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Mobile EHR Access Is Maturing

Posted on August 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today I read a story that surprised me, though perhaps it shouldn’t have. A clinician, writing for a publication called Diagnostic Imaging, suggests that a “mobile EHR” is emerging, a new entity which embraces mobile technology rather than treating it as an add-on. I wasn’t surprised that this was happening, but it is remarkable that it’s taken us so long to get to this point.

As Saroj Misra, DO, notes, healthcare organizations are rolling out infrastructure for clinicians to access EHR data via mobile devices, and EHR vendors are ramping up development of mobile interfaces for their systems. And physicians are responding. According to a recent Physicians Practice survey, 78% of physicians are now using mobile-accessible EHRs, and more than 85% of doctors and practices were using mobile devices to do their jobs.

As he sees it there were three big issues which previously held back the development of mobile EHRs:

  • Mobile device screens were too small, and battery life was inadequate.
  • EHR vendors hadn’t created interfaces which worked effectively with mobile devices
  • Healthcare organizations weren’t convinced that mobile EHR access protected health data sufficiently

Today, these problems have receded into the background. Screens have gotten larger, battery life has been extended, and while security is always an issue, standards for protecting mobile data are gradually emerging. Also, healthcare organizations are developing mobile device management policies which help to address BYOD issues.

In response, EHR developers are embracing mobile EHR access. There’s vendors like drchrono, which is a mobile-native EHR, but that’s not all.  Other ambulatory vendors, like athenahealth, describe themselves as a “provider of network-enabled services for electronic health records,” and MEDITECH’s Web Ambulatory app runs on a tablet.  Also, Cerner’s PowerChart Touch solution is built for the Apple iPad.

At this point, I truly wonder why all EHRs aren’t developed primarily with mobile deployment in mind. Physicians have been engaged mobile device users since smartphones and tablets first emerged, and the need for them to manage patients on the go has only increased over time. I know desktops still have their place, but the reality is that empowering physicians to take patient data with them is overwhelmingly sensible.

My sense, after researching this post, is that ongoing security worries are probably the biggest roadblock to further mobile EHR deployment. And I understand why, of course. After all, many of the major health data breaches occur thanks to a stolen laptop “walking away” when it’s left unattended, and mobile devices may be just as vulnerable.

That being said, the benefits of giving doctors an elegant mobile EHR solution are substantial. With the right targeted security policies in place, I believe the benefits of robust mobile EHR deployment – particularly giving clinicians on-the-spot data access and getting immediate data back — far outweigh these risks. I sincerely hope the HIT software industry agrees!

Mobile EHR Use

Posted on November 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most fascinating sessions I attended recently was by Mihai Fonoage talking about the “Future of Mobile” at EMA Nation (Modernizing Medicine’s EHR user conference where I was keynote). At the start of the presentation, Mihai provided a bunch of really interesting data points about the EMA EHR use on mobiles:

  • 3,500,000 Screens Viewed Daily
  • 50,000 New Visits Each Day
  • 35,000 Photos Taken Daily
  • 12,000 New Consents Each Day
  • 8,000 Rx Prescribed Daily

The most shocking number there is the 35,000 photos taken daily. That’s a lot of photos being stored in the EHR. It is worth noting that Modernizing Medicine has a huge footprint in dermatology where photos are very common and useful. Even so, that’s a lot of photos being taken and inputted into an EHR.

The other stats are nearly as astounding when you think that Modernizing Medicine is only in a small set of specialities. 3.5 million screens (similar to pageviews on a website) viewed daily is a lot of mobile EHR use. In fact, I asked Modernizing Medicine what percentage of their users used their desktop client and what percentage used their iPad interface. Modernizing Medicine estimated that 80% of their EHR use is on iPads. This is a hard number to verify, but I can’t tell you the number of people at EMA Nation I saw pull out their iPads and log into their EMA EHR during the user conference. You could tell that the EMA iPad app was their native screen.

I still remember when I first saw the ClearPractice iPad EHR called Nimble in 2010. It was the first time I’d seen someone really make a deep effort to do an EHR on the iPad. DrChrono has always made a big iPad EHR effort as well. I’d love to see how their iPad EHR use compares to the Modernizing Medicine EMA EHR numbers above. Can any other EHR vendor get even close to 80% EHR use on an iPad application or any of the numbers above?

I’d love to hear what you’re seeing and experiencing with EHR iPad and other mobile EHR use. Is Modernizing Medicine leading the pack here or are their other EHR competitors that are seeing similar adoption patterns with their mobile EHR product lines?

Full Disclosure: Modernizing Medicine is an advertiser on this site.

Using PIMSY EMR on an iPad and Android Device

Posted on May 30, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the regular EMR and EHR readers, Judy, recently took up the challenge I posed in my previous post about Every EMR Vendor available on the iPad. She downloaded the LogMeIn Ignition app that I mentioned in that post and tried out her PIMSY EMR software on it. Thanks to Judy for sharing her experience.

The following is her experience and review.

I tested the new LogMeIn app to see if I could access PIMSY EMR from my older Droid and from an iPad. It takes a little getting used to: you have to familiarize yourself with how to navigate on the screen and how to change the size to get the screen view that works for you. Once you get that done you are good to go. That said, there are 2 ways to change the size: a magnifying option at the bottom of the screen or a zoom in bar on the right hand side; you can enlarge as much as needed. There are also 2 options for moving around: you can move the screen with your finger (the cursor stays put) or you can move the cursor like a regular mouse; I prefer navigating around the cursor. Both options make it simple to maneuver.

If you’re used to texting and typing on a smaller keyboard, it will be easier to adjust. The app itself gives you a keyboard that takes up approximately half the size of the screen, so larger phone screens like Droid 2 or iPhone would have a bigger keyboard than a regular Droid, and the iPhone keyboard was comparable to a regular size. For those who aren’t used to navigating and typing on a phone screen, there will be an adjustment period. If you’re connected to dual monitors, you can easily switch to either one, and I was able to watch a video.

The speed is slightly slower from phone or iPad to computer but very good from computer to computer. The app is not offered on a Blackberry. I would highly recommend this app to anyone who wants to connect to their desktop remotely; it worked great to get into PIMSY. Well worth $29.99.