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Health IT End of Year Loose Ends

Posted on December 13, 2016 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn’t rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

In that random scrap heap I refer to as my memory, I’ve compiled several items not worthy of a full post, but that keep nagging me for a mention. Here are the ones that’ve surfaced:

Patient Matching. Ideally, your doc should be able to pull your records from another system like pulling cash from an ATM. The hang up is doing patient matching, which is record sharing’s last mile problem. Patients don’t have a unique identifier, which means to make sure your records are really yours your doctor’s practice has to use several cumbersome workarounds.

The 21st Century Cures Act calls for GAO to study ONC’s approach to patient matching and determine if there’s a need for a standard set of data elements, etc. With luck, GAO will cut to the chase and address the need for a national patient ID.

fEMR. In 2014, I noted Team fEMR, which developed an open source EHR for medical teams working on short term – often crises — projects. I’m pleased to report the project and its leaders Sarah Diane Draugelis and Kevin Zurek are going strong and recently got a grant from the Pollination Project. Bravo.

What’s What. I live in DC, read the Washington Post daily etc., but if I want to know what’s up with HIT in Congress, etc., my first source is Politico’s Morning EHealth. Recommended.

Practice Fusion. Five years ago, I wrote a post that was my note to PF about why I couldn’t be one of their consultants anymore. Since then the post has garnered almost 30,000 hits and just keeps going. As pleased as I am at its longevity, I think it’s only fair to say that it’s pretty long in the tooth, so read it with that in mind.

Ancestry Health. A year ago September, I wrote about Ancestry.com’s beta site Ancestry Health. It lets families document your parents, grandparents, etc., and your medical histories, which can be quite helpful. It also promised to use your family’s depersonalized data for medical research. As an example, I set up King Agamemnon family’s tree. The site is still in beta, which I assume means it’s not going anywhere. Too bad. It’s a thoughtful and useful idea. I also do enjoy getting their occasional “Dear Agamemnon” emails.

Jibo. I’d love to see an AI personal assistant for PCPs, etc., to bring up related information during exams, capture new data, make appointments and prepare scripts. One AI solution that looked promising was Jibo. The bad news is that it keeps missing its beta ship date. However, investors are closing in on $100 million. Stay tuned.

 

fEMR Targets Pop Up Clinics’ Needs

Posted on April 29, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn’t rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Detroit’s Wayne State University students are pioneering fEMR, a special EMR for pop up clinics. These are transient clinics operating in under served areas with mass medical emergencies.

Beginning after Haiti’s devastating, 2010 earthquake, WSU’s undergraduate, medical students and doctors started staffing several pop ups. Operating with little or no electricity or other basic supports, these clinics often provide residents their only medical services.

Two volunteers, med student Erik Brown, and premed grad Sarah Draugelis, realized the need to create a basic medical record to aid their work and to print out for the patients. They looked at current EHRs, but they were far too complex, as Draugelis told Improvewsu.org,

We needed something that was fitted for high volume short-term clinics,” Draugelis explained. “We don’t have time to scroll and look at all the tabs in the EMR system. We need something very bare bones, very, very basic.” So, they looked into the EMR systems that already existed, but none of them fit the bill.

Last month, Brown and Draugelis told fEMR’s dramatic story on Live in the D TV show,

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

For help, the two turned to WSU Computer Science professor, Dr. Andrian Marcus, who recruited senior, Kevin Zurek, as technical lead.

fEMR is the result. Built using Play, a fast, light platform for web and mobile apps, fEMR incorporates a simple workflow of three steps: Triage, Medical and Pharmacy. Running on iPads, its tap and touch interface is designed for speed.

fEmr Triage Screen

fEmr Triage Screen

I contacted Zurek who gave me a login to their test site running on Chrome. It is, indeed, bare bones and fast. I created a patient, shown in the web shot above, and played with the package. Though a work in progress, it had no surprises, that is, no crashes, mysterious behavior, etc.

I asked Zurek what he sees as fEMR’s future? Are they going to take it commercial, etc.? He told me,

Our target audience generally consists of volunteers, so we have no concrete plans to commercialize fEMR as of right now. The purpose of fEMR is to bring continuity and increase efficiency in transient medical clinics while producing important data that can be used for research purposes.

In terms of the EMR system, we plan on delivering this to the end user in the most intuitive way possible, with as little training as possible. We have come to the conclusion that the best way to approach this is via an open environment that promotes collaboration across the board.

They need help to finish the work. Right now, they have two of six needed iPads. As befits the bootstraps nature of the project, they plan to raise funds with a car wash.

If you know some iPads that are a bit bored and looking for something more interesting to do, drop Zurek a line. He and the WSU team can keep them busy.