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Physician Focused on Computer Screen, Not Patient

Posted on April 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Definitely sends a message to the patient. I’m still just surprised that it’s still happening, but it is:

What’s annoying to me is that there are simple solutions to this problem. Not the least of which is positioning the screen in a way that you can look at your patient while you’re working on the computer. An even better way is Dr. James Legan’s approach that he calls #ProjectedEHR. In Dr. Legan’s case he plugs in an HDMI cable so that patients can see him work in the EHR. Plus, he can show patients their results and other health info.

Plenty of other doctors just choose not to document in the exam room so they can focus on the patient. As mobile EHR interfaces develop, I could see a partial documentation done on a mobile phone or tablet and then the rest of the documentation done after the fact as well. I’m a little surprised we haven’t seen more of this already.

Of course, I’ve written for many years about the coming video EHR. That would be a game changer. Although, would certainly take a dramatic change in perspective. Scribes are also popular with many people I know. I’ve even heard of people working on remote scribes which is quite interesting.

What other solutions have you employed to combat the challenges of interacting with patients and the EHR?

Scribes and Problems with the Healthcare System

Posted on April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent #HITsm chat we had a pretty good discussion about scribes and their place in healthcare. I know a lot of people that are really big proponents of scribes, but I also know many people who are against them.

During the discussion, the question was asked if scribes mask the problems of the EHR software. This was my reponse:

If I were to do that tweet again, I might replace healthcare system with reimbursement system. Scribes are a mask to the fundamental problems with how we pay for healthcare. I’ve always loved to think about what an EHR would look like if it didn’t have to worry about billing. It would be a completely different system than what we have with EHRs today.

The reality is that doctors want to get paid and so EHRs have to deal with billing. Plus, now they have to deal with meaningful use regulation as well. Add those two together and you can understand why scribes are so popular with doctors.

Every single EHR would be better and easier to use if they were just worrying about providing a tool to doctors that lets them document the visit and ensure quality patient care. However, until that happens (which is never) scribes and other alternative methods to document are going to be very popular with many physicians.