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The State of “Direct Project” in Healthcare

Posted on December 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Update: Here is the recorded version of this Direct Project panel:

and here’s the video of the Q&A with the audience that followed:

As part of our ongoing series of Healthcare Scene interviews (see all our past Healthcare Scene interviews on YouTube), we’re excited to announce our next interview with an amazing panel of Direct Project experts, Julie Maas, Greg Meyer, and Mark Hefner happening Wednesday, December 9th at 3 PM ET (Noon PT).

As you can imagine, we’ll be digging into everything Direct Project (See CMS’ description of Direct Project for those not famliar with it). I’m excited to learn about ways Direct Project is starting to impact healthcare, but also to learn about the challenges it still faces and how they can be overcome. We’ll probably even dip into where Direct Project fits in with other projects like FHIR and EHR APIs getting all the attention.


Here are a few more details about our panelists:

You can watch our interview on Blab or in the embed below. We’ll be interviewing our panelists for the first 30-40 minutes of the blab and then we’ll open up to the audience for questions for the rest of the hour. We hope you can join us live. We’ll also share the recorded video after the event.

How Trust Communities Enable Direct Networks

Posted on June 13, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

Have you noticed the DTAAP-Accredited logos on your Direct provider’s web site?  These indicate the vendor has successfully completed the related audits stipulating a high bar of security and privacy practices established by DirectTrust.  DirectTrust was spawned from a Direct Project workgroup, and is a non-profit trade organization which establishes best practices and oversees accreditation programs for the businesses providing Direct-related services, in association with EHNAC.  In addition to HISPs, the DTAAP program also accredits Certification Authorities (CAs) and Registration Authorities (RAs). The HISP, CA and RA roles can be performed by the same organization. Most Direct Messaging CAs operate in only in the Direct space, but a few also issue certificates in the general public internet space, as well.

Direct Certificates are issued by CAs who follow a regular procedure to put their stamp of approval on a digital identity and its corresponding cryptographic key used for securing Direct messages.  This process is complemented by that of a Registration Authority, who performs the actual vetting of individuals and often the archival of related documentation as well.  Level of Assurance (LoA) is another term used a lot in the Direct space. Depending on the degree to which an individual’s identity has been vetted, and how certificates are managed and accessed by users, a Direct Exchange transaction can be assigned a Level of Assurance. When exchanging health information between providers, for example, you want a high Level of Assurance that the party you’re exchanging with is, in fact, the same party whose name is listed on the corresponding digital certificate.

HISPs who are either accredited or are at least part-way down that path may seek inclusion of the corresponding CA’s trust anchor in DirectTrust’s anchor bundle, a collection of trust anchors for Direct communication published and regularly updated by DirectTrust.  Since Direct messaging is based on bidirectional trust, the Participating HISPs can rely on the Transitional Trust Bundle to provide their customers with a uniform and up-to-date network of interconnected senders and receivers. The DirectTrust bundle consists of trust anchors representing a large portion of the EHR community.

These HISPs make up the DirectTrust Network, a so-called “trust community”. There are other trust communities such as those managed by the Automate the BlueButton Initiative (ABBI), with corresponding Provider- and Patient-centered bundles.  Trust communities and their corresponding trust bundles serve an important purpose, because Direct messages are only exchanged successfully between trusted Direct Exchange partners. Remember that if one party does not trust the other, the messages are dropped silently, and automating loading and maintenance of trust anchors for a community using a trust bundle sure beats manual loading and unloading of each of these anchors by each of the members, or other old-style one-off interfaces between systems.

So, to get the most out of Direct, climb out of your silo and go join a trust community today!

 

Direct Messaging: The Logistics of Exchange

Posted on June 12, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

Once you enable digital health data exchange via Direct instead of by fax, you’ll want to share your address with other providers, so you no longer have to deal with all those pesky scanned attachments, subtly linked to electronic patient records.

Direct directories are enabling address lookup to meet this need, and you can also let your most common business partners know your address by including it on document templates you already exchange today, so they can begin to exchange with you via Direct when they’re ready.  You can also contact your referring docs using another method you trust (such as the fax where you usually send them medical records, or their business phone number) to ask for their Direct address.

It’s wise to confirm expectations with exchange partners about the use cases/data payloads for which you intend to exchange via Direct, as Direct isn’t used just like email by everyone.  Some will use Direct solely for Transitions of Care and patient Transmit, others may use it for Secure Messaging with patients, and still other providers will be happy to conduct general professional correspondence with patients and other providers over Direct.  This service information may or may not be reflected in the first provider directories.  And even within the Transitions of Care use case, if standards aren’t implemented for optimal receiving, a sending system may generate a CCDA (Continuity of Care Document) with a subtly different structure than a receiving system is able to completely digest.  So, just a heads up as you receive your first message or two from a system with whom you haven’t exchanged before: you’ll want to carefully monitor what data is incorporated by the receiving system and what is not, and you may need to iterate slightly between sender and receiver to get the data consumption right.  You’ll still be miles ahead of the custom interfaces model.

All in all, Direct is easy to use and is working much better than the naysayers would have you believe.  Direct software follows the specification outlined in the document lovingly known in the industry as the “Applicability Statement”, crafted by consensus through a public/private collaborative effort known as the “Direct Project” and led by the Office of the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology (ONC).   Direct Project volunteers have also written reference implementations following this specification which have been used by many HISPs and EHRs as the basis for their own Direct offerings.  Other private entities have developed their own APIs and implementations of the protocol from scratch.  These different systems and varying configurations regularly test and collaborate with each other, to make Direct work as seamlessly as possible for the end users.  Because the whole system only works as well as our joint efforts, HISPs (Health Information Service Providers who provide Direct services) within the DirectTrust Network take interoperability seriously and work together to iron out any kinks.

A tremendous amount of collaboration is taking place to bring interoperability to fruition for Direct’s well-established standards and policies, and this work is producing a larger and more robust network each day.

Next Week’s Guest Blogger – Julie Maas from EMR Direct

Posted on June 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Next week, it’s going to be a little different around here. Next week, I’m going to be spending the week at Zions National Park as part of a family reunion. We did this a couple years back and unless things have changed, I’ll be stuck completely off the grid with no wifi or even cell coverage (Although, I may slip into town one day to check my email). Should be quite the experience.

I’ve actually done this a few times before and you probably didn’t know it. I just schedule the posts to appear and no one even realized I was gone. In fact, when I’ve done it in the past, I’ve had some of my highest traffic days on the blog. Don’t ask me how that works.

Next week, I decided to do something a little bit different. When I first started blogging, I remember a blogger “turning over the keys” to his blog to another blogger for the week. I always thought that was a kind of cool idea. Usually the person who “drives” the blog for the week enjoys it, the readers get another perspective, and the blog keeps humming while I’m wrestling 4 children and 12 cousins in the wilderness.

While I’m away, I’m handing the keys over to my favorite HIMSS 2014 discovery, Julie Maas. Before HIMSS this year, I’d certainly interacted with Julie a number of times on Twitter, but I’d never really gotten to know her and what she did. Needless to say, once I met her in person and heard her story I was utterly impressed with her and what she’s doing in healthcare IT. Side Lesson: Don’t judge a person solely by their Twitter account or Twitter interactions. There’s usually a lot more to them.

As I consider who I trusted with the keys to this blog, I wondered if Julie would be willing to share her knowledge, expertise and perspective. For those who don’t know Julie (shame on you), she’s been living, eating, breathing and sleeping the Direct Project for the company she started EMR Direct.

I’ve heard really promising things about Direct Project, but have never dug into it like I should have done. So, I’m as excited to read Julie’s series of posts next week as any of you. She’s also going to throw in a little Health Datapalooza commentary as well. I’ll be interested to hear what you think of Direct Project after reading Julie’s posts.

I hope you’ll give Julie a warm welcome to the blog next week. If you like this idea, maybe we’ll do it again. If you hate it or Direct Project, then we’ll be back with our usual snark the week after.

Now, what’s the ICD-10 code for internet withdrawal?