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Improving Diagnosis in Healthcare

Posted on September 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Rasu Shrestha, MD, MBA has been really sharing amazing information lately on Twitter. If you don’t follow him, you should do so now. Today, he shared this great image (below) together with a link to what he called a landmark paper from IOM called “Improving Diagnosis in Health Care“.
Improving Diagnosis in Health Care
*Click on the image to see it in full size

The paper also had this great video with it which tells some of the stories behind the paper:

FDA, EHREvent, NIST: Who’s up for an EMR Supercop gig?

Posted on November 15, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now enjoys writing about healthcare, science and technology.

Last week I wrote wondering who will police EMRs and EHRs. With the release of IOM’s report recommending the creation of a different federal agency to serve as EMR watchdog, this topic has been generating buzz in healthcare circles. I’m by no means an expert in healthcare IT or policy matters but the discussion surrounding this topic has helped me think things through better than last week. Commenter Don Fluckinger answered the blog post with the first comment on the post – saying “these guys” and pointing to Commenter Carl Bergman said the FDA, which is already tasked with gathering adverse events for medical devices, might be the ideal go-to-agency for software adverse events as well. It is my understanding that medical software would receive Category 3 classification, if FDA were to provide the oversight.

IOM’s approach has been to suggest the creation of a non-regulatory, NTSB-like body. IOM’s rationale for undercutting FDA’s role has been that FDA classification system might stifle health IT innovation. (I’ve only had the time to read the very first few pages summarizing the rest of the IOM report, so I’m not sure if/how they address these concerns later.)

Here’s what I don’t get: What’s the point of creating yet another powerless body to issue guidelines? If there’s already a body with regulatory and oversight powers that covers your domain, has a large database of medical device related adverse events, why can its capabilities not be extended further to medical software as well? Further, why are health IT vendors exempt from any slaps on the wrist?

No offense to anyone, but from what I’m reading about, I don’t see much to recommend them: John says they “are not going to have high enough profile to be able to really collect the reports… a reporting system is great, but if no one knows to report something there, then it’s not worth much. Plus, if someone reports something but the organization doesn’t do anything with that information, it’s not very meaningful”. Valid question but I think there could be some easy workarounds for the problem of not knowing how/where to report shouldn’t be a major issue. Healthcare IT just needs the software equivalents of those “How’s my driving?” flaps adorning the backs of 18-wheelers. The bigger question is what happens when the EMR system fails? Who pays? How much? How does the vendor ensure the failure doesn’t happen again? Do we learn from the cumulative mistakes of the industry? Time will tell.