Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Healthcare IT Vendor Blogs

Posted on December 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After 10 years and 9404 blog posts later, I’ve come to know a little something about blogs. You might also say that I’m totally bias about the power of a well written blog. The reality is that blogging is just a simple way for anyone to publish content online. Blogging has really opened up the opportunity to publish great content to everyone.

With that said, it’s not easy sustaining a blog with great content. The tyranny of time is real and however far ahead you get on your blog, time will eat that away before you can blink your eye. It takes a real commitment to keep a blog up to date with regular content.

To honor some of these efforts, I thought it would be fun to share some of my favorite healthcare IT vendor blogs. It’s great to acknowledge the effort these vendors put into creating great content. Sure, they likely want to get more exposure for their companies. That’s a given, but that doesn’t diminish that many healthcare IT vendors are creating amazing free content on a regular basis on their blogs. Here’s a quick look at a few that I enjoy.

Information Advantage Blog by Iron Mountain – This blog focuses deeply on the challenge of health information management and topics such as: health information governance, medical records scanning, health data storage, etc. Those in the AHIMA and HIM community will really enjoy the blog, but there’s a little something for anyone interested in healthcare IT.

HL7 Standards by Corepoint Health – Most of you are likely familiar with this blog since it’s the home of the #HITsm Twitter chat. They post the host and topics for each week’s #HITsm chat, but they do much more. The HL7 Standards blog has a wide variety of amazing healthcare IT content from a diverse group of guest bloggers. They rarely put up a post that’s not worth a read.

Kareo Blog by Kareo – The Kareo blog is home to Kareo product updates and the #KareoChat, but they also regularly post some great content. Kareo has long been the advocate for the independent small practice physician. Therefore, you can imagine that their content is all focused around that audience.

CloudView Blog by athenahealth – This blog is a reflection of the athenahealth CEO, Jonathan Bush. You never know what to expect. No doubt Jonathan Bush has created a culture at athenahealth that’s trying to push boundaries and we often see that reflected on the athenahealth blog. In fact, the best posts on the athenahealth blog come from Jonathan Bush himself. I also love that the CEO of the company is present on the blog. Some might argue that it’s not really Jonathan writing the post, but when you read his posts it’s all Jonathan coming through in the message.

There are many more great healthcare vendor blogs out there. If you have some favorites or ones I should check out, please share them in the comments. If we get enough recommendations we’ll do a follow up post featuring other healthcare IT vendor blogs.

Enjoy the light reading this holiday weekend!

Full Disclosure: I’ve written a few posts over the years for the Kareo and Iron Mountain blogs.

Are Patients Becoming Price and Quality Sensitive?

Posted on October 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I was watching the live stream of Jonathan Bush, CEO of athenahealth speaking and then on a panel at US News’ Hospital of Tomorrow event. Jonathan Bush was as good as ever and offered some really amazing insights into the changing culture of health care as we know it. He also introduced the LetDoctorsBeDoctors.com website along with the ZDoggMD Jay Z parody video called EHR State of Mind.

At one point in the panel discussion he made a point that really stuck with me. He suggested that a few years ago you could cut the price of your services in half and you’d still get the same number of patients in your office. Then he said that you could double the price of your services and you’d still get the same number of patients. He went on to say that you could provide better care to your patients and you’d still get the same number of patients.

Certainly that’s not a direct quote, but you get the gist of what he’s saying. Essentially, a few years back patients weren’t price or quality of care sensitive. Sure, maybe on a really macro scale some really doctors would be found out, but for the most part patients didn’t care what the price of healthcare was since they just paid the co-pay and they had no way of knowing the quality of care the doctor provided.

Jonathan suggested that over the past couple years this has started to change. Patients were becoming more price and quality of care sensitive. He didn’t explain why this is the case, but I’d suggest that it’s due to more availability of information and high deductible plans.

I think this shift in how patients select their healthcare is going to have wide ranging impacts on the health care system. Michael Robinson, Vice President, U.S. Health and Life Sciences, Microsoft, was on the panel with Jonathan Bush and suggested that technology was the enabler for a lot of these changes. That’s not true for all of the changes, but no doubt it plays a role in a lot of them.

The athenahealth EHR and Meaningful Use Guarantees

Posted on April 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve written many times about the various meaningful use guarantees that many companies have made over the years. athenahealth being one of the first to do so. In fact, they’ve made it part of their company culture to make guarantees. They’ve done it with Meaningful Use, ICD-10, EOBs, PQRS and MSSP guarantees. Jonathan Bush, President and CEO of athenahealth, recently did a blog post that explained why they do these guarantees:

When Leon Leonwood Bean, founder of L.L.Bean, first created the infamous Bean Boot (officially known as the Maine Hunting Shoe), he sent mailers out to local fishermen and hunters to promote the new boot and guarantee complete satisfaction. Within a few weeks, 90 of the first 100 boots purchased were returned. The leather uppers had separated from the rubber bottoms. Though it almost put L.L.Bean out of business, L. L. stayed true to the guarantee and refunded the customers. After borrowing more money to perfect the boot, he put them back on the market. This winter, over 100 years later, L.L.Bean couldn’t even keep up with the demand for Bean Boots. They’ve even become the latest badge of hipsterdom.

Today, L.L.Bean continues to guarantee satisfaction on all its products. Customers are always trying to return 10 year old boots for brand new ones. But the company doesn’t get persnickety about it. The amount of business the guarantee drives (as evident by this year’s demand) more than makes up for the cost of some free boots, which may never have become a practical winter fashion statement without putting money on the line.

Jonathan Bush goes on to talk about how many people think that the guarantee is about marketing, but it’s not. It’s about a corporate mandate that inspires innovation around something that’s important to customers. You can see how this works. If your bottom line is affected by a guarantee, then you’re sure as heck going to work like crazy to figure out how to solve that problem. At least you better, or your going to go out of business.

Pretty smart thinking as long as you’re smart about which things are worth guaranteeing. The wrong guarantee and you could have your company spending time innovating on something that doesn’t matter. Of course, at least you also get the benefit of the guarantee marketing bump whether Jonthan wants to admit it or not.

Connected Health takes the stage at Partners symposium

Posted on October 28, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The Connected Health Symposium is not one of the larger health conferences, but it is one of the most respected. I met a number of leaders in health IT there who praised it for the conference scope and seriousness, and told me they were glad to see me there covering it.

Many issues in health IT and patient empowerment, however, are best learned not from any conference, but from the tussles and tears of everyday life. Let us hope no reader has undergone the personal experience of having her reports dismissed and of being misdiagnosed, as did several speakers at the conference.

But many of us have spent three hours on the phone with an insurer to approve a single medication shipment, or fought in vain to get the medical records that US law requires providers to give us, or watched our doctor fumble with his new EHR for fifteen minutes while trying to stay engaged with us.

It’s encouraging to see the progress of patient engagement at Massachusetts General Hospital, as reported by Gregg Meyer of Partners Healthcare System (the funder behind the Center for Connected Health that put on the symposium). But can small and rural providers struggling with cash flow join the movement?

These institutions would be comfortable using swyMe, a HIPAA-compliant telemedicine system that allows doctors to interview patients over everyday mobile devices and perhaps avoid a trip to the hospital. swyMe can also transmit audio and video from devices that EMTs can connect up to the phone. (Not many devices with the necessary hardware connectors are on the market, though.)

swyMe was one of the “innovators” highlighted in a conference demo. Jeffrey Urdan, COO of the company that makes it, told me later that he felt “low tech” compared to some of the fancy, expensive devices at the demo. But most of the providers in the US, and elsewhere, are more on swyMe’s level than theirs.

Another hurdle to forming connected teams that serve the patient is interoperability. A sign of the distance we have yet to come can be found in iCancerHealth, a service for cancer patients offered by Medocity. A free app is available to individuals, but the main integrated service is offered through providers or pharma companies doing clinical trials. The service includes such conveniences as medication tracking, treatment plans, a diary, audio and video connections to their physician, and even a way to form communities with other patients.

This is great, but iCancerHealth works with data from only one provider. This can be a limitation even for the few months that cancer patients typically use the service, and could certainly be a problem if the service were expanded to a broader range of illnesses. Similarly, there’s no seamless way to share data with patient communities; it has to be re-entered manually. Enhancing the service to encompass multiple providers would probably require wider adoption of electronic health record standards.

As an example of finding a creative solution to devices that lack interoperability, Mobile Diagnostic Services demonstrated an app that could photograph the display panel of a device, interpret the bars on the display to create digital data, and transmit the values to a health record in the cloud. This is a process well-known to computer programmers from thirty years ago as “screen scraping,” now relevant to the health industry.

One of the strengths of the Connected Health Symposium was the platform it gave to patients and doctors to express their frustrations with the old way of delivering care and the slow pace of change. The testimony could come from entrepreneur Robin Farmanfarmaian, who lost three organs unnecessarily to misdiagnosis, or Sarah Krüg, president of the Society for Participatory Medicine, whose parents died from diseases that might have been caught if the doctors had paid attention to their reported symptoms.

Or the testimony could come from Greg LaGana and Barry Levy, MDs who write and perform in a musical review called Damaged Care that skewers everything about doctors behavior as well as the legal and financial environment in which they have to operate.

Anna MCollister-Slipp, co-founder of Galileo Analytics and a sufferer from type 1 diabetes, regaled us with the dozens of vital sign measurements, treatments, and other details she has to manage on her own manually. She still get lab reports only because her doctor sends them via email (using a private account, so that HIPAA zealots don’t discipline him–the rights and wishes of the patient are supposed to be paramount). Like other conference attendees, though, she reported progress in tools and patient-oriented culture.

Less was heard at the symposium from other sectors of the medical field, but we did hear from Michael of Aetna, Jonathan Bush of athenahealth, and Beverley Bryant of England’s National Health Service. The panel on which Bryant spoke proved to be discouraging. Many of us in the US like to think that other developed nations with their universal health care systems have solved the coordination and interoperability messes that the US is in. But the panelists expressed many familiar frustrations.

I plan to return to the Connected Health Symposium next year, and I’m sure each year will bring a bit of progress toward better communication among staff, better use of patient data, and better integration of tools. The mood at the show was largely positive. But a little probing turned up barriers in the way of the healthcare system we all want.

Jonathan Bush Loves Health Data–But How Will We Get As Much As He Wants?

Posted on September 24, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The fervent hope of health care reformers is that someday we will each know as much about our bodies–our vital signs, the health of our organs, the contents of our genomes-as corporations know about our marketing habits. One of the recent expressions of this dream comes in Jonathan Bush’s engaging and readable account of the healthcare system, Where Does It Hurt?.

Bush is a tireless advocate for bottom-up, disruptive forces in healthcare, somewhat in the same camp as Vinod Khosla (whose Health Datapalooza keynote I covered) and Clayton Christensen (who wrote the forward to Bush’s book). What Bush brings to the discussion is hands-on experience at confronting the healthcare behemoth in an explicitly disruptive way (which failed) as well as fitting into the system while providing a bit more light by building athenahealth (which succeeded).

Bush’s book tours the wreckage of the conventional health care system–the waste, errors, lack of communication, and neglect of chronic conditions that readers of this blog know about–as well as some of the promising companies or non-profits that offer a way forward. His own prescription for the health care system rests on two main themes: the removal of regulations that prevent the emergence of a true market, and the use of massive data collection (on physicians and patients alike) to drive a rational approach to health care.

Both government and insurers would have a much smaller role in Bush’s ideal health care system. He recognizes that catastrophic conditions should be covered for all members of society, and that the industry will need (as all industries do) a certain minimum of regulation. (Bush even admitted that he “whined” to the ONC about the refusal of a competitor to allow data exchange.) But he wants government and insurers to leave a wide open field for the wild, new ideas of clinicians, entrepreneurs, and software developers.

Besides good old-fashioned human ingenuity, the active ingredient in this mix is data–good data (not what we have now), and lots of it. Bush’s own first healthcare business failed, as he explains, through lack of data along with the inconsistency of insurance payments. A concern for data runs through this book, and motivates his own entrance into the electronic health records market.

What’s missing from the Where Does It Hurt?, I think, is the importance of getting things in the right order: we can’t have engaged patients making free choices until an enormous infrastructure of data falls into place. I have looked at the dependencies between different aspects of health IT in my report, The Information Technology Fix for Health: Barriers and Pathways to the Use of Information Technology for Better Health Care. Let’s look at some details.

Bush wants patients to have choice–but there’s already a lot of choice in where they get surgery or other procedures performed. As he points out, some of the recent regulations (such as accountable care organizations) and trends in consolidations go in the wrong direction, removing much of this choice. (I have also written recently about limited networks.) One of Bush’s interesting suggestions is that hospitals learn to specialize and pay to fly patients long distances for procedures, a massive extension of the “medical tourism” affluent people sometimes engage in.

But even if we have full choice, we won’t be able to decide where to go unless quality measures are rigorously collected, analyzed, and published. Funny thing–quality measures are some of the major requirements for Meaningful Use, and the very things that health IT people complain about. What I hear over and over is that the ONC should have focused laser-like on interoperability and forgone supposedly minor quests like collecting quality measurements.

Well, turns out we’ll need these quality measures if we want a free market in health care. Can the industry collect these measures without being strong-armed by government? I don’t see how.

If I want a space heater, I can look in the latest Consumer Reports and see two dozen options rated for room heating, spot heating, fire safety, and many other characteristics. But comparable statistics aren’t so easy to generate in health care. Seeing what a mess the industry has made of basic reporting and data sharing in the data that matters most–patient encounters–we can’t wait for providers to give us decent quality measures.

There’s a lot more data we need besides provider data. Bush goes into some detail about the Khosla-like vision of patients collecting and sharing huge amounts of information in the search for new cures. Sites such as PatientsLikeMe suggest a disruptive movement that bypasses the conventional health care system, but most people are not going to bother collecting the data until they can use it in clinical settings.

And here we have the typical vicious cycle of inertia in health care: patients don’t collect data because their doctors won’t use it, doctors say they can’t even accept the data because their EHRs don’t have a place for it, and EHR vendors don’t make a place for it because there’s no demand. Stage 3 of Meaningful Use tries to mandate the inclusion of patient data in records, but the tremendous backward tug of industry resistance saps hope from the implementation of this stage.

So I like Bush’s vision, but have to ask: how will we get there? athenahealth seems to be doing its part to help. New developments such as Apple’s HealthKit may help as well. Perhaps Where Does It Hurt? can help forward-thinking vendors, doctors, health information exchanges, entrepreneurs, and ordinary people pull together into a movement to make a functioning system out of the pieces lying around the landscape.

Health Datapalooza 2014 Recap

Posted on June 9, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

The Health Datapalooza conference is ripe with opportunities to inspire and be inspired.  At any given session or lunch, the developer of an emerging app is seated at your left, and the winner of some other developer challenge a few years ago is on your right.  The vibe is a bit frenetic, in a good way.

At this conference, data geeks get right down to the business of discussing controversial and innovative healthcare data issues.  Nothing is watered down.  Even the Director of NIH Francis Collins, whom everyone wanted to hear play his guitar and sing, charged right in with data-rich graphs and statistics.  Jeremy Hunt of the UK offered sobering yet transparent error figures, encouraging the use of data to learn from and improve upon our safety practices at the point of care.  Keynotes from Jonathan Bush and Todd Park alleviated any need for caffeine, even though there was plenty on hand.  Countless application developers told truly compelling stories of their solutions.  Kathleen Sebelius challenged us to reconsider “the way we’ve always done it”.

What’s not to love?

I had hoped we would dive deeper into interoperability issues such as consistent data transport and payload standards.  Or, how a sensitive dependence on initial conditions such as protocol specifications, as in chaos theory, can lead to unexpected behaviors in pairwise HISP (Direct Exchange service provider) interoperability, seemingly at random.  Our data needs to be free to move about the care continuum, in order to be the most useful to us.  Gamification was suggested as a way to help patients adhere to medications.  Perhaps it could also encourage Healthcare IT companies to better adhere to specifications?

Silo was another buzzword that was used a lot last week.  That is to say, it’s a buzzword you don’t want to be associated with.  It was reassuring that we’ve set expectations properly around interoperability.  Fortunately, silos are going the way of the beeper and the booth babe.

There were some well-received promises of intense BlueButton promotion in the fall by Dr. Oz and several others.  I was also really encouraged to see the BlueButton Toolkit site preview on Sunday.  Look for more information about this when it goes live, and be sure to send Adam Dole your suggestions.  Great work, Adam!

Maybe next year at Health Datapalooza, we’ll talk about structuring the data collected by wearable devices, since we certainly heard this year about how integral to wellness quantified self is expected to be.  Quantified self and interoperability might even be considered as separate award categories in the Code-A-Palooza contest next year.  This could lead to more diversity and creativity in developers’ solutions, while helping to spur patient engagement and data transfer.

Countless examples of knowledge gleaned from large datasets, that could be used to make better medical decisions, were cited.  But this information hasn’t yet been integrated into day to day clinical workflow in a way that’s helpful to individual patients.  There’s no single source of individualized, analytics-enabled tools for patients to guide medical decision-making today.  But there will be!

KLAS Gives athenahealth, Not Epic, its 2013 “Best in KLAS” award

Posted on February 6, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While Epic Systems may still be that the giant in the room, according KLAS, athenahealth is the best overall software vendor for 2013.

athenahealth’s taking first place pushes Epic to second for the first time in eight years. athenahealth got the most positive opinions from the thousands of providers participating in the KLAS poll, notably praise for the usability of its athenaClinicals, athenaCollector and athenaCommunicator products, according to EHR Intelligence.

athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush was all too happy to take a victory lap. “The old guard of each IT leaders is finally being displaced by more nimble innovative models designed for healthcare’s future – not for its past,” Bush told EHR Intelligence.

Epic still remains in first place as for its overall software suite, reports EHR Intelligence. And it took home multiple prizes this year. But there’s a revolution brewing outside the Epic palace, it would appear. Not one that calls for angry peasants and pitchforks, but clearly some level of entrenched discontent is at work here.

Other well-known vendors of EMRs took their lumps as well. For example, Cerner came in at seventeenth, McKesson at 20th, and Allscripts came in 23rd.

So what to make of all of this? As my colleague John Lynn notes, awards of this kind are best taken with a grain of salt. After all, providers don’t need software that wins popularity contests, they need software which they can afford, which can handily meet Meaningful Use standards and which doctors and nurses and other clinicians can use without a hitch. Being sure their vendors win sexy awards really isn’t on their worry list.

Still, the fact that Epic has been unseated after eight years at the top of KLAS’s best vendor list may mean something. Perhaps Epic’s grip on the market is loosening a bit?

Big Healthcare Companies Won’t Disrupt Themselves

Posted on November 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been really interested in something Jay Walker, curator and chairman of TEDMED, told me at Xerox Healthcare event at CHIME. I’m not exactly sure how we got into the conversation, but Jay made the comment that “big companies never disrupt themselves.”

I’d love to have had a chance to dive in more to what Jay Walker was really thinking on this subject. No doubt I could tell he’d given it a lot of thought. However, the concept is incredibly intriguing to me and the more I dig into it I realize that Jay is really on to something.

There are so many reasons why a big organization won’t or can’t disrupt itself. This isn’t to say that big companies aren’t without their value. It turns out that large organizations are really really good at optimizing existing business, services and processes. They can squeeze the value out of a current business like no other. However, optimizing your current business is very different than disrupting your business and changing a market. There are just too many incentives for a large healthcare organization to not disrupt themselves.

When it comes to healthcare IT, I think we will see this same concept play out as well. We can look to the large healthcare IT organizations to see how something is going to be optimized, but we shouldn’t expect any sort of disruptive innovation to come from these larger healthcare IT companies. They have so many reasons not to disrupt themselves.

I give Jonathan Bush, CEO of athenahealth, a lot of credit when it comes to understanding this. He literally built a program at athenahealth that he calls “More Disruption Please.” My take on it is that Jonathan Bush wanted a way to spend a bunch of money on things that could disrupt the athenahealth business. This program would allow him to do just that without having to explain that spend to the public markets. When they ask why he spend millions of dollars on these disruptive companies, he can just say “That’s what I told you I was going to do. It’s called More Disruption Please for a reason!” I think it’s pure genius.

Although, even this effort which I call genius really just highlights that the disruption to healthcare is likely going to come from outside large companies. If anything, this program is a way for athenahealth to tap into that disruption so that they’re well positioned to ride that wave of disruption which will surely come.

What disruptions do you see coming to healthcare? And if you tell me it’s coming from a big company, I’ll take a look, but now you’ll know I’m skeptical. Although, I’m certainly happy to be proven wrong.

Health 2.0 Boston

Posted on May 15, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m in Boston enjoying meeting with a lot of really smart people at Health 2.0. As usual, the biggest value of the conference is the people you meet and the hallway conversations you have with those people. I’ll certainly be doing posts over the next couple weeks related to those conversations.

The other highlight of Health 2.0 was hearing Jonathan Bush speak. He was in true Jonathan Bush form and he’s great because you can guarantee that he’ll never give the same speech twice. As one person said in the hallway, the connection between him thinking it and him saying it is very short. It’s so short that it has no filter. My biggest complaint with Jonathan Bush’s talk was that they only gave him 20 minutes on stage. Not nearly enough.

For those who couldn’t make it, here’s the main points that Jonathan Bush provided:
1. “Don’t bite off more than you can chew.”
2. “You need your partner’s ‘id’ as well as their signature.”
3. “Culture trumps capability.”

This is all really good advice for healthcare startup companies. One other thought from Jonathan Bush:

Here are some other good takeaways from Health 2.0 Boston that were tweeted out:


Very good advice and appropriate at Health 2.0 Boston since the focus of it is about partnerships.


There’s a compelling story if you look at how much uncompensated care physicians provide.