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Publicly Traded Health IT Companies

Posted on August 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I keep forgetting how good of a resource Quora is. For those not familiar with Quora, it’s a Q&A platform. If you have a question, you can get answers from the community of users. While asking questions is interesting, it’s also fun to just browse other people’s questions and answers. In some ways it’s an active and opinionated Wikipedia.

Here’s a good example. Someone asked about Healthcare IT companies or digital health companies that are publicly traded and here’s the list they generated:

  • Allscripts (NASDAQ: MDRX) builds electronic health records and practice management solftware
  • athenahealth (NASDAQ: ATHN) provides cloud-based billing and clinical software to medical group practices
  • Benefitfocus (NASDAQ: BNFT)
  • Careview Communications (OTCBB: CRVW) high speed data network system deployed in a healthcare facilities using existing cable television infrastructure.
  • Cerner (NASDAQ: CERN) develops EMR software to support clinical practice in hospitals, worksite clinics, physician practices and pharmacies
  • Computer Programs and Systems (NASDAQ: CPSI) Develops an EMR system specifically for rural, community and critical access hospitals
  • Epocrates (NASDAQ:EPOC) is a mobile health app publisher for medical professionals
  • Greenway Medical (NYSE: GWAY) builds electronic health records and practice management solftware
  • HealthStream (NASDAQ: HSTM) develops a learning management system for healthcare providers
  • iCAD (NASDAQ: ICAD) CAD solutions for digital and film-based mammography systems
  • MedAssets (NASDAQ: MDAS) provides cloud-based software for clinical spend management and revenue cycle management
  • Medidata Solutions (NASDAQ: MDSO) provides a cloud-based clinical trial data management solution
  • Merge Healthcare (NASDAQ: MRGE) builds “enterprise imaging” software company
  • Omnicell (NASDAQ: OMCL) automated solutions for hospital medication and supply management
  • Quality Systems (NASDAQ: QSII) develops practice management and EHR solutions as well as HIEs for medical and dental group practices and hospitals
  • Simulations Plus (NASDAQ: SLP) simulation software for use in the pharmaceutical research and in the education of pharmacy and medical students
  • Streamline Health Solutions (NASDAQ: STRM) workflow and document management technology solutions for hospitals and physician groups
  • Vocera (NASDAQ: VCRA)  wearable voice-controlled communication badge and software platform for hospitals
  • WebMD (NASDAQ: WBMD) provides health information services for consumers and healthcare professionals through its public/private portals

Pretty interesting to look through the list. Of course, it doesn’t include publicly traded companies that have a big footprint in healthcare, but do a lot of other things as well (GE, Siemens, Dell, CDW, Canon, etc etc etc).

When I saw the list of publicly traded health IT companies I wondered if something cool could be done to track these companies. I’ve noticed that HIStalk has been following the publicly traded companies a lot closer lately. A lot can be learned about the healthcare IT market by following these companies.

How many of you use Quora on a regular basis? Do you just consume content or do you ask and answer questions too?

Getting Your EMR’s UI/UX RIght

Posted on June 4, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A couple of weeks ago, someone posted an interesting question on the buzzing question and answer site Quora.com: Is there room for any more new EMRs in the insanely crowded marketplace we have today? According to one very sharp medical student who’s keeping an eye on the field, the best response isn’t “yes,” or “no,” but “you’ve got the wrong question.”

His answer, which I’d like to share with you, argues that there’s no point whatsoever trying to introduce a new EMR with a shiny new feature set when none of the existing field have a decent UI/UX right now. Jae Won Joh then lays out the steps he believes vendors should take if they want to get the basic UI/UX right (steps excerpted for brevity):

Step 0: Architect the patient data structure carefully
I mention this because you’re going to need to be able to pass this patient data around for clinical use, billing, research, auditing, etc, so design for flexibility and expandability from the get-go. Too many EMRs make it painfully obvious that things were thrown in as afterthoughts.

Step 1: Decide on your market…
…because you need to do everything possible to totally kill it. It’s the only way to go. If you’re going to take on group practices, great, take on group practices. If you’re going to work the hospital scene, fine, work the hospital scene. Stop trying to make something that does everything everywhere. This is not a feature, it’s a horrible bug.

Step 2: Analyze what your market does
If it’s a hospital, you need multiple classes of user, ranging all the way from student to nurse to physician to administrator. You’ll also want a competent notification system, because inpatient things tend to be more urgent and if the ICU patient’s potassium is critically high, you probably want to warn the physician immediately instead of waiting for the physician to check on it manually, because gee, the patient might code and die before that happens….The concerns are different for an outpatient scenario: you don’t need a lot of the stuff that hospitals require in an office. Less orders, more scripts, greater throughput in terms of number of patients, scheduling functionality, etc.

Step 3a: Abstract workflows to a very high level first
In other words, they are as follows: 
1) read data
2) interpret data
3) input data

There’s really not much else to it. Every workflow is a permutation of those three. For example: a physician orders a lab, and it’s performed. The result is read by the tech who provides the input to the system, where it is then read and interpreted by the physician so they can go from there. Figure out how each workflow revolves around these three abstractions.

<excerpted>

Step 3c: Design for a 5-year-old
If a five-year old couldn’t use your UI, you screwed up. Period.

There’s a lot more to Joh’s answer, and I suggest you hit Quora youself and read his entire piece. When it comes to usability, most EMRs have barely scratched the surface, and talking about these issues more is always a Good Thing.

Healthcare Social Media Explained in Pee

Posted on March 17, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I usually don’t like to do two funny posts in a row (see the Meaningful Use Rap that Katherine posted), but I couldn’t resist. When I saw this it was too funny. I also considered whether it was ok for a very serious blog like EMR and EHR to post about Pee. Although, I figured this is healthcare where most are more familiar with pee than the rest of the world. Even though I’ll never forget the labor nurse with my first child calling it “she she.” We still call it that in our home.

Regardless, if you’re looking for a way to explain all the various social media platforms, here’s an interesting way to look at it (Source: vanished-omen):