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Working on Value Based Care and Fee For Service at the Same Time

Posted on November 2, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at MGMA I had a chance to sit down with Mike Hofmeister, Vice President of Value-Based & Community Solutions at Allscripts, to talk about Allscripts’ Chronic Care Management (CCM) and other value based care efforts. Coming out of MGMA I’d say that Chronic Care Management (CCM) was one of the biggest topics people were talking about.

What’s a bit unique about CCM is that it’s a hybrid of value based care in a fee for service world. In fact, when I asked Mike about how Allscripts was balancing value based care with fee for service he told me that they were looking at opportunities to implement processes, procedures, and workflows that benefited both value based care and fee for service.

I found this to be an incredible insight into the path forward for those of us trying to figure out how to navigate this new value based reimbursement world. No doubt there are plenty of efforts that can satisfy both sides of the equation. The reality is that we can’t just flip the value based care switch on and the fee for service switch off. We’re going to be living in a hybrid reimbursement world for a long time to come.

Mike also told me about how Allscripts was well positioned to help with doctor’s CCM efforts because at the core of the CCM program is access to healthcare data, analytics capabilities, and call center capabilities to follow up with the patients. Sure, there are a few more details to the program, but Mike is right that CCM requires the right healthcare data, data processing, and the right patient follow up procedures. For many patients a phone call is still the best follow up procedure. Although, I’m still interested to see how quickly this switches over to secure text from phone calls.

What seems clear to me is that most provider organizations aren’t going to take part in CCM on their own. A few larger ones will try it, but most provider organizations will be looking to an outside company to help them participate in the CCM program together with a larger group of providers.

Of course, we also have to realize that CCM is just the start. The companies that deliver great CCM solutions will be well positioned to deliver on future value based care programs. They’ll just want to make sure that they balance their value based care work together with the ongoing fee for service world.

Prematurely Calling the End of Small Practices

Posted on October 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I continue to hear people predicting the death of small practices. In fact, I’ve met many vendor executives that have essentially started treating small practices as an extinct species. While there are certainly a lot of pressures and challenges associated with running a small practice today, we’re far from the end of small practices.

The biggest challenge to small practices is these major hospital systems that are buying up small practices left and right. We’ve seen this happen all over the country and they’ve become extremely dominant in some parts of the country. No doubt this is a threat to many of the small practices out there and is worth watching.

While many hospital systems are buying up practices, I over heard Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright, President and CEO of MGMA, make a really interesting counter point to this trend. The media and the acquiring hospital systems love to talk about small practices being acquired. However, we don’t give the same coverage to all of the doctors who leave a hospital system or those practices which get divested from a hospital system because they’re not working out as expected.

What does this mean? It means we hear about all of the small practices being acquired, but we don’t really hear about the small practices that leave the hospital system. This means we likely have a false impression of how many small practices actually still exist. I still know of many in my local area and I’m sure you do too. They just don’t get the same coverage as the large systems.

I do think that this current health care environment is harder for small practices than it was previously. The shift to value based care will continue that pressure. However, I heard over and over at MGMA about small practices coming together with vendors to be able to receive the benefits of value based reimbursement while still maintaining their independence.

Certainly this is no longer your father and your grandfather’s healthcare system. However, I still think the small practice is alive and will be for a long time to come.

Chronic Care Management Infographic

Posted on October 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Smartlink Mobile Systems has put out an infographic that looks at interest in the chronic care management program by physicians. This data is quite interesting since the chronic care management program has been one of the popular topics at the MGMA annual conference this week. There’s a lot of discussion about the program and a lot of organizations trying to work out how to do the program effectively. I think that’s illustrated in the graphic below.
Chronic Care Management Infographic

What do you think of the Chronic Care Management program? Are you participating? Are you planning to participate? I’m sure we’ll be writing a lot more about this in the future.

Bold Insights from the #MGMA15 Keynote Kickoff

Posted on October 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday was the start of the MGMA Annual conference in Nashville. The event kicked off with a really great opening keynote from MGMA’s President and CEO Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright. While most keynotes from organization Presidents are boring and dry, I loved how candid and straight forward Dr. Fischer-Wright was in her comments. She definitely is pushing forward a new vision for the organization.

Here’s some highlights I tweeted from her keynote:


This reminds me of my post on EHR induced PTSD. I could have easily called that post Healthcare Buzzword induced PTSD.


Pretty brave of her to be so bold. I’ll be interested to hear people’s reactions.


I agree with her that Healthcare has changed, but I’d also argue that healthcare is still changing. That just compounds the problem.


I agree that apathy is an extraordinary challenge. Most doctors and healthcare professionals feel paralyzed and feel that they can’t do anything to make a difference or change the trajectory of where healthcare is headed. That’s a good thing since that’s a perception you can change. Apathy because people don’t care would be a much harder challenge.


This leads to some apathy as well, but also is converting to anger.

Needless to say I was impressed by Dr. Fischer-Wright. Appropriately, Jeremy Gutsche spoke after Dr. Fischer-Wright and commented about the need of organizations and people to take risks and fail. Much of the learning we get comes from taking risks and accepting that sometimes we’re going to fail. I think that’s where Dr. Fischer-Wright is taking the MGMA organization. She’s looking at big, ambitious goals. She might fail at some, but I predict that those that don’t fail are going to make a big difference.