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Practice Management Changes During EHR Implementation

Posted on October 12, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

EHR vendor simplifyMD has a really interesting post up that looks at what happens with Practice Management software when purchasing an EHR. In the post, they look at the results from a survey done by AC Group of 1,447 practices from November 2011 to March 2012. Here are some of the most interesting findings:

86% of Large Practices Keep Their PM When Purchasing a New EHR

88% of Smaller Practices Replace Their PM When Purchasing a New EHR

81% of Smaller Practices Hurt Their Revenue Stream by Implementing a New PM

Only 4% of Large Practices Felt an Impact to Their Revenue Stream

It tells a really interesting story about the impact of replacing your practice management system during an EHR implementation. I’ve seen the difference in choices made by small practices versus large practices first hand.

This issue is a crazy one because in the time I’ve been writing about EMR software, I’ve seen it flip flop multiple times. When I first started blogging about EMR, everyone wanted to keep their practice management software and just integrate it with their new EMR. Then, it quickly became that everyone wanted an integrated Practice Management and EMR. The above survey results seem to indicate that many clinics should consider going back to the old model of keeping their existing PM.

Full Disclosure: simplifyMD is an advertiser on EMR and EHR, but they didn’t ask me to post about it. I just found the data interesting.

Top 5 Revenue Cycle Management Issues

Posted on September 27, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Like Jennifer, I’m going to be heading to AHIMA 2012 as well. She correctly identifies that ICD-10 is a major AHIMA topic and Upcoding is the topic de jour, but another topic which I think continues to sit under the radar at AHIMA is revenue cycle management.

In many ways this makes sense when you consider that the ICD-10 has such an influence on revenue. Upcoding is all about revenue. Even healthcare documentation is dominated by a discussion of its impact on revenue (Yes, we could discuss why this should be about patient care in a future post). While many don’t want to admit it, humans need to get paid to survive and they want to get paid as much as they can get. Last that I checked doctors were human.

What then are the challenges that doctors face with revenue cycle management (or revenue integrity which many like to call it)? Here’s a great list of RCM challenges as listed by Ruth Zwieg on LinkedIn:

1. Managing the revenue cycle of a practice starts with good Practice Management (PM) software; one that has an easy to use scheduling tool for the front desk and that can determine insurance eligibility before the patient arrives so that the practice can collect the correct co-pay and/or out-of-pocket expenses up front before seen by the physician. This increases A/R and saves time instead of spending resources collecting after the fact which is time consuming and expensive.

2. The PM software must be easy to integrate with their existing or new EMR so that the physician group can show meaningful use and get that incentive money. Many practices still think they have to get new Practice Management software when they start looking at EMRs and many EMR companies try to sway them this way so they can get the sale for their PM software and their EMR.

3. ICD-10 – Need I say more – you have written about this in detail. Some Practice Management systems have a coding assistant built in but most do not. Coding correctly determines payment.

4. Staff training is very important from the beginning of the revenue cycle (scheduling, verifying insurance) to managing the patient once he/she checks in to when the physician sees them to check out and billing/collecting. Just like every other business, time has to be managed and time is money, especially a physician’s time. The more efficient the staff and their use and understanding of the software, the more patients the physician can see.

5. Many hospitals have and still are purchasing physician practices because the physician either does not know the business side of running a practice or just wants to be on salary and get rid of the headaches. Billing for physician practices is different than hospital billing. Hospitals are realizing that their hospital staff may not be doing the best job of that. In addition, the hospitals are realizing that their hospital system’s EHR does not have the desired functionality that a physician group needs or worse, they have multiple physician practices all using different EMRs that the hospital now has to manage or integrate into one.

I find this list really interesting and does speak to many of the revenue challenges healthcare faces. If we could solve these five challenges we’d have done a lot of good for doctors.

Greenway Medical (GWAY) IPO Suggests Big Opportunities For EMR Vendors

Posted on February 2, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While there’s a number of  large, publicly-traded EMR vendors out there — General Electric (NASDAQ: GE) and Cerner (NASDAQ: CERN) immediately come to mind — to date we haven’t seen many mid-sized or small companies kick off an initial public offering. But one medium-sized EMR/practice management vendor has broken the mold.

Today, Greenway Medical Technologies (NASDAQ: GWAY) took the plunge , pulling in $67 million to fund its operations. While the company had hoped to raise $100 million, its take is nothing to sneeze at. Health IT is a tricky investment, even for pros like yourselves, readers, and institutional investors in particular are a conservative bunch. The fact that they’re spending on a risky business means a lot.

Greenway, whose EMR is bundled with practice management software, had one heck of a ride today, with its stock climbing 30 percent during its first day of trading. The company sold 6.7 million shares at prices below its expected $11 to $13 range, diluting its intake somewhat, but the stock closed at a promising $13 per share.

The Carrollton, Ga.-based vendor has certainly done well in recent times. According to insider Wall Street blog Seeking Alpha, Greenway revenues shot up 55 percent, to $25.7 million, during the last quarter of operations. Operating margins went from negative to a positive 2 percent, which is at least a start.  Its biggest cash generator during the quarter was licensing revenue, which climbed 49 percent.

What’s interesting about this IPO isn’t just the fact that it ended well for Greenway. After all, it did take in less than planned, and the Wall Street crowd justifiably wonders how it will fare in a mind-boggling competitive market.  But it’s worth asking whether Greenway did better because it bundles both an EMR and practice management tools. Did the fact that Greenway wasn’t relying solely on EMR revenue contribute to its growth and financial success?  It would be interesting to find out, as that might help predict whether the bundled model is especially popular with physicians.

As for those who’d seek to imitate Greenway, they may have a chance if they move soon. Seeking Alpha editors think HITECH will still pump enough money into the EMR market to make these companies a reasonable investment. And given how many doctors and hospitals are still struggling to put EMRs in place, I have to agree.  In fact, given that an amazing number of hospitals and medical practices junk their first EMR, there may be a whole second wave of opportunity within three to five years.

All told, if the market’s response to a smallish IPO is any indication, you can expect a bunch of other EMR players to follow in its footsteps.  I’m thinking it will be companies in the $100m to $200m range, as they’re small enough to need capital (much cheaper capital than banks offer these days!) and nimble enough to benefit from the cash influx. Stay tuned and in coming months, I’ll tell you which other EMR and HIT companies I’m betting will climb onto the launch pad.