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Interoperability vs. Coordinated Care

Posted on August 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Andy Oram asked me the following question, “Is the exchange of continuity of care documents really interoperability or coordinated care?

As it stands now, it seems like CCDs (continuity of care documents) are going to be the backbone of what healthcare information we exchange. We’ll see if something like Common Well changes this, but for now much of the interoperability of healthcare data is in CCDs (lab and radiology data are separate). The question I think Andy is asking is what can we really accomplish with CCDs?

Transferring a CCD from one doctor to the next is definitely a form of healthcare interoperability. Regardless of the form of the CCD, it would be a huge step in the right direction for all of the healthcare endpoints to by on a system that can share documents. Whether they share CCDs or start sharing other data doesn’t really matter. That will certainly evolve over time. Just having everyone so they can share will be of tremendous value.

It’s kind of like the fax machine or email. Just getting people on the system and able to communicate was the first step. What people actually send through those channels will continue to improve over time. However, until everyone was on email, it had limited value. This is the first key step to interoperable patient records.

The second step is what information is shared. In the forseeable future I don’t seeing us ever reaching a full standard for all healthcare data. Sure, we can do a pretty good job putting together a standard for Lab results, Radiology, RXs, Allergies, Past Medical History, Diagnosis, etc. I’m not sure we’ll ever get a standard for the narrative sections of the chart. However, that doesn’t mean we can’t make that information interoperable. We can, are, and will share that data between systems. It just won’t be in real granular way that many would love to see happen.

The idea of coordinated care is a much harder one. I honestly haven’t seen any systems out there that have really nailed what a coordinated care system would look like. I’ve seen very specific coordinated care elements. Maybe if we dug into Kaiser’s system we’d find some coordinated care. However, the goal of most software systems haven’t been to coordinate care and so we don’t see much on the market today that achieves this goal.

The first step in coordinating care is opening the lines of communication between care providers. Technology can really make an impact in this area. Secure text message company like docBeat (which I advise), are making good head way in opening up these lines of communications. It’s amazing the impact that a simple secure text message can have on the care a patient receives. Secure messaging will likely be the basis of all sorts of coordinated care.

The challenge is that secure messaging is just the start of care coordination. Healthcare is so far behind that secure messaging can make a big impact, but I’m certain we can create more sophisticated care coordination systems that will revolutionize healthcare. The biggest thing holding us back is that we’re missing the foundation to build out these more sophisticated models.

Let me use a simple example. My wife has been seeing a specialist recently. She’s got an appointment with her primary care doctor next week. I’ll be interested to see how much information my wife’s primary care doctor has gotten from the specialist. Have they communicated at all? Will my wife’s visit to her primary care doctor be basically my wife informing her primary care doctor about what the specialist found?

I think the answers to these questions are going to be disappointing. What’s even more disappointing is that what I described is incredibly basic care coordination. However, until the basic care coordination starts to happen we’ll never reach a more advanced level of care coordination.

Going back to Andy’s question about CCDs and care coordination. No doubt a CCD from my wife’s specialist to her primary care doctor would meet the basic care coordination I described. Although, does it provide an advanced level of care coordination? It does not. However, it does lay the foundation for advanced care coordination. What if some really powerful workflow was applied to the incoming CCD that made processing incoming CCDs easier for doctors? What if the CCD also was passed to any other doctors that might be seeing that patient based upon the results that were shared in the CCD? You can start to see how the granular data of a CCD can facilitate care coordination.

I feel like we’re on the precipice where everyone knows that we have to start sharing data. CCD is the start of that sharing, but is far from the end of how sophisticated will get at truly coordinated care.

100% Interoperability, Quantified Self Data, and Data Liquidity – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on March 30, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic 1: Do you think the healthcare system WANTS 100% interoperability & data liquidity? Why/why not?

 

Topic 2: As consumer, what are YOUR fears about your health data being shared across providers/payers/government?

 

Topic 3: What do you think payers will do with #quantifiedself data if integrated into EHR? Actuarial/underwriting?

 

Topic 4: Could there be a correlation between your fear of data liquidity and your health?

 

Topic 5: What could assuage your fears? Education? Legislation? Regulation? Healthcare system withdrawal?

Opportunities For mHealth In The Future: #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on January 19, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Where areas hold the biggest opportunities for #mHealth apps? Consumer health? Apps for providers? Apps for insurers?

Topic Two: How can we deliver #mHealth apps with the quality healthcare consumers expect? Is it best to focus on non-regulated areas?

Topic Three: When do you see #mHealth really hitting the mainstream? What needs to happen/change first?

Topic Four: Other than #eHealth accelerators, how can we bolster innovation in the #mHealth space?

Health IT in 2013 – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on January 5, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One:  How can apps help people keep their health resolutions?

Topic Two:  What health app do you use today, and how has it helped you become more engaged in your health?

Topic Three: Speaking of engaged, if you could tell the ONC to do one thing in 2013, what would it be, and what result would it produce?

Topic Four: Who will have the biggest impact in #healthIT in 2013 – hospitals, vendors, consultants, government, trade associations, others?

From #AMIA: Interoperability Held Back By Politics

Posted on November 12, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

When a recent AMIA panel was asked why health IT interoperability was still in its infant stages, members’ responses were the same we’ve been hearing for, I don’t know, a decade or more.  Let’s say that there didn’t seem to have been a lot of hope in the room.

According to Healthcare IT News, true interoperability between health systems is still beyond us due to the same-old, same-old reasons:  Hospitals with hundreds of systems, vendors with proprietary databases, varied standards, health systems that don’t want to share data and a lack of interoperability support from policymakers.

Ultimately, the fact that these obstacles haven’t been overcome is as much a matter of politics as integration problems, the magazine reports:

Charles Jaffe, MD, CEO of standards development organization Health Level Seven International (HL7) described a “circle of blame” involving government agencies and regulators, hospitals and healthcare systems, technology vendors, clinicians, academicians like those at AMIA and, yes, standards development organizations (SDOs), such as HL7. “The policy always preempts the technology,” said Jaffe.

My feeling is that this circle of blame would dissolve in a millisecond if a compelling financial case could be made for interoperability.  Anything might help at this point.

Hey, just prove that interoperability saved a health system $2 a patient somehow, and they might be made to invest in needed changes. Or convince vendors that they’d move even a few units of their product if their systems were freely interoperable, and they’d probably be more cooperative.

At this point though,  you’ve got cross-cutting turf wars going on, with vendors and health systems and standards organizations each pursuing an agenda of their own. And honestly, why shouldn’t they?

With plenty of financial and institutional risk involved, and questionable rewards, I’m not sure how gung-ho I’d be on interoperability if I were a healthcare CIO or vendor exec.

Bottom line: If you want interoperability, it’s got to have a more tangible payoff for everyone involved.

ACA Implications, Hurricane Sandy, and Interoperability — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on November 10, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Obama’s re-election secures the future of the #ACA, but what changes/concessions are we likely to see during its rollout?

Topic Two: What #healthIT strengths and weaknesses did Hurricane Sandy expose?

Topic Three: What business continuity/disaster recovery strides do health providers still need to make?

 

Topic Four: A national #HIE would have come in handy during #Sandy, so why does the industry still fail to embrace interoperability?

 

 

Meaningful Use and Big Data, Payment Reform, and Evidence-Generated Medicine – #HITsm Highlights

Posted on October 27, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Is Meaningful Use enabling big data in health care? Why or Why Not? #bigdata

Topic Two: Will payment reform make data sharing a strategic imperative? Why or Why Not?

T3: What are the most underutilized sources of data in health care? #bigdata

Topic Four: What data might be used for evidence-generated medicine?

Upcoding, Presidential Debates, and MU Incentives– #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on September 29, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: Big debate now about EHRs sparking upcoding if not fraud. What’s your take? Will inverse be true with digitized health system?

 

 

 

Topics Two: 59% of IT execs say staff shortages harm earning of MU incentives. What is long-term impact if feds HIT education lag demand?

 

 

 

 

Topic Three: What would you ask Obama or Romney about HealthIT, reform law, or healthcare in general during the Oct. 3 debate? 

 

 

 

 

Topic Four: Health IT projects: Which ones are you postponing until after the election? 

 

Health IT Galore Wrapping Up #NHITWeek — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on September 15, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: Fill in the blank: Health IT is _____. 

 

 

 

 

 

Topic Two: What is the most important message consumers need to know about health IT?

 

 

 

 

Topic Three: Who is the most important driver of educating patients about the use of technology in healthcare?

 

 

 

 

Topic Four: What can be done to improve National Health IT Week for both professionals and the general public? 

 

 

Meaningful Use Stage 2, Reduced Patient Engagement, #HITsm Role in Creating Communities – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on September 1, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: What are your general thoughts on the final rules for Meaningful Use Stage 2? Positives? Negatives? 

 

 

 

Topic Two: Is the 5% reduced patient engagement threshold more a reflection of what is achievable or a cave to outside pressure?

 

 

 

Topic Three: What has prevented widespread adoption of coordinated care? Are the barriers technology, process, or people? 

 

 

 

Topic Four: What role does #HITsm play in creating communities to create skills that improve health before illness occurs? a la, #Salutogenesis