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Review of “Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” by Colin Hung

Posted on November 24, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr and SVP of Marketing at Patient Prompt.
Colin Hung
If Leonard Kish’s new eBook – http://www.hl7standards.com/kish-ebook/”>Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool was a song, it would be categorized as a “mashup” – and that’s a good thing.

Never heard a mashup song before? Just go to youtube.com and type it into the search bar and you’ll find thousands (or try this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbrWu8XyAcM). Mashups are a unique form of music. To make one, DJs will take snippets (called samples) from other songs usually from different artists and combine them into a single piece and in so doing create a whole new song in the process.

When done properly a mashup is both familiar and fresh. It has elements which you know and love yet the composition as a whole feels new. That is exactly what Kish has done in his eBook. He expertly weaves together numerous ideas, themes and approaches from different people and different industries into a single cohesive arrangement.

Kish starts by laying down a central idea that is carried like a melody from page 1 through to the end:

“The key to [patient] engagement in early stages is to get people’s attention and to let them see what’s possible by using the tools available to improve their health. It’s a process and a strategy, not a data set or any one tool”

With that idea track locked in, Kish proceeds to mix in concepts from:

  • Marketing – target audiences, key messages and clear calls-to-action
  • Product Management – inclusive design and agile development
  • Behavioral Science – Maslow’s hierarchy, social interaction and motivation

The eBook starts off strong with a nice definition of patient engagement – a rather amorphous term in healthcare right now –  and gets stronger with examples of successful “attention grabbing” marketing campaigns that could be adopted by healthcare organizations.

One particular statement that stands out:

“Engagement requires what marketers know very well: motivation, context and messaging.”

As a person who works in HealthIT Marketing, I’m tickled by this statement…but I think Kish is giving those of us in Marketing a bit too much credit. Although it is true that marketers should have a good grasp of our target audiences (their needs, wants, motivations and fears) – we are not seers. In fact, it is common for marketers to be a little “off key” when approaching new markets or when working with new products.

Truly successful marketers are the ones who are open to being wrong…and who can quickly adapt their messages/approach based on real data and feedback from the target audience. Like a good DJ, you must read the reaction of the audience and change the tune in order to keep things hopping.

The idea of iterating, fitting engagement into the world of the patient (context) and using feedback are the themes that fill the middle portion of Kish’s eBook. Using anecdotes, quotes and statistics from a wide array of leaders he encourages readers to draw parallels with healthcare and to think critically on how that wisdom from outsiders can be applied successfully in their own organizations.

Fittingly there is a section that draws a parallel between healthcare and music. Kish quotes former Talking Heads singer David Byrne in a particularly memorable and interesting chapter.

The finale is where “Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” shines. Having laid the ground work in the prior chapters on why getting patients’ attention is so critical and how difficult it can be to turn that attention into meaningful behavior change, Kish closes by giving readers 10 concrete steps to follow to “win the attention war” in healthcare:

  1. Know what health problem you are trying to solve
  2. Know whose attention you’re trying to get
  3. Use social tools
  4. Know behavior models and behavioral economics
  5. Focus on goals and narratives
  6. Start Simple
  7. Try something and measure results
  8. Understand context
  9. Take an open approach
  10. Follow an analysis-driven implementation plan

I was hoping for a little more depth from Kish on the Agile approach, especially as it relates to A/B testing, iterative design and high reliance on real-user feedback – something that I believe could DEFINITELY be used in healthcare – but perhaps he is keeping these concepts for his next composition.

Overall, Kish’s eBook is a solid mix of familiar theories/approaches from other industries and new ideas/success stories from within healthcare. It offers insight and practical advice on how to change from a tools-based approach to patient engagement to a process and strategy based one. If you work in healthcare and are involved in your organization’s patient experience, access or engagement initiatives this eBook should be on your reading list.

I am looking forward to Kish’s next release – which I hope drops soon.

“Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” can be downloaded for free courtesy of the good folks at HL7 Standards (http://www.hl7standards.com/kish-ebook/)

#20HIT Comments on Health IT by HL7 Standards

Posted on September 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Many of you know that I’m extremely active on social media (see @techguy and @ehrandhit to start). I love the way it can connect people. It’s so powerful. One of the companies that’s done an amazing job with social media for their company is Corepoint Health and their HL7 Standards blog. The blog is most notable for being the home and birthplace of the #HITsm chat. If you haven’t participated in an #HITsm chat, then you’re missing out. Lots of great health IT discussions every Friday.

Along with being the home of the #HITsm chat, the HL7 Standards blog is a great place to find blog posts from voices throughout the #HITsm community. Plus, they recently started doing a series of “20 Questions for Health IT” with responses from a variety of health IT professional. Check out an example tweet and question that was answered by Mandi Bishop (better known as @MandiBPro):

I love the work their doing and I love hearing perspectives from across the industry. I’m going to think about ways I can do something like they’re doing to bring and amplify more of the interesting voices in healthcare IT. Nice work HL7 Standards.

4 Healthcare IT Blogs

Posted on July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been having some fun highlighting some of my fellow health IT blogging colleagues (see 5 Health IT bloggers I highlighted previously). What’s been kind of sad about the experience is that so many health IT bloggers have stopped blogging. I started bookmarking the various EHR and health IT bloggers that I came across a few years back. As I’ve been going back through that list, it’s been really amazing how many stopped or even removed their blog completely.

Even so, there are still quite a few healthcare IT bloggers that are writing some great content. Here’s a look at 4 more health IT bloggers that I find interesting.

Venture Valkyrie – This blog is written by Lisa Suennen, but I have to admit that I didn’t even know that was her real name. I’ve just always seen her as Venture Valkyrie. With an awesome name like that, I’m not sure why she’d ever use the name Lisa. Anyway, Venture Valkyrie is a venture capital investor and healthcare industry consultant. She brings a lot of interesting perspective and insight into healthcare, investing, innovation, entrepreneurship and the role of women in all of these.

Dr. Mike Sevilla – Dr. Sevilla originally started his social media efforts as The Doctor Anonymous, before he came out from behind the cover of anonymity to share his thoughts on medicine, social media and life. Dr. Sevilla is a family practice doctor who’s been involved in social media since 2005. He’s tried to stop blogging and other social media and he can’t stay away. That’s just my kind of blogger.

HL7 Standards – This blog is run by the Corepoint Health team and is also home to the #HITsm Twitter chat topics. While Corepoint Health manages the blog, they do a good job connecting with outside experts (many they probably find through their hosting the #HITsm chat) to cover interesting topics on the blog. In fact, if i didn’t tell you the blog was run by Corepoint Health, you’d probably not even know it. I love that they’ve taken the thought leadership and relationship approach to blog marketing.

Schwartz MSL Blog – This isn’t a purely health IT blog, but it covers a lot of healthcare IT topics since many of Schwartz’s clients are healthcare IT companies. Along with covering their experience working in healthcare IT, they also offer some interesting insights into the PR, marketing and social media worlds that I’m sure many readers will find interesting and useful.

Health IT in 2013 – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on January 5, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One:  How can apps help people keep their health resolutions?

Topic Two:  What health app do you use today, and how has it helped you become more engaged in your health?

Topic Three: Speaking of engaged, if you could tell the ONC to do one thing in 2013, what would it be, and what result would it produce?

Topic Four: Who will have the biggest impact in #healthIT in 2013 – hospitals, vendors, consultants, government, trade associations, others?

Meaningful Use and Big Data, Payment Reform, and Evidence-Generated Medicine – #HITsm Highlights

Posted on October 27, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Is Meaningful Use enabling big data in health care? Why or Why Not? #bigdata

Topic Two: Will payment reform make data sharing a strategic imperative? Why or Why Not?

T3: What are the most underutilized sources of data in health care? #bigdata

Topic Four: What data might be used for evidence-generated medicine?

EHR Incentives, Smart Bed Technology, and Remotoscope — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on October 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This weeks #HITsm chat was hosted by John, which was exciting to observe. If you’ve been keeping up with the different sites from Health Care Scene, some of these topics might seem similar. Be sure to tune in every Friday at noon EST, and join the conversation with #HITsm.

Topic One: A few in congress called for a halt on EHR incentives. Is this politics or something more? Are their observations founded? 

Topic Two: Allscripts is the 2nd EHR vendor to discontinue their small practice EHR (MyWay), is this a trend and what’s the impact of it? 

 Topic Three: Is the hospital bed the ultimate medical device monitor? What other med device monitors do you see on the horizon? 

Topic Four: What do you think of the remotoscope which allows you to diagnose ear infections at home using your iPhone? 

Meaningful Use Stage 2, Reduced Patient Engagement, #HITsm Role in Creating Communities – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on September 1, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: What are your general thoughts on the final rules for Meaningful Use Stage 2? Positives? Negatives? 

 

 

 

Topic Two: Is the 5% reduced patient engagement threshold more a reflection of what is achievable or a cave to outside pressure?

 

 

 

Topic Three: What has prevented widespread adoption of coordinated care? Are the barriers technology, process, or people? 

 

 

 

Topic Four: What role does #HITsm play in creating communities to create skills that improve health before illness occurs? a la, #Salutogenesis

 

Price Transparency, ROI of Health IT, Technology Training, and Social Media Acceptance – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on August 18, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: Considering costs with mobile technology: How can mobile technology apps and crowdsourcing approaches be used to enable price transparency?

 

 

 

 

Topic Two: ROI of health IT: How will moving away from a fee-for-service model in healthcare affect the substantial price tag of health IT?

 

 

 

Topic Three: How can technology be used to train future caregivers to consider costs before ordering tests and treatments?

 

 

 

 

Topic Four: Can social media acceptance and use among younger caregivers lead to lower patient costs?

 

Grab Bag of Tweets:

 

Fixing EMR Drawbacks

Posted on October 17, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now enjoys writing about healthcare, science and technology.

FierceHealthIT editor Ken Terry had a recent post on the need for better human-computer interfaces in EMRs. He highlighted a few areas where EMRs could stand some improvement, and I thought they were bang on. These are aspects I’ve thought about a great deal myself, and true to the Steve Jobs dictum of staying foolish, I’m offering some solutions to these oft-mentioned problems. I’m sure there are plenty of people who have already thought of these and better solutions, but here we go:

1) Initial Data Entry – The biggest headache for providers’ offices today is what to do with all those boxes of medical records. Scanning solutions exist but they leave you with unstructured data. Manual extraction is time-consuming and requires upfront investment. I’ve pondered for a while about this. I think on-demand data extraction might be the way to go. Provider offices know ahead of time what their weekly, even monthly appointments are. If a provider’s office digitizes the records of patients with upcoming appointments every week, it should have most of its records digitized by end of year. This is assuming patients make it to the doctor’s office for at least once-a-year appointments if not more. If the office outsources this work, it needs some monetary investment, no doubt, but such a setup might be affordable since it is pay-as-you-go.

2) Templating – Terry states that many doctors hate the templates that come with most EMRs. And templates make it easy to generate pages and pages of verbiage which say exactly the same thing for patients with similar profiles, or say very little that is meaningful. Surely customizable or extensible templates can get rid of this problem. Or speech-to-text dictation that allows the doctor to mirror practices from not so long ago.

3) Alert Overload – Many EMRs are designed to issue alerts for adverse drug interactions, prompts for patients and similar such decision support tools. But too few of these and you risk not asking the right questions. Too many providers just ignore them, or worse, override them. No easy solutions for this one, except maybe to figure out where the fine line lies between lack of decision support and too many alerts.

4) Interoperability – EMRs cannot talk to each other. So a patient who moves from one provider to another is really at the mercy of software whimsies. Or worse. For providers, it’s equally frustrating not to be able to get ahold of the patient records in a format suitable for their particular EMR software. One simple answer – standards. Granted HL7 is still evolving, but EMR vendors need to at least consider offering data exports in this format.

#HITsm Twitter Chat

Posted on February 13, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case some of you aren’t on Twitter, there’s this interesting conversation around healthcare IT and social media each Monday. It goes by the hashtag #HITsm chat. Ok, if that’s too technical for you, just click this link tomorrow night and you’ll see some interesting healthcare IT and social media chat happening on Twitter. Don’t be afraid. You don’t even have to have a Twitter account to read along.

If you want to join the conversation and add your 140 characters worth, then you will have to sign up for a free Twitter account.

Erica Olenski at HL7 Standards added the following thoughts about the conversations happening at #HITsm and how more people need to be made aware of them. Consider this my Valentine’s gift to Erica!!

In last week’s #HITsm chat, a key topic was discussed regarding public awareness of healthcare IT initiatives. It was emphasized throughout the conversation that if the public was aware of the initiatives taking place in health care and health IT, their expectation would be instrumental in driving the interoperability initiatives in health care.

A major set back to public awareness, though, is that many health IT projects include jargon and complex systems that only emphasize the disconnect between health IT professional understanding and the public understanding.

Out of the conversation, #HITsm was assigned its first ever homework assignment to tell one unaware e-patient about a health IT initiative. Therefore, in the spirit of Valentine’s day, feel free to invite a friend (patient, provider or professional) to join the chat so they can ask questions, learn and provide an additional voice to the #HITsm community.