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Details for 3 MIPS Performance Categories – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

Last week we got a bit side tracked on MACRA Monday as we covered the news about modifications to the MACRA timeline. That seems to be a welcome change. As we mentioned at the end of our post on the MIPS performance categories and MIPS composite score, now we’re going to start diving into the details of those performance categories starting with: Quality Performance, Resource Use (Cost), and the new Clinical Practice Improvement Activities Category.

Quality Performance Category
This category is a replacement for PQRS, but is a reduction from 9 to only 6 measures. Plus, there is no longer a domain requirement. MIPS also expands the program to include close to 300 measures. To combat this explosion of options, they’ll also be offering specialty specific measure sets so that each specialty can more easily identify the measures that might be best for their specialty.

The Quality Performance category makes up 50% of the MIPS composite score.

Resource Use (Cost) Category
The resource use category is also often called the cost category and is a replacement of the value based modifier. The great part of the resource use category is that there is no data submission required to report your work in this category. Instead, this MIPS category will be calculated based on your Medicare claims. MACRA will add 40+ episodic specific measures so providers have more options to participate in this category.

The Resource Use (Cost) category makes up 10% of the MIPS composite score.

Clinical Practice Improvement Activities Category
The CPIA (Clinical Practice Improvement Activies) category that is the new category created as part of MACRA. It will include 90+ activities to choose from and you must participate in a minimum of one activity. Small practices (ie. 15 or fewer professionals) can participate in 2 activities and receive full credit for CPIA. Practices participating as a Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) also receive full credit for this category. Participation in an APM gives you 50% credit.

The Clinical Practice Improvement Activities category makes up 15% of the MIPS Composite Score.

That’s the general overview for these three MIPS performance categories. We’ll cover the Advancing Care Information category next week since it’s a bit more complicated.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

Modifications to the MACRA 2017 Reporting Period #PickYourPace – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

As we mentioned near the start of the MACRA Monday series, many were predicting a delay or at least a modification to the MACRA timeline. While we’re still waiting for the MACRA final rule to come out with the official changes, Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator of CMS, has announced some of the changes that will be in the MACRA final rule. Here’s the introduction to why they’re making these changes to MACRA (or the Quality Payment Program as they like to call it now):

We heard from physicians and other clinicians on how technology can help with patient care and how excessive reporting can distract from patient care; how new programs like medical homes can be encouraged; and the unique issues facing small and rural non-hospital-based physicians. We will address these areas and the many other comments we received when we release the final rule by November 1, 2016.

It’s comforting to many to know that they hear doctors pleas for help with all the reporting. We’ll see if the changes in the MACRA final rule will be enough.

As part of the announcement, Andy Slavitt said that the MACRA and MIPS program will still begin on January 1, 2017 with payment adjustments (ie. incentives or penalties) being paid in 2019 like we’d noted before. However, CMS now plans to provide multiple options to eligible physicians and other clinicians to avoid the negative payment adjustments in 2019.

There will now be 4 options available:

Option 1 – Test the Quality Payment Program.
For this option, you just have to submit “some data” to the Quality Payment Program and you’ll avoid the negative payment adjustment. Basically, CMS just wants to make sure you’re connected and ready to participate in future years. While you won’t get a negative payment adjustment, you always won’t get a positive adjustment either. It will be interesting to see what the final rule defines as “some data.” I expect it will be pretty minimal.

Option 2 – Participate for part of the calendar year.
This option allows you to submit information for a reduced number of days in 2017. In other words, your performance period could start after January 1, 2017 and you could just do MIPS reporting for part of the year. This would qualify you for a small positive payment adjustment. I’ll be interested to see the details in the MACRA final rule which outlines how much smaller the payment adjustment will be and how it will be calculated.

Option 3 – Participate for the full calendar year.
This option is basically what’s in the MACRA proposed rule. You can take part for the full 2017 calendar year and potentially qualify for a modest positive payment adjustment. CMS suggests that many will be ready for this. We’ll see if that’s the case given the compressed timeline from when the final rule is published and the release cycles of EHR software companies.

Option 4 – Participate in an Advanced Alternative Payment Model in 2017.
It seems that participation in an Advanced APM is the same as the proposed rule. Of course, if you’re participating in an Advanced APM, then you avoid the penalties and don’t have to worry about MIPS. Nothing new there.

It’s no surprise that fewer penalties and looser requirements has been applauded by many in the healthcare community. It’s pretty rare that people complain about a loosening of government regulation and wish they would require more. Personally, I think the changes are a good thing. CMS will still be able to get data from organizations that participate for the full year. Hopefully, they’ll use that to guide any modifications for future years. However, they also aren’t penalizing those organizations who won’t be fully ready in 2017 because of the short timelines.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

CMS Opens Door to Possible MACRA Delay

Posted on July 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In related news to yesterday’s meaningful use REBOOT relief legislation, Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator of CMS, testified about MACRA before the Senate Finance committee. In his hearing, Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), chairman of the committee commented “Physicians will only have about two months before the program goes live. This seems to be a legitimate concern. Considering the MACRA law does give CMS flexibility as to the start of the physician reporting period, what options is CMS considering to make sure this program gets started on the right foot?”

In response to this Slavitt responded that CMS was open to options such as postponing implementation and establishing shorter reporting periods (both of which were widely requested during the MACRA comment period).

Both Slavitt and Senator Hatch talked about the importance of the MACRA legislation not killing the small practice physician. A delay and shorter reporting periods would be a great start. However, so many small practices have been burned by meaningful use that it might be too late for MACRA. It seems that MACRA is dead on arrival for many physicians based on historical experience with meaningful use and certified EHR. I’m not sure CMS could do anything with MACRA to really stem the tide.

This is reflected in a survey that Deloitte recently did to assess physician’s awareness of MACRA. The survey found that 21% of self-employed physicians and those in independently owned medical practices report they are somewhat familiar with MACRA versus 9% of employed physicians surveyed. 32% of physicians only recognize the name.

Basically, physicians barely even know about MACRA. Although, I’m quite sure if we asked them if they liked the MACRA government legislation they’d all say an emphatic No! (Kind of reminds me of Jimmy Kimmel’s Life Witness News) It’s too bad, because if doctors have already been participating in PQRS and Meaningful Use, MACRA won’t be that bad. Of course, the same can’t be said for those that haven’t participated in either program.

During the hearing mentioned above, Senator Hatch highlighted Andy Slavitt’s comment that “the focus must be focused on patients and not measurement.” Plus, he suggested that more needed to be done in this regard. Andy Slavitt responded that they need to reduce the documentation requirements so doctors can spend more time with patients.

Take those comments for what their worth. They’re hearing the right messages and I think they’re heading the right direction. Let’s hope we see that in the MACRA final rule.