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Are Devices Distracting Doctors the Same As Devices Distracting Children?

Posted on August 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I came across this tweet from Howard Green, MD that really made me stop to think.

I like the juxtaposition of his comment because it makes you stop and think about the decisions we’re making. Although, I think that Dr. Green takes it too far since no one ever asked doctors to stop interacting. In fact, the chorus I’ve heard is that doctors need to interact more with patients. That said, I get his point that the EMR can get in between the patient and doctor if you let it. And many have let it get in the way.

We can certainly talk about how EHR software could be more usable. We can talk about how the onerous regulations and things like meaningful use and MACRA have made documenting in an EHR a clickfest that provides little to no value to patients. We can talk about how EHR software isn’t connected to other EHR software and we’re living in this world of healthcare data silos. All of these are a pain and a problem for doctors and we should do better. What is unfair to say is that EHRs tell doctors to stop interacting.

It’s always amazing to me how the EHR gets all sorts of undeserved blame. I’ve seen plenty of doctors who use an EHR and still spend plenty of time interacting with their patients. In fact, people like Dr. James Legan have integrated their EHR use into their patient interaction and made their patient interaction better. Yes, the EHR can be a distraction, but it doesn’t have to be. The same way devices can ruin my children, but they don’t have to ruin them. It’s how you choose to use it.

Physician Burnout Chart

Posted on January 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been writing a lot about Physician burnout and Physician dissatisfaction lately. This chart and tweet that Rasu Shrestha, MD shared puts some data behind what we’re talking about:

Physician Burn Out

Why Wouldn’t Doctors Be Happy?

Posted on January 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Imagine someone comes to your job and tells you that if you didn’t start participating in a bunch of government programs then you’re going to get a 9% pay cut. Plus, those government programs add little value to the work you do and it’s going to cost you time and money to meet the government requirements. How would you feel?

To add on top of that, we’re going to create a new system for how you’re going to get paid too. In fact, it’s actually going to be two new systems. One that applies to the old system of payment (which has been declining for years) and a new one which isn’t well defined yet.

Also, to add to the fun, you’re going to have become a collection agency as well since your usual A/R is going to go up as your payment portfolio changes from large reliable payers to a wide variety of small, less reliable people.

I forgot to mention that in order to get access to these new government programs and avoid the penalties you’re going to have to likely use technology built in the 80’s. Yes, that means that it’s built before we even knew what the cloud or mobile was going to be and used advanced technologies like MUMPS.

In case you missed the connection, I’m describing the life of a doctor today. The 9% penalties have arrived. ICD-10 is upon us. ACOs and value based reimbursement is starting, but is not well defined yet. High deductible plans are shifting physician A/R from payers to patients. EHR software still generally doesn’t leverage technologies like the cloud and mobile devices.

All of this makes for the perfect storm. Is it any wonder physician dissatisfaction is at an all time high? It’s not to me. It seems like even CMS’ Andy Slavitt finally realized it with the announcement that meaningful use is dead and going to be replaced. It’s a good first step, but the devil is in the details. I hope he’s able to execute, but let’s not be surprised that so many doctors are unhappy about what’s happening to healthcare.