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Randomized Controlled Trials and Longitudinal Analysis for Health Apps at Twine Health (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on February 18, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The previous section of this article described the efforts of Dr. John Moore of Twine Health to rigorously demonstrate the effectiveness of a digital health treatment platform. As Moore puts it, Twine Health sought out two of the most effective treatment programs in the country–both Harvard’s diabetes treatment and MGH’s hypertension treatment are much more effective than the standard care found around the country–and then used their most effective programs for the control group of patients. The control group used face-to-face visits, phone calls, and text messages to keep in touch with their coaches and discuss their care plans.

The CollaboRhythm treatment worked markedly better than these exemplary programs. In the diabetes trial, they achieved a 3.2% reduction in diabetic patients’ A1C levels over three months (the control group achieved 2.0%). In the hypertension trial, 100% of patients reached a controlled blood pressure of less than 140/90 and the average reduction in blood pressure was 26mmHg (the control group had an average 16mmHg reduction and fewer than one-third of the patients went down less than 140/90).

What clinical studies can and cannot ensure

I see a few limitations with these clinical studies:

  • The digital program being tested combines several different intervention, as described before: reminders, messaging, virtual interactions, reports, and so on. Experiments show that all these things work together. But one can’t help wondering: what if you took out some time-consuming interaction? Could the platform be just as successful? But testing all the options would lead to a combinatorial explosion of tests.

    It’s important that interventions by coaches started out daily but decreased over the course of the study as the patient became more familiar and comfortable with the behavior called for in the care plans. The decrease in support required from the human coach suggests that the benefits are sustainable, because the subjects are demonstrating they can do more and more for themselves.

  • Outcomes were measured over short time frames. This is a perennial problem with clinical studies, and was noted as a problem in the papers. The researchers will contact subjects in about a year to see whether the benefits found in the studies were sustained. Even one year, although a good period to watch to see whether people bounce back to old behaviors, isn’t long enough to really tell the course of chronic illness. On the other hand, so many other life events intrude over time that it’s unfair to blame one intervention for what happens after a year.

  • Despite the short time frame for outcomes, the studies took years to set up, complete, and publish. This is another property of research practice that adds to its costs and slows down the dissemination of best practices through the medical field. The time frames involved explain why the researchers’ original Media Lab app was used for studies, even though they are now running a company on a totally different platform built on the same principles.

  • These studies also harbor all the well-known questions of external validity faced by all studies on human subjects. What if the populations at these Boston hospitals are unrepresentative of other areas? What if an element of self-selection skewed the results?

Bonnie Feldman, DDS, MBA, who went from dentistry to Wall Street and then to consulting in digital health, comments, “Creating an evidence base requires a delicate balancing act, as you describe, when technology is changing rapidly. Right now, chronic disease, especially autoimmune disease is affecting more young adults than ever before. These patients are in desperate need of new tools to support their self-care efforts. Twine’s early studies validate these important advances.”

Later research at Twine Health

Dr. Moore and his colleagues took stock of the tech landscape since the development of CollaboRhythm–for instance, the iPhone and its imitators had come out in the meantime–and developed a whole new platform on the principles of CollaboRhythm. Twine Health, of which Moore is co-founder and CEO, offers a platform based on these principles to more than 1,000 patients. The company expects to expand this number ten-fold in 2016. In addition to diabetes and hypertension, Twine Health’s platform is used for a wide range of conditions, such as depression, cholesterol control, fitness, and diet.

With a large cohort of patients to draw on, Twine Health can do more of the “big data” analysis that’s popular in the health care field. They don’t sponsor randomized trials like the two studies cited early, but they can compare patients’ progress to what they were doing before using Twine Health, as well as to patients who don’t use Twine Health. Moore says that results are positive and lasting, and that costs for treatment drop one-half to two-thirds.

Clinical studies bring the best scientific methods we know to validating health care apps. They are being found among a small but growing number of app developers. We still don’t know what the relation will be between randomized trials and the longitudinal analysis currently conducted by Twine Health; both seem of vital importance and they will probably complement each other. This is the path that developers have to take if they are to make a difference in health care.

Randomized Controlled Trials and Longitudinal Analysis for Health Apps at Twine Health (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on February 17, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Walking into a restaurant or a bus is enough to see that any experience delivered through a mobile device is likely to have an enthusiastic uptake. In health care, the challenge is to find experiences that make a positive difference in people’s lives–and proving it.

Of course, science has a time-tested method for demonstrating the truth of a proposition: randomized tests. Reproducibility is a big problem, admittedly, and science has been shaken by the string of errors and outright frauds perpetrated in scientific journals. Still, knowledge advances bit by bit through this process, and the goal of every responsible app developer in the health care space is the blessing offered by a successful test.

Consumer apps versus clinical apps

Most of the 165,000 health apps will probably always be labeled “consumer” apps and be sold without the expense of testing. They occupy the same place in the health care field as the thousands of untested dietary supplements and stem cell injection therapies whose promise is purely anecdotal. Consumer anger over ill-considered claims have led to lawsuits against the Fitbit device manufacturer and Lumosity mental fitness app, leading to questions about the suitability of digital fitness apps for medical care plans.

The impenetrability of consumer apps to objective judgment comes through in a recent study from the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) that asked mHealth experts to review a number of apps. The authors found very little agreement about what makes a good app, thus suggesting that quality cannot be judged reliably, a theme in another recent article of mine. One might easily anticipate that subjective measures would produce wide variations in judgment. But in fact, many subjective measures produced more agreement (although not really strong agreement) than more “objective” measures such as effectiveness. If I am reading the data right, one of the measures found to be most unreliable was one of the most “objective”: whether an app has been tested for effectiveness.

Designing studies for these apps is an uncertain art. Sometimes a study may show that you don’t know what to measure or aren’t running the study long enough. These possible explanations–gentler than the obvious concern that maybe fitness devices don’t achieve their goals–swirl about the failure of the Scripps “Wired for Health” study.

The Twine Health randomized controlled trials

I won’t talk any more about consumer apps here, though–instead I’ll concentrate on apps meant for serious clinical use. What can randomized testing do for these?

Twine Health and MIT’s Media Lab took the leap into rigorous testing with two leading Boston-area partners in the health care field: a diabetes case study with the Joslin Diabetes Center and a hypertension case study with Massachusetts General Hospital. Both studies compared a digital platform for monitoring and guiding patients with pre-existing tools such as face-to-face visits and email. Both demonstrated better results through the digital platform–but certain built-in limitations of randomized studies leave open questions.

When Dr. John Moore decided to switch fields and concentrate on the user experience, he obtained a PhD at the Media Lab and helped develop an app called CollaboRhythm. He then used it for the two studies described in the papers, while founding and becoming CEO of Twine Health. CollaboRhythm is a pretty comprehensive platform, offering:

  • The ability to store a care plan and make it clear to the user through visualizations.

  • Patient self-tracking to report taking medications and resulting changes in vital signs, such as glycemic levels.

  • Visualizations showing the patient her medication adherence.

  • Reminders when to take medication and do other aspects of treatment, such as checking blood pressure.

  • Inferences about diet and exercise patterns based on reported data, shown to the patient.

  • Support from a human coach through secure text messages and virtual visits using audio, video, and shared screen control.

  • Decision support based on reported vital statistics and behaviors. For instance, when diabetic patients reported following their regimen but their glycemic levels were getting out of control, the app could suggest medication changes to the care team.

The collection of tools is not haphazard, but closely follows the modern model of digital health laid out by the head of Partners Connected Health, Joseph Kvedar, in his book The Internet of Healthy Things (which I reviewed at length). As in Kvedar’s model, the CollaboRhythm interventions rested on convenient digital technologies, put patients’ care into their own hands, and offered positive encouragement backed up by clinical staff.

As an example of the patient empowerment, the app designers deliberately chose not to send the patient an alarm if she forgets her medication. Instead, the patient is expected to learn and adopt responsibility over time by seeing the results of her actions in the visualizations. In exit interviews, some patients expressed appreciation for being asked to take responsibility for their own health.

The papers talk of situated learning, a classic education philosophy that teaches behavior in the context where the person has to practice the behavior, instead of an artificial classroom or lab setting. Technology can bring learning into the home, making it stick.

There is also some complex talk of the relative costs and time commitments between the digital interventions and the traditional ones. One important finding is that app users expressed significantly better feelings about the digital intervention. They became more conscious of their health and appreciated being able to be part of decisions such as changing insulin levels.

So how well does this treatment work? I’ll explore that tomorrow in the next section of this article, along with strengths and weaknesses of the studies.

Significant Articles in the Health IT Community in 2015

Posted on December 15, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Have you kept current with changes in device connectivity, Meaningful Use, analytics in healthcare, and other health IT topics during 2015? Here are some of the articles I find significant that came out over the past year.

The year kicked off with an ominous poll about Stage 2 Meaningful Use, with implications that came to a head later with the release of Stage 3 requirements. Out of 1800 physicians polled around the beginning of the year, more than half were throwing in the towel–they were not even going to try to qualify for Stage 2 payments. Negotiations over Stage 3 of Meaningful Use were intense and fierce. A January 2015 letter from medical associations to ONC asked for more certainty around testing and certification, and mentioned the need for better data exchange (which the health field likes to call interoperability) in the C-CDA, the most popular document exchange format.

A number of expert panels asked ONC to cut back on some requirements, including public health measures and patient view-download-transmit. One major industry group asked for a delay of Stage 3 till 2019, essentially tolerating a lack of communication among EHRs. The final rules, absurdly described as a simplification, backed down on nothing from patient data access to quality measure reporting. Beth Israel CIO John Halamka–who has shuttled back and forth between his Massachusetts home and Washington, DC to advise ONC on how to achieve health IT reform–took aim at Meaningful Use and several other federal initiatives.

Another harbinger of emerging issues in health IT came in January with a speech about privacy risks in connected devices by the head of the Federal Trade Commission (not an organization we hear from often in the health IT space). The FTC is concerned about the security of recent trends in what industry analysts like to call the Internet of Things, and medical devices rank high in these risks. The speech was a lead-up to a major report issued by the FTC on protecting devices in the Internet of Things. Articles in WIRED and Bloomberg described serious security flaws. In August, John Halamka wrote own warning about medical devices, which have not yet started taking security really seriously. Smart watches are just as vulnerable as other devices.

Because so much medical innovation is happening in fast-moving software, and low-budget developers are hankering for quick and cheap ways to release their applications, in February, the FDA started to chip away at its bureaucratic gamut by releasing guidelines releasing developers from FDA regulation medical apps without impacts on treatment and apps used just to transfer data or do similarly non-transformative operations. They also released a rule for unique IDs on medical devices, a long-overdue measure that helps hospitals and researchers integrate devices into monitoring systems. Without clear and unambiguous IDs, one cannot trace which safety problems are associated with which devices. Other forms of automation may also now become possible. In September, the FDA announced a public advisory committee on devices.

Another FDA decision with a potential long-range impact was allowing 23andMe to market its genetic testing to consumers.

The Department of Health and Human Services has taken on exceedingly ambitious goals during 2015. In addition to the daunting Stage 3 of Meaningful Use, they announced a substantial increase in the use of fee-for-value, although they would still leave half of providers on the old system of doling out individual payments for individual procedures. In December, National Coordinator Karen DeSalvo announced that Health Information Exchanges (which limit themselves only to a small geographic area, or sometimes one state) would be able to exchange data throughout the country within one year. Observers immediately pointed out that the state of interoperability is not ready for this transition (and they could well have added the need for better analytics as well). HHS’s five-year plan includes the use of patient-generated and non-clinical data.

The poor state of interoperability was highlighted in an article about fees charged by EHR vendors just for setting up a connection and for each data transfer.

In the perennial search for why doctors are not exchanging patient information, attention has turned to rumors of deliberate information blocking. It’s a difficult accusation to pin down. Is information blocked by health care providers or by vendors? Does charging a fee, refusing to support a particular form of information exchange, or using a unique data format constitute information blocking? On the positive side, unnecessary imaging procedures can be reduced through information exchange.

Accountable Care Organizations are also having trouble, both because they are information-poor and because the CMS version of fee-for-value is too timid, along with other financial blows and perhaps an inability to retain patients. An August article analyzed the positives and negatives in a CMS announcement. On a large scale, fee-for-value may work. But a key component of improvement in chronic conditions is behavioral health which EHRs are also unsuited for.

Pricing and consumer choice have become a major battleground in the current health insurance business. The steep rise in health insurance deductibles and copays has been justified (somewhat retroactively) by claiming that patients should have more responsibility to control health care costs. But the reality of health care shopping points in the other direction. A report card on state price transparency laws found the situation “bleak.” Another article shows that efforts to list prices are hampered by interoperability and other problems. One personal account of a billing disaster shows the state of price transparency today, and may be dangerous to read because it could trigger traumatic memories of your own interactions with health providers and insurers. Narrow and confusing insurance networks as well as fragmented delivery of services hamper doctor shopping. You may go to a doctor who your insurance plan assures you is in their network, only to be charged outrageous out-of-network costs. Tools are often out of date overly simplistic.

In regard to the quality ratings that are supposed to allow intelligent choices to patients, A study found that four hospital rating sites have very different ratings for the same hospitals. The criteria used to rate them is inconsistent. Quality measures provided by government databases are marred by incorrect data. The American Medical Association, always disturbed by public ratings of doctors for obvious reasons, recently complained of incorrect numbers from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. In July, the ProPublica site offered a search service called the Surgeon Scorecard. One article summarized the many positive and negative reactions. The New England Journal of Medicine has called ratings of surgeons unreliable.

2015 was the year of the intensely watched Department of Defense upgrade to its health care system. One long article offered an in-depth examination of DoD options and their implications for the evolution of health care. Another article promoted the advantages of open-source VistA, an argument that was not persuasive enough for the DoD. Still, openness was one of the criteria sought by the DoD.

The remote delivery of information, monitoring, and treatment (which goes by the quaint term “telemedicine”) has been the subject of much discussion. Those concerned with this development can follow the links in a summary article to see the various positions of major industry players. One advocate of patient empowerment interviewed doctors to find that, contrary to common fears, they can offer email access to patients without becoming overwhelmed. In fact, they think it leads to better outcomes. (However, it still isn’t reimbursed.)

Laws permitting reimbursement for telemedicine continued to spread among the states. But a major battle shaped up around a ruling in Texas that doctors have a pre-existing face-to-face meeting with any patient whom they want to treat remotely. The spread of telemedicine depends also on reform of state licensing laws to permit practices across state lines.

Much wailing and tears welled up over the required transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10. The AMA, with some good arguments, suggested just waiting for ICD-11. But the transition cost much less than anticipated, making ICD-10 much less of a hot button, although it may be harmful to diagnosis.

Formal studies of EHR strengths and weaknesses are rare, so I’ll mention this survey finding that EHRs aid with public health but are ungainly for the sophisticated uses required for long-term, accountable patient care. Meanwhile, half of hospitals surveyed are unhappy with their EHRs’ usability and functionality and doctors are increasingly frustrated with EHRs. Nurses complained about technologies’s time demands and the eternal lack of interoperability. A HIMSS survey turned up somewhat more postive feelings.

EHRs are also expensive enough to hurt hospital balance sheets and force them to forgo other important expenditures.

Electronic health records also took a hit from ONC’s Sentinel Events program. To err, it seems, is not only human but now computer-aided. A Sentinel Event Alert indicated that more errors in health IT products should be reported, claiming that many go unreported because patient harm was avoided. The FDA started checking self-reported problems on PatientsLikeMe for adverse drug events.

The ONC reported gains in patient ability to view, download, and transmit their health information online, but found patient portals still limited. Although one article praised patient portals by Epic, Allscripts, and NextGen, an overview of studies found that patient portals are disappointing, partly because elderly patients have trouble with them. A literature review highlighted where patient portals fall short. In contrast, giving patients full access to doctors’ notes increases compliance and reduces errors. HHS’s Office of Civil Rights released rules underlining patients’ rights to access their data.

While we’re wallowing in downers, review a study questioning the value of patient-centered medical homes.

Reuters published a warning about employee wellness programs, which are nowhere near as fair or accurate as they claim to be. They are turning into just another expression of unequal power between employer and employee, with tendencies to punish sick people.

An interesting article questioned the industry narrative about the medical device tax in the Affordable Care Act, saying that the industry is expanding robustly in the face of the tax. However, this tax is still a hot political issue.

Does anyone remember that Republican congressmen published an alternative health care reform plan to replace the ACA? An analysis finds both good and bad points in its approach to mandates, malpractice, and insurance coverage.

Early reports on use of Apple’s open ResearchKit suggested problems with selection bias and diversity.

An in-depth look at the use of devices to enhance mental activity examined where they might be useful or harmful.

A major genetic data mining effort by pharma companies and Britain’s National Health Service was announced. The FDA announced a site called precisionFDA for sharing resources related to genetic testing. A recent site invites people to upload health and fitness data to support research.

As data becomes more liquid and is collected by more entities, patient privacy suffers. An analysis of web sites turned up shocking practices in , even at supposedly reputable sites like WebMD. Lax security in health care networks was addressed in a Forbes article.

Of minor interest to health IT workers, but eagerly awaited by doctors, was Congress’s “doc fix” to Medicare’s sustainable growth rate formula. The bill did contain additional clauses that were called significant by a number of observers, including former National Coordinator Farzad Mostashari no less, for opening up new initiatives in interoperability, telehealth, patient monitoring, and especially fee-for-value.

Connected health took a step forward when CMS issued reimbursement guidelines for patient monitoring in the community.

A wonky but important dispute concerned whether self-insured employers should be required to report public health measures, because public health by definition needs to draw information from as wide a population as possible.

Data breaches always make lurid news, sometimes under surprising circumstances, and not always caused by health care providers. The 2015 security news was dominated by a massive breach at the Anthem health insurer.

Along with great fanfare in Scientific American for “precision medicine,” another Scientific American article covered its privacy risks.

A blog posting promoted early and intensive interactions with end users during app design.

A study found that HIT implementations hamper clinicians, but could not identify the reasons.

Natural language processing was praised for its potential for simplifying data entry, and to discover useful side effects and treatment issues.

CVS’s refusal to stock tobacco products was called “a major sea-change for public health” and part of a general trend of pharmacies toward whole care of the patient.

A long interview with FHIR leader Grahame Grieve described the progress of the project, and its the need for clinicians to take data exchange seriously. A quiet milestone was reached in October with a a production version from Cerner.

Given the frequent invocation of Uber (even more than the Cheesecake Factory) as a model for health IT innovation, it’s worth seeing the reasons that model is inapplicable.

A number of hot new sensors and devices were announced, including a tiny sensor from Intel, a device from Google to measure blood sugar and another for multiple vital signs, enhancements to Microsoft products, a temperature monitor for babies, a headset for detecting epilepsy, cheap cameras from New Zealand and MIT for doing retinal scans, a smart phone app for recognizing respiratory illnesses, a smart-phone connected device for detecting brain injuries and one for detecting cancer, a sleep-tracking ring, bed sensors, ultrasound-guided needle placement, a device for detecting pneumonia, and a pill that can track heartbeats.

The medical field isn’t making extensive use yet of data collection and analysis–or uses analytics for financial gain rather than patient care–the potential is demonstrated by many isolated success stories, including one from Johns Hopkins study using 25 patient measures to study sepsis and another from an Ontario hospital. In an intriguing peek at our possible future, IBM Watson has started to integrate patient data with its base of clinical research studies.

Frustrated enough with 2015? To end on an upbeat note, envision a future made bright by predictive analytics.

Driving Towards Quality Outcomes

Posted on September 9, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most compelling talks at the Healthcare Forum was from Jennifer Brull, MD Physician Owner and CEO at Prairie Star Family Practice.  Dr. Brull practices in a small town of 1900 souls in Kansas and so she provided a unique perspective on quality outcomes in healthcare.  As Dr. Brull said, “Quality improvement for me is some about my ego and making sure that I’m a good doctor, but a lot about taking care of my friends who also happen to be my patients.”  However, the methods Dr. Brull used to improve outcomes can be applied to any size practice.

In fact, Dr. Brull uses the national Meaningful Use Outcome Priorities as a framework for her practice:

  • Improve quality, safety, efficiency, and reduce health disparities
  • Engage patients and families in their healthcare
  • Improve care coordination
  • Ensure adequate privacy and security protections for personal health information
  • Improve population and public health

Dr. Brull noted that improving quality was first on her list because of its importance, but acknowledged how difficult it can be to measure.  We love to talk about big data and small data in healthcare, but sometimes there is no data.  As EHR use increases, the data captured provides valuable insight into opportunities to improve the care process.    If the data doesn’t match the provider’s perception of the care being provider, it can be scary.  Lots of times doctors get put on a pedestal, but Dr. Brull humbly shared how she fell off her pedestal and how awakening to the fact that she could benefit from the data in her EHRhelped save the lives of her patients.

One of the barriers to improving quality outcomes is convincing other members of the staff to participate.  Most people equate quality outcomes with more time per patient, which then translates to seeing fewer patients or more hours working.  Neither option is tenable long term.  Dr. Brull offered a much better alternative, “By making the right thing to do easy, you actually get more time to do quality improvement and you become more efficient in your processes.”

“If you measure it, you will improve it!” is Dr. Brull’s simple approach to quality improvement.  However, seeing the data before you will often illicit the reaction that “This data is not right!”  Dr. Brull has learned a simple lesson: “Trust your data, it’s probably right.”  Plus, measuring the data and graphing it will let you know if you are improving or not.  She shared, “Graphs help point out critical flaws.  They help motivate your staff.  They help direct your quality improvement cycles.  They show the effect of change over time.”

Dr. Brull offered a number of methods she used to improve the quality outcomes in her office.  The first is education.  She noted, “We don’t hide our poor performance results.  We talk about them.”  This education on the clinic’s performance can be a great motivator to improve.  Alerts in the EHR also proved effective.  Dr. Brull tried sending letters to patients, but found they were “A high dollar investment for a low dollar return.”

When trying to improve breast cancer screening, they found that sending a mammogram order directly to radiology proved effective at getting more patients screened.  The nurses prompted the doctor to screen for colon cancer by simply placing the Hemoccult kit on the counter.  Just by streamlining the referral process they often saw better results.  For example, Dr. Brull developed a patient information handout which the nurses gave patients before they were seen by the doctor.  This dramatically decreased the amount of time the doctor had to spend educating patients on why they should be screened.  These simple changes made doing the right thing easy.

One of Dr. Brull’s lessons learned was to “Never take your eyes off the data, because when you do you start to slip and sometimes you slip really big.”  The ultimate goal of EHR adoption is to improve the quality of care.  Most clinicians would be shocked to learn how they are performing on some of the standard quality measures.  Those who have the courage to use data to drive improvement will create the future of care.

Dr. Brull closed her remarks saying, “My enthusiasm around quality improvement has a lot to do with seeing those graphs.  My passion about quality improvement is because of Marilyn [a patient whose life was saved] and because of all the patients that I know every time I improve the care I take of them I make them live longer and healthier lives.”

I recommend watching the full Dr. Brull Healthcare Forum presentation (embedded below) to see and hear firsthand how she improved the quality outcomes in her clinic:

The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, sponsored this coverage of the Healthcare Forum in order to share the messages from the forum with a wider audience.  You can view all of the Healthcare Forum videos on The Healthcare Forum website.

ONC Tiger Teams Working on Meaningful Use Stage 1 and 2

Posted on December 23, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I saw this a little late (which to me says something about the legislative process), but today’s the last day to provide feedback to the HIT Policy Committee’s Quality Measure Workgroup for Stage 2 and Stage 3 meaningful use. Here’s some information about it from this Health Care IT News article.

The tiger teams have already proposed measure concepts for each of the domain areas, Lansky said. After reviewing the teams’ recommendations, the workgroup revised and consolidated the measure concepts and now requests public comment on the proposed concepts.

Lansky said the workgroup is requesting general comments and specific examples of measures for each measure concept that fit the following criteria:

  • HIT-sensitive – Capable of being built into electronic health record (EHR) systems with implementation of relevant health IT functions (e.g., clinical decision support) that result in improved outcomes and/or clinical performance
  • Parsimonious – Applies across multiple types of providers, care settings and conditions
  • Demonstrates preventable burden – Supports potential improvements in population health and reduces burden of illness
  • Assesses health risk status and outcomes – Supports assessment of patient health risks that can be used for risk adjusting other measures, and assessing changes in outcomes, including general cross-cutting measures of risk status and functional status and condition-specific measures
  • Longitudinal – Enables assessment of longitudinal, condition-specific, patient-focused episodes of care

Comments to the workgroup can be submitted online here.

Meaningful Use Rule Clarification by John Halamka

Posted on July 28, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In MedCity News, John Halamka makes an effort to summarize as simply as possible the Quality Measures:

I’ve been asked to summarize the Quality Measures as simply as possible

a. The Core Measures for All Eligible Professionals, Medicare and Medicaid are in the Final Rule Table 7, page 287. The Measures are

  • Hypertension: Blood Pressure Measurement
  • Tobacco Use Assessment and Tobacco Cessation Intervention
  • Adult Weight Screening and Follow-up

b. If the denominator for one or more of the Core Measures is zero, EPs will be required to report results for up to three Alternate Core Measures. The Alternate Core Measures for Eligible Professionals are in the Final Rule Table 7, page 287. The Measures are

  • Weight Assessment and Counseling for Children and Adolescents
  • Preventive Care and Screening: Influenza Immunization for Patients ? 50 Years Old
  • Childhood Immunization Status

c. The Clinical Quality Measures for Submission by Medicare or Medicaid EPs for the 2011 and 2012 Payment Year (EPs must choose 3) are in the Final Rule Table 6, page 272 . Here’s a summary of the 44 quality measures that CMS posted last week.

d. The Clinical Quality Measures for Submission by Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals for Payment Year 2011-2012 are in the Final Rule Table 10, page 303. The Measures are

  • Emergency Department Throughput ’ admitted patients Median time from ED arrival to ED departure for admitted patients
  • Emergency Department Throughput ’ admitted patients Admission decision time to ED departure time for admitted patients
  • Ischemic stroke ’ Discharge on anti-thrombotics
  • Ischemic stroke ’ Anticoagulation for A-fib/flutter
  • Ischemic stroke ’ Thrombolytic therapy for patients arriving within 2 hours of symptom onset
  • Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke ’ Antithrombotic therapy by day 2
  • Ischemic stroke ’ Discharge on statins
  • Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke ’ Stroke education
  • Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke ’ Rehabilitation assessment
  • VTE prophylaxis within 24 hours of arrival
  • Intensive Care Unit VTE prophylaxis
  • Anticoagulation overlap therapy
  • Platelet monitoring on unfractionated heparin
  • VTE discharge instructions
  • Incidence of potentially preventable VTE

Everything clear now?