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A Model For Fostering Health Data Sharing

Posted on August 8, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Sometimes, I’m amazed by what Facebook’s advertising algorithm can do. While most folks get pitches for hot consumer devices, shoes or casual wear, I get pitched on some cool geek stuff.

Most recently, I got an interesting pitch from data.world, a social networking site that helps members share and discover open datasets. The site is free to join, and if there’s a paid “premium” setting I haven’t found it. From what I’ve seen, this is a pretty nifty model which could easily be adapted for use by health IT organizations.

The site, which looks and feels something like Facebook, features data from a wide range of industries, tilted heavily toward government databases. For example, when I checked in, a front-page column listing the most commonly used tags includes “GIS,” “Homeland Security,” “police,” “SBA” and “DC” (which lead the pack with 688 mentions).

And there’s plenty of healthcare industry data to grab if you’d like. If you search for the term “healthcare” some useful datasets pop up, including a list of last year’s hospital HCAHPS ratings, California-specific data from 2005 to 2014 on the number and rates of preventable hospitalizations for selected medical conditions and New York state data on payments it made under its Medicaid Electronic Health Record Incentive Program. (You’ll have to become a site member to access these records.)

What makes the site truly interesting is the data sharing mechanism it offers. As a member, you have a chance to both upload open datasets, download datasets, post a project or join someone else’s project already in progress. Want help crunching the data on preventable hospitalizations in California? Let other site members know. There’s at least a chance you’ll find great project partners.

Of course, I’m not here to shill for this particular venture. My point in writing about its features is to draw your attention to what it does.

I think it’s more than time for healthcare organizations to collaborate on shared data projects together, and this is perhaps one mechanism for doing so. True, most of the data health systems work with is proprietary, but perhaps it’s possible to work past this issue.

Some healthcare organizations have already decided that sharing otherwise proprietary data is worth the risk. For example, late last year I wrote about a project undertaken by Sioux Falls, SD-based Sanford Health, in which the health system shared clinical data with a handful of academic researchers.  Benson Hsu, MD, vice president of enterprise data and analytics for the system, told Healthcare IT News this “crowdsourced” approached helped Sanford predict risk more effectively and improved its chronic disease management efforts.

Admittedly, Sanford’s approach won’t work for everyone. Today, healthcare organizations aren’t in the habit of cooperating on clinical data analytics projects, and anyone who suggests the idea is likely to get some serious pushback. Yes, in theory we all want interoperability, but this is different. Sharing entire clinical data repositories is a big deal. Still, how are we going to tackle big problems like population health management if we aren’t open to data analytics collaboration?

Sometimes new initiatives happen because people learn to understand each other’s needs, and decide that the prospect of mutual gain is worth the risk. I think a community devoted to data analytics could do much to foster such relationships.

Purpose of Meaningful Use

Posted on August 8, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Lately I’ve been quite disturbed as I’ve read all sorts of commentary about the “Purpose of Meaningful Use.” Here’s one such comment on meaningful use that I read recently:

My impression is that EMRs and meaningful use were about getting Americans to practice evidence-based and comparative effectiveness medicine towards a more streamlined and cost-effective US Healthcare System

Some of you might remember when I questioned the “meaning” of meaningful use as described by Farzhad Mostashari. So, this is not a new subject for me to consider.

Here’s the problem:

The purpose of meaningful use was to be sure the ARRA money was spent on software that doctors actually end up using. Everyone has then taken meaningful use whatever direction they want.

We can certainly talk about the possible impacts and unintended consequences of meaningful use, but let’s not confuse the possible impacts with the purpose of the legislation.

It turns out that meaningful use is actually accomplishing its purpose as I describe it above. At least in Medicare where meaningful use is a requirement there aren’t EHR companies gaming the EHR incentive money like they are in Medicaid. Sure, with self attestation you could lie about your “meaningful use” of an EHR, but I have yet to see it and think it is very unlikely.

You may have noticed that I don’t write about meaningful use as much here on EMR and EHR. That’s because on EMR and HIPAA I (with some great help) have been doing a weekly Meaningful Use Monday series over the past year. Check it out if you’re interested in the details of meaningful use.