern and central Wisconsin. Weider delivers as promised: he’s candid, conversational and quite willing to share his frustrations when things don’t go well.  Definitely a worthwhile read.

*  The Healthcare IT Guy
:  This blog, which is written by health IT consultant Shahid Shah, is always an interesting read. His goals are ambitious — he calls the blog a “healthcare IT, EMR, EHR, PHR, medical content, and document management advisory service” — but believe it or not, he manages to cover pretty much all of this territory. Shah is an entertaining writer with a very long health IT resume, and he knows his stuff.  I learn something new whenever I visit.

* HISTalk:  Something’s always bubbling away at HISTalk, an influential site where insider industry folks come to hang out. Mr. HISTalk, an anoymous health IT administrator, not only provides interesting content, but also draws out juicy gossip from readers. For example, check this item out:  “Re: Cerner. Word on the street is that Cerner is getting ready to announce some big organizational changes and these are not good kind of changes for the employees (may be good for Wall Street, however). This is supposed to hit the CareAware division pretty hard.”  I don’t know if any blog is a “can’t miss” but it’s a good idea to visit now and then.

So, I hope you enjoy these sites — I have for years. Meanwhile, I’m open to hearing about other great health IT blogs as well. Please feel free to let me know if there’s others you admire.

Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) – Hospitals Buying Up Practices

Posted on April 5, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone in healthcare is currently talking about the recently released proposed rule on Accountable Care Organization (ACO). In fact, I posted on EMR and HIPAA a guest post about the ACO Legislation and its ties with healthcare IT, meaningful use and EMR. It’s definitely worth a read.

This move to ACO’s (and to some extent healthcare IT) were described nicely by Maria Todd on Twitter:

As many have said, the ACO train has left the station. In an October article, HIStalk posted about the movement of hospital organizations acquiring physician practices and offered some lessons learned from similar movement back in the 1990’s.

An interesting analysis: hospitals are buying up primary care practices to prepare themselves to become Accountable Care Organizations, which could be the end of the line for small, independent practices. Hospitals are looking at increasing PCP salaries like a Wall Street analyst looks at price-to-earnings ratios, knowing that internists and family practitioners generate hospital revenues at nine times their average salaries, while expensive specialists generate a multiple of only five times their salary. For industry noobs, it’s time for hospitals to get taken to those 1990s cleaners all over again, because:

  1. Docs sell out precisely because they don’t want to work  as hard for their new hospital employer as they did for themselves (duh).
  2. Hospitals are notoriously bureaucratic and inefficient managers, making them particularly unsuited for running a low-overhead medical practice in every way from EMRs to personnel policies to regulatory compliance.
  3. Private practice docs hate and distrust everything about hospitals except the money they have and don’t usually change their opinions or behaviors just because they sell them their practices.
  4. Doctors resent taking orders and being told how to practice medicine, especially from suit-wearing hospital MBA-types who fancy themselves business experts despite always having worked for a paycheck instead of themselves, making it likely all these deals will fall apart in 4-5 years like they did last time around, with the docs scrambling to start up new practices without the benefit of a location, an EMR, or patients that they sold away to the local hospital in a frenzy of co-opetition.
  5. Patients aren’t much more enthused about hospitals than doctors are, so they aren’t exactly thrilled to see the big sign go up over their friendly little doctor’s office knowing it’s the same folks with ED waits, bad cafeteria food, and terrible parking.

I’ll be really interested to see how these ACO organizations play out and if it is indeed the end of the small physician practice. Although, my gut feeling say that this is cyclical.

While hospitals buying physician practices is one method for creating an ACO, I’d love to hear other models that might be used to create an ACO. Feel free to sound off in the comments with your thoughts and ideas.

Allscipts Views on KLAS Conflict of Interest

Posted on September 30, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HISTalk posted an interesting comment from Allscripts about KLAS and why Allscripts stopped working with KLAS to rate their EHR software:

We agree that there is a conflict of interest in having vendors pay large fees to the same company that is producing the ratings. We reached the same conclusion a few years ago and discontinued the practice. After our recent merger with Eclipsys, we inherited an existing Eclipsys contract that was in place with KLAS, so the information reported by the writer was technically correct. However, we have now canceled that contract and we do not currently pay KLAS anything. We realize that is counter-intuitive as we currently are and have consistently been highly rated across many product categories by KLAS, but ultimately we didn’t feel it was right to pay a firm that was also rating our products.

I’ve never really understood why so many people have put so much value in KLAS. I’ve never found it to be that value (at least on the EHR rating side).

The problem is that SOOO many people are looking for a source of information on how to rate and rank the various EHR vendors. They’re looking for some way to differentiate the 300+ EMR companies out there. Unfortunately, there’s no ranking, certification, JD Power like or consumer report like service that does this for EHR software.

I think there’s a huge opportunity there, but it’s a nearly impossible task to do it effectively (ie. it provides value to the doctors) and without any sort of conflict of interest. Thus we end up with services like KLAS.