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Low-Profile HIT Player Leidos A Major Presence

Posted on June 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Here where I live in the Washington, DC metro, federal IT is a major presence. Government IT consulting firms cluster along the area’s highways, and their executives own countless sprawling manses in the nearby suburbs. Those players include Leidos, a northern Virginia-based contracting firm with clients in IT, biomedical research and public health.

Though the firm has annual revenues of about $5.1 billion, and 18,000 employees, Leidos generates little fanfare here, despite a pedigree that includes a $5 billion partnership with Lockheed Martin’s Information Systems & Global Solutions segment that provides IT and intelligence services. However, Leidos is actually the new identity of long-established power player SAIC, which restructured and changed its name in late 2013 and has deep roots in national security and government IT contracting.

Most readers probably care little about government IT unless they service that industry. But I’d argue that we should all know about Leidos Health which, among other distinctions, was part of the team (Cerner, Leidos and Accenture Federal) that won the $4.3 billion plus contract to implement an EMR for the US Department of Defense last summer.

The DoD contract was hotly contested, by teams that included an Epic, IBM and Impact Advisors combination, but the Cerner-fronted team pulled off a win that may have saved the EMR vendor’s brand in a brutally competitive market. While it’s not clear what role Leidos played in the win, a DoD official was quoted as saying that a Cerner deal was projected to be “much cheaper,” and it’s possible Leidos support pricing played some role in its calculations. Perhaps more tellingly, DoD officials said cybersecurity considerations played a major role in the award, which plays to Leidos’ strengths.

Leidos Health hasn’t had unmitigated success. Most recently, it was part of a team scheduled to assist with a little-mentioned Epic EMR rollout for the US Coast Guard, which was cancelled due to “various irregularities.” The Coast Guard, which pulled the plug on the rollout in April, had been planning its EMR implementation since 2010.

However, this probably wasn’t much of a setback. And Leidos still delivers health IT services to several other federal agencies, including HHS and the Department of Veterans Affairs, including cybersecurity, health analytics, IT infrastructure and support and software development. And it works with the gamut of enterprise EMR vendors, including Allscripts, Cerner, Epic, McKesson and Meditech.

Truth be told, Leidos may not deserve the “quiet company” label given to it by Healthcare Informatics magazine, which recently dubbed it one the most interesting vendors of 2016. I’m sure Beltway execs who compete for federal contracts are well aware of Leidos Health, which had annual revenues of $593 million last year. And government IT decision-makers are well acquainted with parent company SAIC, a pillar of federal contracting which has been in the business since 1969. (In fact, SAIC president of technology and engineering Deborah Lee James was sworn in as Secretary of the Air Force in late 2013.)

That being said, the DoD deal has dramatically raised Leidos Health’s visibility in the broader health IT world. It will be interesting to see what it does going forward, don’t you think?

Background On Cerner’s Capture Of DoD EHR Data Center Biz

Posted on January 6, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

As many readers will know, the Department of Defense awarded Cerner the $4.3 billion Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization contract this summer, through its partnership with Leidos and Accenture. In doing so the partners beat out some formidable competition, including an Epic/IBM bid and a group, led by Computer Sciences Corp., whose partners included Allscripts and HP.

This is a system integration project on the grandest scale, connecting healthcare systems located at Army hospitals, on Naval vessels, in battlefield clinics across the glove. The idea is to bring all of this data — on active-duty members, reservists and civilian contractors — into a single open, interoperable platform. The new platform should serve 9.5 million military beneficiaries in roughly 1,000 locations.

Now, just six months into the 10-year deal, the DoD has decided to change the rules a bit. Military officials have concluded that the new records system capabilities won’t function at their best unless they’re hosted in a Center datacenter. The new system, officials said, “requires direct access to proprietary Cerner data, which is only available within Cerner-owned-and-operated data centers.”

I’m not sharing this tidbit because it nets the partnership more money — Cerner will take in a comparatively trivial $5 million per year to host the government health data — but for a few other reasons that offer ongoing perspective on this massive deal:

  • While there’s no concrete way to prove this, the buzz around the time of Cerner winning the contract was that it won because it was perceived as more open than Epic. Arguably, if the DoD has to transfer data hosting because it needs access to proprietary algorithms, maybe the whole open thing was a fake-out. Certainly, needing access to Cerner logic locks down the deal even further than a straight ahead contract award.
  • Why couldn’t the DoD anticipate that their own data centers wouldn’t meet the needs of the project?  And why didn’t planners know, in advance, that they’d need access to Cerner’s “quantitative models and strategies” prior to signing on the dotted line? Admittedly, this is a sprawling project, but planning for appropriate network architecture seems pretty basic to me. Did Cerner deliberately raise this issue only after the deal was done?
  • In the notice the DoD issued outlining its intention to shift hosting to Cerner, it noted that while it wasn’t seeking competitive proposals, “any firm believing that they can fulfill the requirement of providing these services may be considered by the Agency.” The key for late entrants would be to prove that they could both meet hosting requirements and connect to proprietary Cerner data.
  • Was the intent always to host the EHR at the Cerner data centers and this was a way to do an end around the bid process and make the initial bid look more attractive (ie. cheaper) so it won the contract? I wonder how many more of these late additions the DoD will have when implementing the Cerner EHR. We’ve seen many hospital EHR implementation budgets have skyrocketed. It’s not hard to imagine the same scenario playing out with the DoD EHR budget. This might be the first of many EHR add-ons that weren’t part of the original contract.

The Dawn of The Community EMR

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While many healthcare stakeholders would like to see clinical data shared freely, the models we have in place simply can’t get this done.

Take private HIEs, for example. Some of them have been quite successful at fostering data sharing between different parts of a health system, but the higher clinical functions aren’t integrated — just the data.

Another dead end comes when a health system uses a single EMR across its entire line of properties. That may integrate clinical workflow to some degree, but far too often, the different instances of the EMR can’t share data directly.

If healthcare is to transform itself, a new platform will be necessary which can be both the data-sharing and clinical tool needed for every healthcare player in a community. Consider the vision laid out by Forbes contributor Dave Chase:

Just as the previous wars impacted which countries would lead the world in prosperity, the “war” we are in will dictate the communities that get the lion’s share of the jobs (and thus prosperity). Smart economic development directors and mayors will stake their claim to be the place where healthcare gets reinvented.

In Chase’s column, he notes that companies like IBM have begun to base their decisions about where to locate new technology centers partly on how efficiently, effectively and affordably care can be delivered in that community. For example, the tech giant recently decided to locate 4,000 new jobs in Dubuque, Iowa after concluding that the region offered the best value for their healthcare dollar.

To compete with the Dubuques of the world, Chase says, communities will need to pool their existing healthcare spending — ideally $1B or more — and use it to transform how their entire region delivers care.

While Chase doesn’t mention this, one element which will be critical in building smart healthcare communities is an EMR that works as both a workflow and care coordination tool AND a platform for sharing data. I can’t imagine how entire communities can rebuild their care without sharing a single tool like this.

A few years ago I wrote about how the next generation of  EMRs would probably be architected as a platform with a stack of apps built over it that suit individual organizations. The idea doesn’t seem to have gained a lot of traction in the U.S. since 2012, but the approach is very much alive outside the country, with vendors like Australia’s Ocean Informatics selling this type of technology to government entities around the world. And maybe it can bring cities and regions together too.

For the short term, getting a community of providers to go all in on such an architecture doesn’t seem too likely. Instead, they’ll cling to ACO models which offer at least an illusion of independence. But when communities that offer good healthcare value start to steal their patients and corporate customers, they may think again.

Will EHR Vendors Become Service and Consulting Companies?

Posted on October 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is the topic of a really interesting LinkedIn discussion: Will EHR Vendors Become Service and Consulting Companies?

I think this is a really great question and one that’s worthy of serious consideration. I think we’ve seen this happen time and time again in the IT industry. Some of the best examples are IBM, HP, and Dell. As their IT hardware and software becomes a “commodity” then they leverage their relationships and domain expertise to change into a service and consulting company. Usually this also involves them spending their extra cash to acquire the leading consulting company (or companies) in the industry as well.

In some ways we’re already seeing this happen. Epic announced a consulting division of their company in order to retain their senior staff. Cerner’s always made a good chunk of their money from consulting services.

Of course, thanks to meaningful use incentive money and some still massive upgrade costs, EHR vendors haven’t needed to shift their business model to a service and consulting model yet. There’s still plenty of money to be made just selling the software, training, etc.

What will also be interesting to watch is whether the large service and consulting companies like Accenture, IBM, HP, Dell, etc. will eat up the market share so that the EHR companies don’t have as much of an opportunity to grow a service and consulting business. No doubt it will be a big dog fight. Not to mention many of the current EHR consulting companies (although, you could see many of these getting acquired by the EHR vendors).

I guess my short answer to this question is: In the short term, we’re not likely to see a massive shift towards services and consulting, but long term it’s very likely to happen. What are your thoughts?

Allscripts And Team Battle Epic and IBM for DoD Contract

Posted on June 27, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Earlier this month,we shared the news that Epic and IBM had gotten together to fight for the DoD’s massive Healthcare Management Systems  Modernization project. The project is to replace the current Military Health System, which should serve some 9.7 million beneficiaries.  The winning team should make about $11 billion to do the work.

So it’s little wonder that another group of health IT giants have stepped up to fight for such a juicy prize.  A group lead by Computer Sciences Corp., whose partners include Allscripts and HP, has announced that it intends to compete for the contract.

The HMSM project is extremely ambitious. It’s intended to connect varied healthcare systems across the globe, located at Army hospitals, on Naval vessels, in battlefield clinics and more, into a single open, interoperable platform serving not only active-duty members, but also reservists and civilian contractors.

Before you burst out laughing at the idea that any EMR vendor could pull this off, it’s worth considering that perhaps their partners can.  It’s hard to argue that CSC has a long track record in both government and private sector health IT work, and HP has 50 years with of experience in developing IT projects military health and VA projects.

That being said, one has to wonder whether Allscripts — which is boasting of bringing an open architecture to the project — can really put his money where its mouth is. (One could say the same of Epic, which frequently describes its platform as interoperable but has a reputation of being interoperable only from one Epic installation to the other.)

To be fair, both project groups have about as much integration firepower as anyone on earth. Maybe, if the winner manages to create an interoperable platform for the military, they’ll bring that to private industry and will see some real information sharing there.

That being said, I remain skeptical that the DoD is going to get what it’s paying for; as far as I know, there is no massively interoperable platform in existence that meets the specs this project has.  That’s not an absolute dealbreaker, but it should raise some eyebrows.

Bottom line, the DoD seems determined to give it a try, regardless of the shaky state of interoperability in the industry overall. And its goals seem to be the right ones. After all, who  wouldn’t want an open platform that lends itself to future change and development?  Sadly, however, I think it’s more likely that will be shaking our heads over the collapse of the project some years from now.

Epic Joins IBM To Pitch DoD Contract

Posted on June 19, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Hoping to be the lucky vendors that win a massive pending DoD deal, Epic Systems has team up with global technology giant IBM to compete for the DoD’s Healthcare’s Management Systems Modernization contract.

The new project comes after years of  struggles and changes of direction by the DoD, which has worked for years to integrate its system with the VA’s EMR. Back in 2009, the two giant federal agencies kicked off an effort to create an integrated medical record, the iEHR, which would offer every service member the ability to maintain a single EMR throughout their career and lifetime. But those efforts failed miserably, and the iEHR project was halted in February 2013.

Since then, the DoD has announced that it’s moving along with its iEHR plans once again, a sprawling project which the Interagency Program Office estimates the cost somewhere between $8 billion and $12 billion.

Meanwhile, the DoD Healthcare Management Systems Modernization is moving ahead, slated to replace the current Military Health System. The DHMSM should serve some 9.7 million beneficiaries.

The two partners certainly bring a strong bench to the table. Epic offers an interoperable platform which is one of the most adopted EMR systems in the country, and according to company officials,its open architecture supports more than 20 billion data transactions between systems every year.  Epic says that its customer community, which currently includes 100 million patients, exchanges more than 2.2 million records each month with of the EMR vendors, HISPs, HIEs, the VA, DoD and Social Security Administration.

IBM, meanwhile,is contributing its system integration, change management and expertise , ad experiments in delivering large-scale solutions in partnership with complementary software and services providers. IBM’s Federal Healthcare practice will lead the effort, backed by IBM global information technology,research and health care organizations which already collaborate with Epic in support of EMR solutions internationally.

Without a doubt, IBM is the grandfather of all big iron providers, so they don’t have a lot to prove.  And Epic is a clear leader in the enterprise EMR space, by some measures leading the pack by a considerable margin. It’s likely they’re a top contender for the job.

If the DoD does indeed choose the partnership of Epic and IBM to make its health IT transition, it seems likely that they’ll have recruited more than enough firepower to get the job done — though there’s always the question of whether Epic, which is used to bossing hospitals around, will function as well when the big bureaucracy of the DoD is calling the shots.

But what’s more worrisome is whether the DoD will work effectively with these two private sector companies, assuming t hey win the bid. As noted, the DoD’s track record with change management is nothing to write home about, to say the least, and bureaucratic waffling could conceivably undermine even the most expert efforts to bring DoD’s healthcare architecture into the future. As big and powerful as they are, IBM and Epic may be in for one heckuva ride. In fact, John’s even suggested that the best thing for Epic might be for them to not win the DoD EHR contract.

Is Your EHR Stupid?

Posted on March 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yes, I know it’s a bit of a salacious title, but I think it’s an important question. Although, the answer to the question is completely obvious. Yes, your EHR is stupid.

At least the current state of EHR software is a bunch of dumb data repositories of healthcare information. That’s not to say that EHR software today doesn’t have value. The current EHR software can have tremendous value as I’ve been highlighting in my EHR benefit series. Although, just because something is useful and beneficial, doesn’t make it smart and also doesn’t mean we’re anywhere near the potential benefits that EHR will provide.

It’s worth considering a quick look back at how we got to where we are in the EHR world. First, EHR’s (really EMR if we’re splitting hairs) were created to be big billing engines. Since that was their goal, they got really good at it. In fact, the ugly spew of information that we know as templated notes came out of this desire to meet billing requirements easily.

In the next stage of EHR’s history, we layered on EHR certification and meaningful use. That’s right, EHR vendors went from coding software to increase a doctor’s ability to bill to now creating software that meets a set of government regulatory requirements.

Considering this history, is it really any wonder why we’re having a discussion of the EHR backlash that we see happening today?

While many might think this is a doom and gloom perspective. I’m actually incredibly optimistic about the future of EHR and the impact for good it can have on healthcare. Why am I optimistic?

My optimism stems from a number of different areas. First, I have tremendous respect for the creativity of people. I’m certain that we as a people will come up with EHR solutions that benefit healthcare greatly. Second, I think the “stupid EHR” that we have today lay the groundwork for all of the future benefits that will come.

This second point is a very important one. Most of the time people look at innovative ideas and think that they just came out of no where. Instead, when you start to study innovation you realize that most of the very best innovations have come from a mixture of small changes that are put together in a way that no one could have conceived before. I think we’ll see this applied to the EHR world.

The best example of this is what the IBM Watson technology is doing in healthcare. It’s great that a technology like Watson can take in so much information. However, Watson wouldn’t be able to learn anything about healthcare if the data wasn’t in digital form. That’s right, the simple process of having medical knowledge available in electronic form is an essential building block for something as powerful as Watson. The same is true for Watson’s analysis of a patient’s chart. How could Watson analyze a patient if all of their patient information was stuck in an offline world? Each move into the electronic world facilitates the next layer of innovation.

Yes, your EHR is stupid, but that’s ok. Just wait until you see the creative ways entrepreneurs and innovators will take your stupid EHR and make it smart.

If you have examples of this, I’d love to see them. If you have ideas of how to make a smart EHR, I’d love to hear them.

AT&T/IBM Deal Pushes Cloud Back into the Healthcare Spotlight

Posted on October 10, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I remember 2010 as if it were yesterday. I was somewhat new to the healthcare industry, attending my first Healthcare IT Summit, and trying to make sense of all the buzzwords flying around as a result of the HITECH Act being passed the year before. Cloud computing was definitely a hot topic – one that seems to have stood the test of time in the intervening years. Granted, I think its popularity has been somewhat superceded by phrases like mobile health, accountable care, patient engagement and electronic medical records (of course) over the last 18 months, but a recent flurry of cloud-related headlines may forecast a resurgence.

A report released earlier this year from MarketsandMarkets predicts that conditions are ripe for cloud computing to grow at an annual rate of 20.5 percent from this 2012 to 2017. (Bloomberg Businessweek puts the current market for cloud services at $14 billion.) The forecast makes a lot of sense when you look at it from the healthcare angle of Meaningful Use and EMRs. Providers, despite a few legislators’ recent objections, will likely continue to implement and attest during the next few years, leaving healthcare IT vendors – including those who put their EHRs in the cloud (Allscripts, NextGen and athenahealth are just a few that come to mind) – with no shortage of business opportunity.

And there are even more vendors behind those – the infrastructure folks like Verizon (See their recently announced HIPAA compliant cloud service) and Dell that provide the cloud’s backbone, so to speak. You may by now have seen headlines announcing that AT&T has partnered with IBM to offer a new model whereby “IBM … will provide the data-storage facilities and services, and AT&T will … offer the global network that clients will use to retrieve the data,” according to the Bloomberg write up. It is the closest relationship IBM has ever had with a phone carrier.

Undoubtedly, this new model will be tapped for healthcare purposes, but it’s still speculation as to just how it will be adopted for secure exchange of patient health information. I sent out a few feelers via my social networks to see if anyone related to either IBM or AT&T could provide more detail, and got back this statement from an IBM representative: “I would assume that there will be a HIPAA compliant component. It goes without saying that the healthcare industry is a HUGE segment for IBM.”

“Huge” just might be an understatement, as IBM has stated it wants to attain $7 billion in cloud revenue by 2015. In today’s terms, that’s just one vendor making up the current market value for cloud services.

I’ll be interested to see how this plays out, especially as previously lower profile (at least in the healthcare space) technology companies like Dell and IBM, and companies like AT&T and Verizon that are more widely known in the consumer market, continue to make healthcare IT headlines.

An EMR Point of Differentiation – Watson

Posted on May 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Michael Dale has an interesting post I came across discussing IBM’s Watson in healthcare. Here’s one piece of the post:

You may know Watson best for its performance on the Jeopardy game show. Watson demonstrated swift decision making after indexing over 200 million pages of data. Watson would only answer if the system crossed a certain confidence threshold. The confidence threshold was a predefined percentage set inside the system. When Watson referenced the data, it determined the percentage to which it was sure the top three answers were correct. If the percentage of the top answer crossed the confidence threshold, Watson would signal for the answer. The IBM machine proved itself successful against two humans competing in the game show by winning both rounds.

Certainly physicians and members have much to gain from the assistance of a machine that can reference millions of pages of data to ascertain a diagnosis or treatment. While physicians may always hold the upper hand to interpret the context of the situation for a presenting patient, Watson’s assistance can certainly supplement any decision using vast amounts of data in a quicker time frame.

My immediate reaction to reading this post was the following:

Reading what you wrote made me wonder if the Watson like technology could become a strong differentiation between EHR vendors. It has been extremely challenging lately to differentiate between the various EHR vendor offerings. It seems like having a Watson like brain assisting you in the process could become a differentiation point.

So many physicians are trying to sift through the overwhelming number of EHR companies, that they are looking and wanting for some sort of major EHR differentiation. I wonder if some smart Watson like technology would be amazing enough to blow physicians away so they start saying, I have to have that.

Michael Dale also discusses in the post how Watson would essentially use an EHR to access the data. Sounds a lot like my comments about EHR Being the Database of Healthcare.

Happy 50th Birthday To Our Friend The EMR

Posted on February 27, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

If someone asked you how long it’s been since someone lit up an EMR, what would your guess be?  Five years?  Ten? Even 20? What if I suggested that the first EMR was installed 50 years ago in an Akron hospital?

According to IBM, the first EMR was rolled out at Akron’s Childrens Hospital in February 1962.  In Big Blue’s own words:

Though Dr. Lawrence L. Weed is credited for developing the first electronic medical record, the so-called Problem-Oriented Medical Information System (Promis), starting in 1969. But IBM, working with Akron’s Children’s Hospital, implemented a system years earlier that would be the grand-daddy of today’s EMR.

Other early players in EMR evolution included doctors at the University of Vermont, whose PROMIS system and later the POMR (problem-oriented medical record) followed in the late 1960s, as well as the Mayo Clinic. Still, it seems we may have IBM and a pioneering children’s hospital to thank for much of what we discuss so passionately here today.

By the way, it’s interesting to note that while the technology has evolved in astounding ways, the EMR as a concept hasn’t changed nearly as much.  For example, even back then execs were noting that nurses were spending far more time handling paper than they needed to (and that one patient could generate 50 forms, a number which I’d bet still hasn’t changed). It’s amazing that a problem we defined 50 years ago still defies easy solutions, but there you have it.

Meanwhile, courtesy of Scribd, check out the actual IBM press release  on the subject (typed on an oldie-but-goodie typewriter):