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A 2 Prong Strategy for Healthcare Security – Going Beyond Compliance

Posted on November 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

As if our security senses weren’t on heightened alert enough, I think all of us were hit by the recent distributed denial of service attacks that took down a number of major sites on the internet. The unique part of this attack was that it used a “botnet” of internet of things (IoT) devices. It’s amazing how creative these security attacks have become and healthcare is often the target.

The problem for healthcare is that too many organizations have spent their time and money on compliance versus security. Certainly, compliance is important (HIPAA Audits are real and expensive if you fail), but just because you’re compliant doesn’t mean you’re secure. Healthcare organizations need to move beyond compliance and make efforts to make their organizations more secure.

Here’s a 2 prong strategy that organizations should consider when it comes to securing their organization’s data and technology:

Build Enough Barriers
The first piece of every healthcare organization’s security strategy should be to ensure that you’ve created enough barriers to protect your organization’s health data. While we’ve seen an increase in targeted hacks, the most common attacks on healthcare organizations are still the hacker who randomly finds a weakness in your technology infrastructure. Once they find that weakness, they exploit it and are able to do all the damage.

The reality is that you’ll never make your health IT 100% secure. That’s impossible. However, if you create enough barriers to entry, you’ll keep out the majority of hackers that are just scouring the internet for opportunities. Building the right barriers to entry means that most hackers will move on to a more vulnerable target and leave you alone. Some of these barriers might be a high quality firewall, AI security, integrated mobile device security, user training, encryption (device and in transit), and much more.

Building these barriers has to be ingrained into your culture. You can’t just change to a secure organization overnight. It needs to be deeply embedded into everything you do as a company and all the decisions you make.

Create a Mitigation and Response Strategy
While we’d like to dream that a breach will never occur to us, hacks are becoming more a question of when and not if they will happen. This is why it’s absolutely essential that healthcare organizations create a proper mitigation and response strategy.

I recently heard about a piece of ransomware that hit a healthcare organization. In the 60 seconds from when the ransomware hit the organization, 6 devices were infected before they could mitigate any further spread. That’s incredible. Imagine if they didn’t have a mitigation strategy in place. The ransomware would have spread like wildfire across the organization. Do you have a mitigation strategy that will identify breaches so you can stop them before they spread?

Creating an appropriate response to breaches, infections, and hacks is also just as important. While no incident of this nature is fun, it is much better to be ahead of the incident versus learning about it when the news story, patient, or government organization comes to you with the information. Make sure you have a well thought out strategy on how you’ll handle a breach. They’re quickly becoming a reality for every organization.

As healthcare moves beyond compliance and focuses more on security, we’ll be much better positioned to protect patients’ data. Not only is this the right thing to do for our patients, it’s also the right thing to do for our businesses. Creating a good security plan which prevents incidents and then backing that up with a mitigation and response strategy are both great steps to ensuring your organization is prepared.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

The Waiting Room – A Patient’s First Impression

Posted on September 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We’ve all heard about the importance of first impressions. They last a long time and happen very quickly. The same is true for a medical practice. Patients’ first impression of a medical practice is the waiting room and that impression can last a very long time. What have you done to improve your patients’ experience in the waiting room?

Instead of doing a bunch of small things in your waiting room, I suggest you focus on creating one specific WOW! factor that patients will remember. In many cases people are turning to digital signage to provide this wow factor. Combine amazing content with some amazing digital signage like a curved TV, 3D TV, or massive screen and you can quickly implement the WOW! factor in your waiting room.

These type of memorable experiences for patients in your waiting room are the fuel that feeds social media and physician rating services today. If you want patients to share their experience at your office on social media or rate you highly on the various physician rating websites, start by WOWing them in your waiting room. Almost all of your patients now arrive with a phone in their pocket which they can use while they wait to provide your practice a quality rating. Leverage that as an asset.

I’ve heard some people argue that digital signage isn’t valuable anymore in the exam room because patients all show up with their own smartphones and tablets. They argue that patients have their heads buried in their phones and so they never see the digital signage you put in the exam room. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

The reality is that most of us with smartphones have become quite habituated to what people call the second screen experience. More and more people are watching TV while playing on their smartphone. It’s normal for us to be processing what’s on a TV while keeping an eye on our smartphone at the same time. The same thing happens in the waiting room when you provide a compelling digital experience. We consume both the TV and our smartphone.

Leveraging a high-quality digital experience in your waiting room provides a better patient experience overall. What’s the worst part of a waiting room? You have to wait. What’s the solution? We all have experienced a long flight or car ride that felt like it was much shorter thanks to some sort of digital media experience. This same experience can be had by patients if you invest in the right digital signage and content. Shorter wait times lead to better physician ratings in ambulatory practices and better HCAHPS scores in hospitals.

How have you approached your waiting room? Is there something unique or interesting you’ve done that’s made the patient experience better? What kind of first impression are you making on your patients?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Smartphone Strategy May Cause Health Data Interoperability Problems

Posted on July 13, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Tonight I was out at my local electronics store looking over the latest in Samsung gear. While chatting with the salesman behind the Samsung counter, I picked up a wireless charging pad and asked what it cost. “Don’t bother,” he said. “That won’t work with your phone,” which happens to be a none-too-old Galaxy Note Edge.

New batteries? Same problem. I strongly suspect that the lovely VR gear, headset and smart watch on display suffer from the same limitations. And heaven knows that these devices wouldn’t work with products produced by other Android-compatible manufacturers.

Now, I am no communications industry expert. So I won’t hold forth on whether Samsung’s decision to create a network of proprietary devices is a smart strategy or not. Intuitively, my guess is that the giant manufacturer is making a mistake in trying to lock in customers this way, but I don’t have data upon which to base that claim.

But when it comes to health IT, it’s clearer to me how things might play out. And I’d argue that Samsung’s emerging strategy should generate concern among providers.

Interconnecting proprietary tech is far from new. In fact, Apple long ago won the battle to force its users onto its proprietary platform, and AFAIK, the computing and media giant has never back down from the stance, including where its telecommunications gear was concerned. But at least until recently, we’ve had interoperable Android phones and tablets to work with, which ran on a freely-available operating system that played nicely with other devices running the system.

But with the device maker moving away from “works on Android” to “works on Samsung Android devices,” the chain of interoperability is broken. This could lead to shifts in the telecommunications industry which don’t bode well for healthcare users.

On the surface, we are only looking at relatively petty IT concerns for HIT leaders, such as seeing to it that the Samsung user gets a Samsung charging pad. Like enterprises in other industries, health leaders will adapt to this inconvenience. But the problems don’t stop there.

If telecommunications manufacturers follow Samsung’s lead, and decide to add proprietary quirks to their devices, providers may pay the price. Depending on how these newly-proprietary devices are configured, and how they must be supported, it could become much harder to dig data out of them on an ongoing basis. That’s the last thing we need right now.

Not only that, what happens if proprietary differences between Android phones and tablets make it harder for them to communicate with medical devices, a tantalizing possibility which is just beginning to present itself? While we don’t yet know how devices such as infusion pumps to interoperate with mobile devices, nor the latter two with desktops, wearables and servers, we don’t want to close off options.

Bottom line, I may be crying wolf too soon, but these developments alarm me. I’d hate to see additional walls go up between various data sources, particularly before we even know what we can do with them.

Sometimes Health Is About A Simple Connection to the Right People

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

One of our biggest health care costs comes from our aging population. No doubt they’re a challenging group that often has multiple chronic conditions and is generally seen as anti-technology. While their medical conditions can be a challenge, it’s unfair to say that technology can’t have a great impact for good on even senior citizens.

In fact, one of the biggest health challenges senior citizens face is loneliness. It’s amazing the health impact being lonely can have on a person. The great thing is that technology as simple as a tablet can have a dramatic impact for good on senior citizens. Here’s a great video from Samsung and Breezie that illustrates this point:

I’ve seen a number of solutions like the Breezie tablets that have made the internet extremely accessible for senior citizens. It’s extraordinary to watch the impact for good that connecting to their friends and family on a tablet can have on a person. Plus, once their emotional state is in a better place, it’s often much easier for them to deal with their physical health challenges as well.

The amazing part is that these tablets don’t need some sort of complex health apps. They don’t need an AI generated dog to be their friend (Although, people are working on this). They don’t need dozens of healthcare sensors that are constantly monitoring their every health stat (Although, people are working on this too). All these seniors need is simple apps like Facebook where they can see pictures of their grandkids and email where they can communicate with their family and friends.

I’m sure that as things progress we’ll see more and more advanced health apps on these tablets. Many seniors have a challenge traveling to see their doctor, so you can easily see how a telemedicine app would be very convenient for both patient and doctor. Plus, sometimes you don’t even need video, but just a personal message from your trusted caregiver to help a patient feel better. All of this will come to the tablets, but we can start with something much simpler. A basic connection to the right people for that person.

I heard of one project where the patient improvement came as much from the daily call these lonely, elderly patients received as it was the actual study that was being conducted. While we could throw more people at the problem, that only scales so far. If we really want to scale this type of care to seniors, we’re going to need to utilize technology. These tablets designed for seniors are a great place to start. Then, we can build from there.

I don’t think it will be long before we see doctors prescribing tablets to patients. It’s not currently in doctors normal line of thinking, but maybe it should be.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

The Amazing Power of Tablets Does More for Seniors’ Health Than Just Health Monitoring

Posted on March 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

One of the exploding areas of opportunity for healthcare is the growing senior market. It’s also one of its greatest challenges. Thanks to breakthroughs in medicine, we’re living longer and the number of seniors hitting retirement age continues to grow at an extraordinary rate.

With this growth in mind, we hear over and over again about healthcare solutions for seniors. This makes sense since seniors make up a large portion of healthcare dollars spent. Most of the health solutions targeted at seniors have focused on things like home health monitoring and remote health data collection.

While these solutions are powerful and interesting, lately I’ve come to realize that technology could play a much more powerful role in the health of seniors and it has nothing to do with the home health and remote monitoring technologies that are so in vogue. No, after many conversations I believe that even more powerful than health monitoring technologies is the way technology can improve a senior’s life.

This Samsung blog post highlights 5 major benefits seniors can receive from tablet usage:

  1. Social media: Keeping in touch with friends and family
  2. Content: Accessing information for leisure, learning and emergency preparedness
  3. Commerce: Convenient online shopping and access to user reviews for informed decision making
  4. Entertainment: Games and content that promote mental engagement
  5. Health: Accessing medical information, care plans, health apps and wellness content

One of the keys to keeping seniors healthy is to keep them engaged. Looking through this list might seem pretty rudimentary for the rest of us that live on technology. However, for a senior those social connections can mean the difference between life and death. Not to mention happiness in the life they still have left.

I saw this illustrated perfectly when my mother, who’s nearing retirement, told me that she was thinking about joining Facebook. This came as quite a shock to me since she’d always kind of shunned it as a waste of time and my mother (sweet as she may be) doesn’t have (or want) a cell phone. When I asked her why she was going to get on Facebook, she told me that she wanted to be on there because she believed that it would help her stay in touch with so many people she knows and loves (I hope that includes me, but is more likely my kids).

The great thing is that technology has now become really accessible for seniors. Take for example, the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro S that was just announced today. It’s taken a number of years, but they’ve finally gotten the mix of tablet and laptop in one device right.

The Galaxy Tab Pro S has a really slim design that’s light. Both of these features are enjoyed by seniors, but especially the light part. As you get older, the weight of items really matters. Plus, the keyboard option is great for seniors since many of them know how to type, but don’t do well with the touchscreen keyboards. The 10.5 hours of battery life is great too since that means they can use it all day and charge it through the night.

Before I hear from all the naysayers about seniors’ aversion to technology (that’s generally a myth that needs to be debunked), It’s surprising how many seniors are really adept at technology. Plus, for those that are less adept, there are great companies like Breezie and grandPad that are building software on top of tablets that simplify using a tablet even more. It’s now easier than ever for seniors to access the internet using tablets.

What we need to remember in healthcare is that our health is determined by much more than visits to the doctor’s office and our vital signs. Our ability to connect with the ones we love impacts our health. The entertainment and education we consume affects our health. Our ability to be independent affects our health. The right technology in seniors’ hands can impact all of these health factors in a significant way.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

What to Expect at HIMSS 2016 with Samsung CMO

Posted on February 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the full video recording embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

2016 February - What to Expect at HIMSS 2016 with Samsung CMO-blog

For our next Healthcare Scene interview, we’ll be sitting down with David Rhew, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung on Friday, February 26, 2016 at 4 PM ET (1 PM PT). With HIMSS 2016 just around the corner, we’ll have a lot to talk about as far as what we expect to hear and see at HIMSS. No doubt we’ll be talking about why a company that’s largely been known as a consumer company is having such a big presence at HIMSS. We’ll be sure to talk about the connected hospital, BYOD, healthcare security, Internet of Things (IoT), wearable technologies and much more.

You can join my live conversation with David Rhew, M.D. and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask Dr. Rhew questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Friday, February 26, 2016 at 4 PM ET (1 PM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’re hoping to include as many people in the conversation as possible. The discussion will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

As we usually do with these interviews, we’ll be doing a more formal interview with Dr. Rhew for the first ~30 minutes of this conversation. Then, we’ll open up the floor for others to ask questions or join us on camera. Each year I’ve seen Samsung’s presence in healthcare grow, so I’m excited to hear from Dr. Rhew about the Samsung perspective on healthcare IT and the HIMSS Annual Conference.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

By Supporting Digital Health, EMRs To Create Collective Savings of $78B Over Next Five Years

Posted on December 1, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Here’s the news EMR proponents have been insisting would emerge someday, justifying their long-suffering faith in the value of such systems.  A new study from Juniper Research has concluded that EMRs will save $78 billion cumulatively across the globe over the next five years, largely by connecting digital health technologies together.

While I’m tempted to get cynical about this — my poor heart has been broken by so many unsupportable or conflicting claims regarding EMR savings over the years — I think the study definitely bears examination. If digital health technologies like smart watches, fitness trackers, sensor-laden clothing, smart mobile health apps, remote monitoring and telemedicine share a common backbone that serves clinicians, the study’s conclusions look reasonable on first glance.

According to Juniper, the growth of ACOs is pushing providers to think on a population health level and that, in turn, is propelling them to adopt digital health tech.  And it’s not just top healthcare leaders that are getting excited about digital health. Juniper found that over the last 18 months, healthcare workers have become significantly more engaged in digital healthcare.

But how will providers come to grips with the floods of data generated by these emerging technologies? Why, EMRs will do the job. “Advanced EHRs will provide the ‘glue’ to bring together the devices, stakeholders and medical records in the future connected healthcare environment,” according to Juniper report author Anthony Cox.

But it’s important to note that at present, EMRs aren’t likely to have the capacity sort out the growing flood of connected health data on their own. Instead, it appears that healthcare providers will have to rely on data intermediary platforms like Apple’s HealthKit, Samsung’s SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions) and Microsoft Health. In reality, it’s platforms like these, not EMRs, that are truly serving as the glue for far-flung digital health data.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that on reflection, my cynical take on the study is somewhat justified. While they’ll play a very important role, I believe that it’s disingenuous to suggest that EMRs themselves will create huge healthcare savings.

Sure, EMRs are ultimately where the buck stops, and unless digital health data can be consumed by doctors at an EMR console, they’re unlikely to use it. But even though using EMRs as the backbone for digital health collection and population health management sounds peachy, the truth is that EMR vendors are nowhere near ready to offer robust support for these efforts.

Yes, I believe that the combination of EMRs and digital health data will prove to be very powerful over time. And I also believe that platforms like HealthKit will help us get there. I even believe that the huge savings projected by Juniper is possible. I just think getting there will be a lot more awkward than the study makes it sound.

Microsoft Joins Battle for Wearables Market

Posted on November 4, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Following the lead of several other companies big and small, Microsoft has jumped into the wearables healthcare market with a watch, a fitness tracker and a cloud-based platform that condenses and shares data.

It’s little wonder. After a few years of uncertainty, it seems pretty clear that the wearables market is taking off like a rocket. In fact, 21% of US consumers own such a device, according to research by PricewaterhouseCoopers. That’s slightly higher that the number of consumers who bought tablets during the first two years after they launched, PwC reports. Not only Microsoft, but Apple and Samsung, as well as smaller players with a high profile — such as Fitbit — are poised to take the sector by storm.

Microsoft’s new entry is called Microsoft Health, a platform letting users store health and fitness data. The date in question is collected by a Microsoft Health app, available on Android, iOS and Windows Phone. The platform also gathers data generated from the Microsoft Band, a smart and designed to work with Microsoft’s new platform.

The idea behind pulling all of this data into a single platform is to integrate data from different devices and services in a smart way that allows consumers to generate insights into their health. The next step for Microsoft Health, execs say, is to connect all of that data in the platform to the tech giant’s HealthVault, a Web-based PHR, making it easier for people to share data with their healthcare providers.

Other tech giants are making their own wearables plays, of course. Google, for example, has released Google Fit, a fitness-based app designed to help users track physical activity. Google’s approach is  Android smart phones, relying on sensors built into the smart phones to detect if the user is walking, running or biking. Users can also connect to devices and apps like Noom Coach and Withings.

Apple, for its part, has launched HealthKit, its competing platform for collecting data from various health and fitness apps.  The data can then be accessed easily by Apple users through the company’s Health app (which comes installed on the iPhone 6.) HealthKit is designed to send data directly to hospital and doctor charts as well. It also plans to launch a smart watch early next year.

While there’s little doubt consumers are interested in the wearables themselves, it’s still not clear how enthusiastic they are about pulling all of their activity onto a single platform. Providers might be more excited about taming this gusher of data, which has proved pretty intimidating to doctors already overwhelmed with standard EMR information, but it remains to be seen whether they’ll find fitness information to be helpful.

All told, it looks like there will be a rollicking battle for the hearts and minds of wearables consumers, as well as the loyalty of providers.  As for me, I think it will be a year or two, at minimum, before we get a real sense of what consumers and providers really want from these devices.