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Steve Jobs and Healthcare IT – EMR

Posted on October 7, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I like I’m sure many of you have been a bit overwhelmed by the amazing outpouring of love that’s happened after the passing of Steve Jobs. It was weird for me, because I knew that Steve Jobs health wasn’t good but I was still a bit shocked to see on Twitter that he’d passed away. Certainly a major loss for his family, but the effect will be felt well beyond them.

I’ve been touched by a number of posts throughout the healthcare IT and EMR blogosphere. Here’s a roundup of a few of the Steve Jobs posts I found.

Jim Tate did a post that considers what if Steve Jobs had developed an EHR. Here’s one section:

For the past 5 years I’ve kept hoping that Apple would develop an EHR. One that when someone first used it they would say: “Yes, this is how it should be”. Whatever he developed and released to the world didn’t even need an owner’s manual. It just worked in a very human way.

I know I’ve written about the possible Apple EHR as well and what it might look like. As I read Jim’s post I couldn’t help but wonder if the reason Steve Jobs didn’t take on a project like an EHR was because our regulations and reimbursement don’t work in a human way.

Dr. Liu on Kevin MD wrote a post about Steve Jobs as a physician mentor. I love the idea that Steve Jobs was his mentor even though they never met. He offered this heartfelt thought:

I as a doctor I’m incredibly sorry that medicine has not yet evolved to the point that a cure exists for the rare type of cancer Jobs. I’m sorry that he is so ill at an incredibly young age, in his mid 50s, when many people begin to contribute even more to society with all of the knowledge and experience they’ve acquired. The future might be a little less bright without Jobs leading his team at Apple on creating products and experiences none of us truly knew existed until he showed them to us.

It is such a shame that he died so young. In fact, I’d say that might be the hardest part of it all.

The self professed Mac Fan boy, John Moore from Chilmark research, paid a tribute as well. He highlights some of the key things that Steve Jobs did with Apple products:
-Design aesthetics combined with functionality rule
-Supporting a renegade
-Systems rather than parts
-Supporting innovation

Yep, Steve Jobs will be missed in healthcare and well beyond.

Which EHR Certifying Body?

Posted on March 3, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Many of you will probably remember my post about Jim Tate and all his EHR certification experience. As I said in that post, Jim Tate knows his stuff when it comes to the EHR certification bodies (ONC-ATCB). So, I found his advice for EHR vendors on HITECH Answers pretty interesting when it comes to selecting which ONC-ATCB an EHR company should use.

You can go read the whole article, or here’s the Cliff notes version: Responsiveness and Support of the EHR certifying body is most important.

ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown by EHR Vendor

Posted on December 4, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is the third post in the series of posts(see the previous ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown and ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown by Certifying Body) looking at the EHR certification numbers put together by HITECH Answers. The following is a list of Certified EHR products by vendor:

Top 3 Vendors by number of Products Certified
– Cerner Corporation – 13 products
– Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc – 9 products
– Epic Systems Corporation – 4 products

I guess these are the EHR software you want to avoid. Ok, that’s partially facetious. Just, can you imagine trying to battle the other 12 certified EHR to get support. Granted, most of them are likely hospital EHR and so there are usually support contracts in place to deal with this kind of thing. Don’t worry though, Allscripts should be on this list soon. I think they have something like 7 EHR software for just ambulatory right now. I guess that’s the nature of acquisitions.

It will be interesting to continue to see this evolve.

ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown by Certifying Body

Posted on December 3, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is the second post in the series of posts (see the previous ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown) looking at the EHR certification numbers put together by HITECH Answers. The following is the breakdown of EHR Certification by Certifying body:

2 Certified by Infogard
– 1 Modular Ambulatory system
– 1 Modular Inpatient system
40 Certified by Drummond
– 15 Complete Ambulatory systems
– 5 Complete Inpatient systems
– 15 Modular Ambulatory systems
– 5 Modular Inpatient systems
88 Certified by CCHIT
– 50 Complete Ambulatory systems
– 15 Complete Inpatient systems
– 11 Modular Ambulatory systems
– 12 Modular Inpatient systems

Infogard is just getting started, but CCHIT and Drummond Group are cranking them out. I’m guessing right now demand for their service is strong and they can certify them as quick as they can. It will be interesting to see what happens to these organizations post EMR Stimulus money, but they have a few years before they have to worry about that.

Of course, this is only the temporary ONC EHR Certification. ONC will have the official one and then all the EMR vendors will likely have to re-certify again. Let’s call it the EHR certifying body stimulus program.

ONC-ATCB Certified EHR Breakdown

Posted on December 2, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Many people were worried that we wouldn’t have many certified EHR available for 2011. I wasn’t one of those people, but they were out there. Seems to me that this really won’t be an issue at all. There’s 130 partial or complete EHR companies on the official ONC certified EHR list. That’s a lot of software and it’s only the beginning of December. I expect we’ll have 200 or so more ONC-ATCB certified EHR software by the first quarter of 2011.

The good people at HITECH Answers have done the hard work putting together the number of systems certified. Check out the numbers:
85 Complete EHR
– 65 Ambulatory systems
– 20 Inpatient systems
45 Modular EHR
– 27 Ambulatory systems
– 18 Inpatient systems

That’s right. 65 Complete Certified Ambulatory EHR. 27 other modular certified EHR and I’m sure that many of those are just doing the modular as a stepping stone to the full certification.

Meaningful Use Rule by July 14th

Posted on July 8, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A favorite topic of this blog has been Meaningful Use and it will likely continue to be a popular topic well into the future. As such, we’re all sitting around waiting to hear the word from CMS on the final rule for Meaningful Use. Doctors are waiting for it so they can select an EMR or modify their current EMR to meet the guidelines. EMR vendors are waiting for it so they can say that their EMR software can meet the meaningful use guidelines. RECs are waiting for it so that they can help doctors reach meaningful use. We’re all just waiting to see what’s going to come out.

Fierce EMR reported that the Meaningful Use final rule will be published by July 14th. Here’s a couple quotes from that report:

FierceEMR spoke with a CMS official directly involved in writing and publishing the final regulation, and she assures us that although there’s no “official” publication date (CMS missed its own self-imposed June 30 deadline), “I would be very surprised if it’s published any later than July 14.”

Not a very firm commitment to July 14th, but it should be around that date I imagine.

“We hoped to have it out by the end of June, but it’s looking more like mid-July,” the official told us this week. “There are so many moving parts and so many people are involved. This is a long regulation.” No doubt! The proposed rule was thicker than many novels. We expect nothing less from the final reg.

That wasn’t quite the novel I was hoping to read this summer, but it will be nice to have something final.

All of this said, we may be waiting for nothing. First, because I don’t think that we’ll see any real meaningful changes to the regulation. Plus, I think the regulation will still be missing much of the meat and potatoes that will be involved in managing that regulation. There will still be a lot of practical details needed and interpretation of the regulation to be done. At least if it’s the government process that I know.

Relaxing of Meaningful Use Final Rule

Posted on June 25, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s a lot of interesting speculation going on right now around what HHS is going to do in regards to meaningful use. There’s no doubt that a lot of the feedback given to HHS on meaningful use surrounded the idea that it was too much and had too many objectives. The question remains, what will HHS do with this feedback?

A number of people have suggested that the meaningful use objectives will be relaxed. In this company is past healthcare IT czar, David Brailer. The interesting part of this chorus is that it includes a large number of providers that say it’s going to be relaxed. Then, they follow up that statement with something like, “If it’s not relaxed, then doctors won’t show meaningful use and will not worry about the EMR stimulus money.” Basically, it will become a failed government initiative if the meaningful use bar is too high.

Other people are suggesting that meaningful use is going to stay the same. Carol Flagg of HITECH Answers quotes the following from David Blumenthal as indication that meaningful use will not substantially change:

“Introducing change in health care is never easy. Historically, adopting our most fundamental medical technologies, from the stethoscope to the x-ray, were met with significant doubt and opposition. So it comes as no surprise that in the face of change as transformational as the adoption of health IT – even though it carries the promise of vastly improving the nation’s health care – some hospitals and providers push back….The question health care providers are facing today is whether we are pushing too hard, too fast to make this important change. I respectfully submit, no. In turn, I ask, ‘Can we make these changes expeditiously enough?… Every provider, every patient throughout our nation will benefit from the goals envisioned by the HITECH Act. Yes, this will be a challenge. While large hospital networks and smaller providers may be stretched to meet national health IT goals, it is not beyond their capacity for growth.”

Little by little I’m leaning this direction. I’m not sure exactly why, but I’m getting the feeling that HHS either can’t or won’t change the meaningful use criteria. It’s basically going to be similar to what we have now with maybe one or two items of note.

What do you think? What will happen with the MU final rule?