Myth: Healthcare Is Different From Other Industries

Posted on May 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you don’t follow David Chou on Twitter, then you’re missing out on some really great content. This is particularly true if you’re a healthcare leader. A good example of this was the following tweet that David shared:

The topic of whether healthcare is different from other industries is an important one that’s worth discussing. The chart above and the research by McKinsey&Company would suggest that healthcare isn’t all that different from other industries. However, I think there’s a nuance in their reality check.

The nuance is that healthcare have similar expectations of healthcare as they do with other non-healthcare companies. However, that doesn’t assume that healthcare consumers act the same as they do in other industries.

There are great examples of this. When you’re in the back of an ambulance after a heart attack, you’re not acting like much of a consumer. They’re taking you to the hospital of their choice and you’re going to largely get the care that the ED feels you need. In what other industry does this occur? There are other examples like elective procedures in healthcare that are very much an experience like other industries.

What the study illustrated above does teach us is that even if the consumer decision making process in healthcare is different, there are core expectations that we have regardless of how we chose to interact with the healthcare system or not. There are some universal tenants and expectations that healthcare should remember:

  • Providing great customer service
  • Delivering on expectations
  • Making life easier
  • Offering great value

I’ve started to see more and more healthcare organizations worry about these tenants of a great patient experience. When you see it broken out like the above, it sounds so simple. Implementing the ideas can be amazingly tricky. However, this is exactly where I see healthcare headed.