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2018 QPP Proposed Rule: What it Means for MIPS & Quantifying the Impact on Specialty Practices – MACRA Monday

Posted on June 26, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Justin Barnes, Board Advisor at iHealth Innovations. This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a Proposed Rule highlighting recommended updates to the 2018 reporting period of the Quality Payment Program (QPP). Like flexibilities extended in 2017, the proposal seeks to further reduce reporting burdens on small practices and rural providers in the program’s second-year reporting period.

Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) reporting track updates include:

  • Increased low-volume exemption thresholds (<200 patients or <$90,000 in payments)
  • New virtual group options for solo practitioners and groups with 10 or fewer Eligible Clinicians
  • Extending “pick your pace” flexibilities into 2018
  • Postponing introduction of the Cost category to MIPS composite scores
  • Factoring MIPS performance improvements into quality scores
  • Permissions for facility-based providers to report through the facility where they do most of their work instead of the practice
  • Permitting the use of 2014 CEHRT in 2018 reporting

The Rule introduces new MIPS bonus point opportunities for:

  • The use of 2015 CEHRT
  • The care of complex patients

Recommendations also extend small practice relief including:

  • Up to 5 bonus points for practices with 15 or fewer Eligible Clinicians
  • Hardship exemption for Advancing Care Information category measures
  • Additional points on Quality measures that don’t meet completeness requirements

Comments on the Proposed Rule are due by August 21, 2017. Physicians have until October 2, 2017, to begin collecting performance data for the inaugural 2017 MIPS reporting period.

Calculating MIPS: The Financial Impact on Specialty Practices

Results from a crowdsourced survey fielded by Black Book Research among nearly 9,000 physician practices from February through April of 2017 reveal that 94 percent of physician participants were unaware or unsure of how to predict their 2017 MIPS performance scores. Seventy-seven percent of practices with three or more clinicians reported intentions to purchase MIPS compliance technology solutions by the fourth quarter of this year, largely driven by an inability to independently determine earning potential under MACRA.

Orthopedics, cardiology and radiology are among the highest incentivized specialties under MIPS. To help specialty practices quantify the fiscal impact MIPS poses, we evaluated average Medicare earnings by specialty to establish the MIPS calculations below. These estimates are based on bare minimum earnings and losses that could be greater for practices with larger Medicare patient populations and/or more physicians. (Calculations are strictly illustrative estimates.)

Cardiology Practices
Estimated average payment adjustment for a 5-clinician cardiology practice in 2019 alone: $43,601
Number of cardiology-specific QPP measures: 20

Orthopedics Practices
Estimated average payment adjustment for a 6-clinician orthopedics practice in 2019 alone: $34,603
Number of orthopedics-specific QPP measures: 21

Radiology Practices
Estimated average payment adjustment for a 6-clinician radiology practice in 2019 alone: $30,117
Number of radiology-specific QPP measures: 22

Note: The above projections assume the full incentive and penalty will be paid out as outlined in the MACRA law. However, the positive and negative payment adjustments will be scaled so the program is budget neutral. This means that the positive payment adjustments will have to be offset by penalties.

Navigating the Transition to MIPS
As clinicians prepare for reporting under MIPS, establishing specialty-specific expertise on financial, clinical and technical objectives can help practices thrive rather than just survive.

Tips as you for prepare for MIPS:

  • Know your reporting options and pick your path.
  • Choose measures that play to the strengths of your specific specialty practice. Review your current billing codes and Quality and Resource Use Report to help determine these areas.
  • Do a technology asset inventory to make sure you can track the required CQMs.
  • Customize your EHR for track your selected measures or ID an outsource vendor to assist.
  • Work towards minimum reporting requirements to avoid a penalty with a stretch goal to report on the full required measures to maximize positive adjustment earnings potential.

Additional resources:
QPP website
An overview and support documentation is available at the CMS QPP website here.

MIPS EDU Program
A new “Quality Payment Program in 2017: Pick Your Pace Web-Based Training” course with Continuing Education Credit is available through the Learning Management System. Learn more here.

2017 CMS-Approved Qualified Clinical Data Registries
Additional specialty-specific measures are available via approved 2017 QCDRs to meet MIPS reporting requirements. Options for cardiology, radiology and orthopedic practices are included. Learn more here.

About the Author:
Justin Barnes is a nationally recognized business and policy advisor who serves as Chairman Emeritus of the HIMSS EHR Association as well as Co-Chairman of the Accountable Care Community of Practice. As Board Advisor with iHealth, Justin assists providers with optimizing revenue sources and transitioning to value-based payment and care delivery models. Justin has formally addressed Congress and the last three Presidential Administrations on more than twenty occasions on the topics of MACRA, value-based medicine, accountable care, interoperability, consumerism and more. He is also host of the weekly syndicated radio show “This Just In.” Justin can be found on Twitter at @HITAdvisor.

There Are Some Things You Just Can’t Do Without an EHR

Posted on March 24, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Tom Giannulli, MD, MS, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kareo. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @drtom_kareo or @GoKareo.
Tom Giannulli - Kareo EHR
Over the past two years, there has been a lot of talk about a big EHR switching trend. Some of this has been because of Meaningful Use, and some of it has been because of market changes. There are simply more options today if you are unhappy with your current EHR.

Surveys show that many physicians are frustrated with the cost or functionality in their EHR, which has prompted considering a switch. There is also frustration with too much third party interference and regulation. Despite some of these challenges, one thing is clear. Most physicians believe EHRs improve care, reduce errors, and improve billing.

What sometimes gets left out are the other opportunities created by using an EHR. Some of these are new revenue sources that might be impossible or very hard to access without one. Here are a few examples, but certainly not the only ones.

Medicare Programs
There are some new codes that have come out in the last two years for services that are revenue generators, but you really do need an EHR to manage them. The first is transitional care management (TCM). While TCM doesn’t require you to use an EHR, the complexity of it makes it hard to do without one. The ability to easily put in your notes and set reminders for needed follow up makes managing TCM much easier. With reimbursement ranging anywhere from about $100 to over $200 per patient, this can be a great opportunity for providers who see many patients who need post hospitalization follow ups.

The other Medicare program is newer and does require the use of a certified EHR. It is the Chronic Care Management (CCM) code that came out this year. The reimbursement is about $42 per patient and can be billed once a month. The requirement is that the patient has two or more chronic conditions that are expected to last at least 12 months or until the patient’s death. Clinical staff must spend at least 20 minutes performing CCM services for the patient each month that the code it billed. The services are non-face-to-face and direct supervision is not required, which means that nursing staff or non-physician practitioners can render CCM even if the physician is not in the office. Again, if your practice sees a lot of patients with chronic health problems, this can be a great way to add revenue by using nursing or mid-level staff.

Affordable Care Act Opportunities
By now I hope everyone knows that preventive care services are covered with no copays or deductibles. What many providers still aren’t very aware of are the other types of programs that are now covered by insurance that can be great revenue generators. While they don’t require an EHR, this is another area where using an EHR makes running these programs much easier. The two programs that make a lot of sense for primary care providers and specialists who see patients with certain types of qualifying conditions are group visits and weight loss programs.

With group visits, the practice identifies a group of patients who have a similar, chronic condition that requires frequent visits. You can do this using your EHR (it would be tough using paper charts). Some examples include HIV, chronic pain, COPD, and hypertension. Vitals are done individually as patients arrive and then the whole group spends the rest of the 1.5 – 2 hour visit together with the provider. Once a group visit is completed, each patient’s insurance is billed for the appropriate E&M code for their individual situation. The ability to use templates and copy note features in the EHR can make documenting after the group visit much faster and easier than it would be if done by hand.

For patients with certain conditions, a weight loss program may be mostly or fully covered by insurance like preventive care. The great thing about this is that it can be as simple or complex as you are willing to manage. You can do simple nutritional counseling and weigh-ins or go for a fully formed program through a third party that includes food and supplements. Again, using an EHR makes it much easier and faster to manage and track multiple follow up appointments, set reminders, and copy notes and simply update them each time. You can even have a group visit component!

The key to all of these opportunities is that an EHR helps reduce the complexity of managing the requirements and helps insure that you can quickly and easily show accurate, thorough documentation to payers. Without an EHR, these revenue generating programs would simply seem too difficult to manage. In a time when every penny counts, you can’t ignore opportunities like these.

Kareo, the leading provider of cloud-based software and services for independent medical practices, is a sponsor of EMR and EHR. Find out more about Kareo’s award-winning solutions at http://www.kareo.com/.

Creative EMR Price Reduction

Posted on November 12, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always love creativity and so I have to give credit to the marketing people at meridianEMR. They’re providing an interesting price reduction in their EMR that keys off of many physicians anger over the potential 21.9% Medicare reimbursement cuts. Here’s a few portions from the meridianEMR offer:

In order to provide physicians with relief from Medicare fix uncertainty, meridianEMR is offering a special “meridianEMR Doc Fix.” This includes a 21.9% reduction on all new meridianEMR system orders for new Urology customers starting November 10, 2010 and ending December 31, 2010. This unprecedented offer during these uncertain times directly reflects one of the core values of meridianEMR, which is partnership with clients.

“If the government does not rescind the “Doc Fix” of 21.9%, our offer still stands. We encourage our potential new clients to move forward with confidence that they will be receiving the market leading Urology EHR at the most affordable price ever offered by meridianEMR. This is our way of standing by their side in a challenging economic environment,” commented Lawrence Drappi, Executive Vice President, meridianEMR.

I’m sure that many doctors will appreciate the gesture. Pretty creative to key off of cuts that have been seen as such a negative thing. I wonder if other EMR vendors will follow their lead. Many of the EHR software out there could use at least a 21.9% cost reduction.