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Leveraging New Age Technology to Overcome MACRA Challenges – MACRA Monday

Posted on August 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Dr. David A. Goldman, CEO and founder, Goldman Eye and Ophthalmology Team Lead, Anterior Segment at Modernizing Medicine.  This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

MACRA and the Quality Payment Program (QPP) were implemented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to improve healthcare by focusing on the quality of care provided to patients. There are two paths under the QPP: the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track which covers most clinicians, and the Advanced Alternate Payment Models (APMs) track which applies to providers who have taken on some risk related to patient outcomes (Medicare Shared Savings 2,3 and Next Gen ACO participants for example).

MACRA and MIPS are intended to advance quality based care by implementing outcome-based payment adjustments. Providers will be measured across a number of different performance categories and will be paid on a curve. By 2022, physicians who outperform their peers may receive up to a 9 percent positive payment adjustment on their Medicare reimbursements based on their performance in 2020. Those who report poor performance may receive up to a 9 percent negative payment adjustment on their Medicare reimbursements in 2022.

Specialtyspecific Measures & Bonus Points

As previously mentioned, if you perform better than your peers when it comes to MIPS, you can substantially increase your Medicare reimbursements. Conversely, reporting a score below the performance threshold could prevent you from receiving a positive payment adjustment on your Medicare reimbursements, and not reporting on MIPS could cause you to be penalized.

Some MIPS categories will be the same across all specialties such as Advancing Care Information and Improvement Activities, whereas others can be geared towards a specialty, like Quality. Quality accounts for 60 percent of your total MIPS score in 2017. As an Eligible Clinician (EC), you should select six measures, including one Outcome Measure or if an Outcome Measure is not available, a High Priority Measure. After your first Outcome or High Priority Measure, any additional ones you report will count towards your bonus points (up to six points). In addition, an EC can earn another six points by doing end-to-end reporting. More information on the measure specifications can be found here.

Under the Advancing Care Information (ACI) category, ECs have the option to earn 5 bonus points by being in active engagement with a specialized registry, which are typically specialty-specific. The third category of MIPS is called Improvement Activities (IAs) which has over 90 activities to choose from. ECs, regardless of specialty, can choose activities that apply to their practice size and way of practicing like expanded practice access and closing the referral loop. Depending on the IA selected, ECs can also earn a 10 point bonus under the ACI category.

How can we turn this change into an opportunity?

A major factor in succeeding in MIPS is the use of today’s latest technology. Innovative electronic health record (EHR) systems, which can collect and organize clinical data in a structured format, empower doctors to extract meaningful insights at the patient and population levels. Instead of relying on any one physician’s narrative assessment or unstructured data for a diagnosis or treatment, physicians who have access to an interoperable platform can reference relative findings from their peers while eliminating redundancies, automating communications and improving patient outcomes.

How Do You Track Your Performance

The answer is certainly not using pen and paper. Look for a certified EHR vendor that has technology which provides services and products that can track data in real time and provide analytics to show your progress and outcomes. You want MIPS intelligence directly built-in to your EHR system.

Modernizing Medicine offers a specialty-specific suite of products and services that gives physicians added support. modmed Ophthalmology™ helps ophthalmologists transition to MIPS by providing them with quality data and reporting capabilities with the products and services they provide. Included within the suite is the company’s flagship EHR system, EMA™. EMA provides functionality for automated quality data capture, population health registries, real patient engagement and analytical tools, plus the ability to submit MIPS right to CMS.

I have been utilizing EMA for the past few years and am also a team lead on Modernizing Medicine’s ophthalmology team. As a practicing ophthalmologist, I have gone through the process of spending countless hours documenting patient reporting following a long day in the office. Couple that with ensuring my compliance measures are in check – it adds up. Now, my measures are completed efficiently, accurately and securely, ready to be submitted to CMS at the end of my reporting period. I even led a webinar on the topic of MIPS, if you want to see it in action.

EHR System Checklist for MIPS

From my unique perspective of working for an EHR vendor and utilizing the certified technology in my practice, I’ve shared a few qualities to look for in an EHR to support your reporting needs:

  • 2014 / 2015 ONC Certified
  • Integrated MIPS intelligence
  • Built in Improvement Activities
  • Qualified MIPS Registry
  • Automated data capturing and reporting
  • Built-in, real-time analytics reporting for Quality, Resource Use, Advancing Care Information and Improvement Activities
  • A vendor with an all-in on solution, including the ability to submit MIPS right to CMS
  • Advisory services and consultation during MIPS transition and reporting

While there is much work to be done in terms of keeping up with and understanding today’s fast-paced healthcare landscape, one thing is for certain – the proper use of specialty-specific technology can help alleviate hours of extra work, stress and physician burnout. As noted above, there are certain aspects of MACRA that apply across all specialties, whereas others are specialty-specific and working with a vendor that can guide you along this MIPS journey can be crucial to your financial success.

David A. Goldman, M.D. is the Ophthalmology Team Lead, Anterior Segment at Modernizing Medicine and founder of Goldman Eye in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

ONC To Farm Out Certification Testing To Private Sector – MACRA Monday

Posted on August 14, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

EHR certification has been a big part of the meaningful use program and is now part of MACRA as well. After several years of using health IT certification testing tools developed by government organizations, the ONC has announced plans to turn the development of these tools over to the private sector.

Since its inception, ONC has managed its health IT’s education program internally, developing automated tools designed to measure health IT can compliance with certification requirements in partnership with the CDC, CMS and NIST. However, in a new blog post, Office of Standards and Technology director Steven Posnack just announced that ONC would be transitioning development of these tools to private industry over the next five years.

In the post, Posnack said that farming out tool development would bring diversity to certification effort and help it perform optimally. “We have set a goal…to include as many industry-developed and maintained testing tools as possible in lieu of taxpayer financed testing tools,” Posnack wrote. “Achieving this goal will enable the Program to more efficiently focus its testing resources and better aligned with industry-developed testing tools.”

Readers, I don’t have any insider information on this, but I have to think this transition was spurred (or at least sped up) by the eClinicalWorks certification debacle.  As we reported earlier this year, eCW settled a whistleblower lawsuit for $155 million a few months ago;  in the suit, the federal government asserted that the vendor had gotten its EHR certified by faking its capabilities. Of course the potential cuts to ONC’s budget could have spurred this as well.

I have no reason to believe that eCW was able to beat the system because ONC’s certification testing tools were inadequate. As we all know, any tool can be tricked if you throw the right people at the problem. On the other hand, it can’t hurt to turn tool development over to the private sector. Of course, I’m not suggesting that government coders are less skilled than private industry folks (and after all, lots of government technology work is done by private contractors), but perhaps the rhythms of private industry are better suited to this task.

It’s worth noting that this change is not just cosmetic. Poznack notes that with private industry at the helm, vendors may need to enter into new business arrangements and assume new fees depending on who has invested in the testing tools, what it costs to administer them and how the tools are used.

However, I’d be surprised if private sector companies that develop certification arrangements will stay tremendously far from the existing model. Health IT vendors may want to get their products certified, but they’re likely to push back hard if private companies jack up the price for being evaluated or create business structures that don’t work.

Honestly, I’d like to see the ONC stay on this path. I think it works best as a sort of think tank focused on finding best practices health IT companies across government and private industry, rather than sweating the smaller stuff as it has in recent times. Otherwise, it’s going to stay bogged down in detail and lose whatever thought leadership position it may have.

Is The ONC Still Relevant?

Posted on July 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, I read an article in Healthcare IT News reporting on the latest word from the ONC. Apparently, during a recent press call, National Coordinator Donald Rucker, MD, gave an update on agency activities without sharing a single new idea.

Now, if I were the head of the ONC, I might do the same. I’m sure it played well with the wire services and daily newspapers reporters, most of whom don’t dig in to tech issues like interoperability too deeply.

But if I were wiseacre health IT blogger (and I am, of course) I’d react a bit differently. By which I mean that I would wonder aloud, very seriously, if the ONC is even relevant anymore. To be fair, I can’t judge the agency’s current efforts by what it said at a press conference, but I’m not going to ignore what was said, either.

According to HIN, the ONC sees developing a clear definition of interoperability, improving EMR usability and getting a better understanding of information blocking as key objectives.

To address some of these issues, Dr. Rucker apparently suggested that using open APIs, notably RESTful APIs like JSON, would be important to future EMR interoperability efforts. Reportedly, he’s also impressed with the FHIR standard, because it’s a modern API and because large vendors have very get some work with the SMART project.

To put it kindly, I doubt any of this was news to the health IT press.

Now, I’m not saying that Dr. Rucker got anything wrong, exactly. It’s hard to argue that we’re far behind when it comes to EMR usability, embarrassingly so. In fact, if we address that issue many of EMR-related efforts aren’t worth much. That being said, much of the rest strikes me as, well, lacking originality and/or substance.

Addressing interoperability by using open APIs? I’m pretty sure someone the health IT business has thought that through before. If Dr. Rucker knows this, why would he present this as a novel idea (as seems to be the case)? And if he doesn’t, is the agency really that far behind the curve?

Establishing full interoperability with FHIR? Maybe, someday. But at least as of a year ago, FHIR product director Grahame Grieve argued that people are “[making] wildly inflated claims about what is possible, [willfully] misunderstanding the limits of the technology and evangelizing the technology for all sorts of ill-judged applications.”  If Grieve thinks people are exaggerating FHIR’s capabilities, does ONC bring anything useful to the table by endorsing it?

Understanding information blocking?  Well, perhaps, but I think we already know what’s going on. At its core, this is a straightforward business use: EMR vendors and many of their customers have an incentive to make health data sharing tough. Until they have a stronger incentive share data, they won’t play ball voluntarily. And studying a much-studied problem probably won’t help things much.

To be clear, I’m relying on HIN as a source of facts here. Also, I realize that Dr. Rucker may have been simplifying things in an effort to address a general audience.

But if my overall impression is right, the news from this press conference isn’t encouraging. I would have hoped that by 2017, ONC would be advancing the ball further, and telling us something we truly didn’t know already. If it’s not sharing new ideas by this point, what good can it do? Maybe that’s why the rumors of HHS budget cuts could hit ONC really hard.

Patient Access to Health Information is a Right

Posted on April 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was browsing some old notes I’d taken to interesting resources and ideas. I came across some videos that ONC had created around the rights of patients when it comes to accessing health information.

Here’s a look at the first video:

The video is 3 minutes long and the information could have been shared in 30 seconds, but some of the points it shares are really good. For example, that it’s your right to be able to access your health information. Also, they make the point that you still have the right to get access to your health information even if you haven’t paid your bill.

It’s always amazing to me how many misconceptions there are out there when it comes to access to health information. We see HIPAA and other rules used as a reason to not provide patients their health information a lot and it’s often wrong.

The great thing is that over the 11 years I’ve been blogging, we’ve seen a real sea change in people’s perspectives on how and when you should have access to your patient record. That said, we still have a ways to go. Technology should make that record available to you whenever and wherever you want in near real time fashion. We see that in some organizations, but not enough.

These videos will never go viral, but they are a good information source for those patients who aren’t sure about their rights when it comes to access to their health information.

Will MACRA Be Repealed or Replaced? – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

I’ve heard a lot of doctors still suggesting that MACRA is going to disappear. I’ve heard every argument imaginable, but the most common one is that the Trump administration is going to get rid of MACRA. While I can understand this fear, I don’t think it has any real foundation. In fact, I think the opposite is true.

As Neil Versel aptly points out, the Repeal and Replace legislation that didn’t quite make it through the house was silent on healthcare IT. I love how Neil puts it:

Wondering what the proposed American Health Care Act—the Republican plan to “repeal and replace” the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act—says about health IT?

Nothing. It says nothing.

Wondering what the American Health Care Act says about promoting innovation in healthcare?

Nothing. It says nothing.

Wondering what the American Health Care Act says about holding providers accountable for the care they deliver or about moving away from the inefficient—and often dangerous—fee-for-service reimbursement model?

You guessed it. Nothing. Nada. Zero.

The closest things we’ve heard about the new administration impacting healthcare IT is Tom Price saying that he wants MACRA to not put undue burden on doctors and the possibility that ONC could be on the chopping block.

The former is something that every person at HHS has said for years. No doubt Tom Price is a more provider-friendly HHS secretary than past administrations but given the legislation, I don’t think Tom Price will change MACRA much. As to the later, even if they get rid of ONC, that doesn’t mean MACRA will disappear. It’s still the law of the land. MACRA would just move to another part of HHS. Look at it more as a corporate reorg versus something that will significantly impact MACRA.

All in all, the fact that technology was never really part of the repeal and replace discussion gives me more confidence that MACRA isn’t going anywhere. What do you think? Will MACRA survive? Are there other factors that could influence MACRA’s future?

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

GAO: HHS Should Tighten Up Its Patient Data Access Efforts

Posted on March 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The Government Accountability Office has issued a new report arguing, essentially, that while its heart is in the right place, HHS isn’t doing enough to track the effectiveness of patient health data access efforts. The report names ONC as arguably the weakest link here, and calls on the HHS-based organization to track its outreach programs more efficiently.

As readers know, CMS has spent a vast sum of money (over $35 billion at this point) to support health IT adoption and health data access. And while these efforts have spilled over to some patients, it’s still an uphill battle getting the others to access their electronic health information, the GAO report says.

Moreover, even patients that are accessing data face some significant challenges, including the inability to aggregate their longitudinal health information from multiple sources into a single, accessible record, the agency notes. (In other words, patients crave interoperability and data integration too!)

Unfortunately, progress on this front continues to be slow. For example, after evaluating data from the 2015 Medicare EHR Program, GAO researchers found that few patients were taking a look at data made available by their participating provider. In fact, while 88 percent of the program’s hospitals gave patients access to data, only 15 percent of patients actually accessed the information which was available.  When professionals provided patients with data access, the number of patients accessing such data climbed to 30 percent, but that’s not as big a delta as it might seem, given that 87 percent of such providers offered patient data access.

Patient reluctance to dive in to their EHI may be in part due to the large number of differing portals offered by individual providers. With virtually every doctor and hospital offering their own portal version, all but the most sophisticated patients get overwhelemed. In addition to staying on top of the information stored in each portal, patients typically need to manage separate logins and passwords for each one, which can be awkward and time-consuming.

Also, the extent of data hospitals and providers offer varies widely, which may lead to patient confusion. The Medicare EHR Program requires that participants make certain information available – such as lab test results and current medications – but less than half of participating hospitals (46 percent) and just 54 percent of healthcare professionals routinely offered access to clinician notes.

The process for sharing out patient data is quite variable as well. For example, two hospitals interviewed by the GAO had a committee decide which data patients could access. Meanwhile, one EHR vendor who spoke with the agency said it makes almost all information available to patients routinely via its patient portal. Other providers take the middle road. In other words, patients have little chance to adopt a health data consumption routine.

Technical access problems and portal proliferation pose significant enough obstacles, but that’s not the worst part of the story. According to the GAO, the real problem here is that ONC – the point “man” on measuring the effectiveness of patient data access efforts – hasn’t been as clear as it could be.

The bottom line, for GAO, is that it’s time to figure out what enticements encourage patients to access their data and which don’t. Because the ONC hasn’t developed measures of effectiveness for such patient outreach efforts, parent agency HHS doesn’t have the information needed to tell whether outreach efforts are working, the watchdog agency said.

If ONC does improve its methods for measuring patient health data access, the benefits could extend beyond agency walls. After all, it wouldn’t hurt for doctors and hospitals to boost patient engagement, and getting patients hooked on their own data is step #1 in fostering engagement. So let’s hope the ONC cleans up its act!

Encouraged By Political Changes, Groups Question ONC Functions

Posted on March 21, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Riding on an anti-regulation drive backed by the White House, groups unhappy with some actions by ONC are fighting to rein it in. President Trump has said that he would like to see two regulations killed for every new reg, and the groups seemingly see this as an opening.

One group challenging ONC activities is HealthIT Now, a coalition of providers, payers, employers and patient groups.

In a letter to HHS Secretary Tom Price, Health IT Now argues that ONC exceeded its authority last year, when it backed an oversight rule designed to boost the certification process by evaluating vendor interoperability capabilities.

The 2016 rule also holds health IT vendors accountable for technology flaws that could compromise patient safety, an approach which, HITN argues, steals a move from federal agencies such as the FDA. The group also contends that ONC has not been clear about its criteria for critiquing HIT solutions for safety problems.

Meanwhile, a group of medical societies and specialties is asking federal health officials to hold off on 2015 EHR certification requirements, which providers are expected to start using January 2018, for at least one year. The group notes that since ONC released its final 2015 Edition requirements, few vendors – in fact, just 54 of 3,700 products currently certified – have fully upgraded their systems.

Given this situation, rushing to deploy the latest certification requirements could create big problems, including a major disruption to medical practices’ business, the coalition argues.

If they’re forced to choose from the small number of systems which have upgraded their platforms, “physicians may be driven to switch vendors and utilize a system that is not suitable for their specialty or patient population,” the group said in a letter to CMS acting administrator Patrick Conway, MD, and acting ONC national coordinator Jon White, MD.

In addition to addressing certification concerns, there’s much the federal government can do to support health IT improvement, according to attendees at HIMSS17.

According to HITN, attendees would like policymakers to address interoperability, in part by reviewing Meaningful Use and the ONC Voluntary Certification programs; to focus on improving patient identification systems, and avoid imposing barriers to private market solutions; to clarify the role of the ONC in the marketplace; and to encourage the use of real-world evidence in healthcare and health IT deployment.

As I see it, these ideas veer between close-in detail and broad policy prescriptions, neither of which seem likely to have a big effect on their own.

On the one hand, while it might help to clarify ONC’s role, authority and process, the truth is that the health IT market isn’t living or dying on what it does. This is particularly the case given its revolving door leaders with too little time to do more than nudge the industry.

Meanwhile, it seems equally unlikely that the federal government will come up with generally-applicable policy prescriptions which can solve nasty problems like achieving health data interoperability and sorting out patient matching issues.

I’m not saying that government has no role in supporting the emergence of health IT solutions. In fact, I’m fairly confident that we won’t get anywhere without its assistance. However, until we have a more effective role for its involvement, government efforts aren’t likely to bear much fruit.

MACRA and MIPS Training and Resources – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While we’ve covered a lot of ground in this MACRA Monday series, there are still a lot of details we haven’t covered. I’ve been debating how deep into the weeds of MACRA and MIPS we should go or not as part of this series. We’d love to hear your thoughts.

We’re partially reticent to go really deep, because there’s a lot of great resources out there to dive deeply into MACRA and MIPS. Plus, we don’t see many people doing higher level strategic decision making content that has opinions about what your organization should or shouldn’t do when it comes to MACRA.

If you’re looking for some deeper training on MACRA and MIPS, we’ll highlight a few courses and trainings out there that we know about.

4Med MIPS and MACRA Training
The people at 4Med have a whole series of training for MIPS and MACRA. They have a lot of past experience doing training for meaningful use and PQRS and they’re continuing that with their latest MACRA and MIPS Training. Here’s a look at some of the courses they have coming up (Note: each of these links automatically gives you a discount on each course):

MACRA-MIPS Quality Project Manager – Starts March 29 – A nice course focused on the quality portion of MIPS.

Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Workshop – Starts May 3 – This goes beyond MIPS and MACRA, but is all part of the related trend.

HIPAA Compliance Officer – Starts April 19 – This isn’t really a MIPS and MACRA course, but they require you to do a HIPAA Risk Assessment, so this course could help you make sure you’re ready to fulfill that requirement. Plus, this is a good course given the importance of security in healthcare these days.

4 Med offers a number of other courses including an Advancing Care Information course as well, but it’s not scheduled right now. We’ll update you in the future as those courses are scheduled. Instead of the live training options above, you can also purchase the online version of these courses. If you use the promo code: HITC you’ll get 20% off those online versions.

MIPS Boot Camp
Another option to consider is this MIPS Boot Camp course offered by Jim Tate and Wayne Singer. The course is only 1.5 hours, but Jim is a true expert in this area and so it will be a great starter course. They obviously are trying to push their MyMipsScore™ App, but that might be something useful for readers as well.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

What Do Doctors Need to Know About MACRA and MIPS? – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While at the HIMSS 2017 conference, I had a chance to do a video interview with MACRA expert, Alexandria (Alex) J. Goulding, Public Policy Manager at iHealth. We cover a broad range of MACRA topics focused on the practical things that doctors should know about MACRA and MIPS.

You can find the full MACRA video interview at the bottom or click any of the links below to skip to a specific answer:

Do you have other perspectives and insights that you’d add to what Alex Goulding offered above? Please share them in the comments.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

A New MACRA Tools Market – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 6, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

One thing we’ve realized writing MACRA Monday is that there’s an insatiable appetite for MACRA right now. Webinar signups are through the roof when it’s on the topic of MACRA and MIPS. MACRA and MIPS training courses are selling like hot cakes. Everyone is trying to get the information they need to deal with MACRA and MIPS.

After talking with many companies at HIMSS, there’s a whole new market being created for tools that help organizations track and attest for MACRA as well. Of course, every EHR vendor is creating a solution for their providers. However, there are a lot of other companies that are looking at this as a big opportunity for them to provide tools to make tracking and reporting MACRA and MIPS easy.

Two companies that I ran into recently in this space are SA Ignite and SPH Analytics.

Both of these companies are focusing on MACRA, APM, and MIPS reporting at the higher end. We’re talking about hospital systems that have 100 medical practices and so they have a few hundred doctors who need to do MACRA reporting. Can you imagine managing that many attestations on Excel or something? That’s why I think these tools are going to become so popular.

A part of me hates that entire companies are being created around government attestation. However, the realist in me understands that these tools are needed by large health systems that have to comply with government requirements or lost a lot of money.

What do you think of this trend? Is it a microcosm of our current healthcare system? Do you know of other tools that can help organizations trying to handle MACRA reporting?

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.