Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Singapore Launches National EHR, London Hospitals Go To The Cloud

Posted on June 27, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Today I bring you a couple of interesting clinical data stories from outside the U.S. One involves a cloud pilot and the other a national EHR; while U.S. providers are toying with the former, I doubt the latter will ever happen. Anyway, without further ado:

* Singapore Launches National EHR

Working with Accenture, the country of Singapore recently launched one of the world’s first national EHR systems. The system itself seems straightforward — it will capture medical data and patient demographics across clinic, acute care and community hospital settings — but its scale makes the project unique.

Obviously, the U.S. is nowhere near to creating such a network, and given our industry’s chaotic structure, I don’t see it happening anytime soon. Even centralized, nationally-controlled health systems are struggling to pull something like this off.

It certainly helps that Singapore has a population of just five million; the country plans to spend $144 million just to reach this relatively small group. It’s hard to imagine what it would cost to roll out such a network across the U.K., much less a giant country like the U.S.

Not surprisingly, Accenture worked with many vendors to make the rollout work, including Oracle, Orion Health, IBM and HP.  The partners completed the first stage of the rollout in 10 months (pretty impressive, if you ask me!)

*  National Health Service Pilots Cloud-Based Health Data Services

Next month, London’s Chelsea and Westminster Hospitals plan to begin storing all patient data in in the cloud. The effort, known as E-Health Cloud, is a National Health Service pilot test. The system will offer fine-grained access controls, allowing patients to decide exactly which clinicians, friends and family members can access their records.  According to a report in Engadget, security is tight; users will have to verify their ID multiple times to access their medical data.

As you may know, a small number of U.S. hospitals are experimenting with storing data in private and public clouds. But I’d wager that this effort, backed by a national entity that can roll things out when it pleases, is likely to move far more quickly than U.S. healthcare cloud deployments.

So, progress in Singapore and the U.K.  Somehow, knowing what can be done, the state of regional HIEs and cloud projects in the U.S. seems a little bit depressing, doesn’t it?

Accenture Contracted for Singapore EHR Implementation

Posted on August 2, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I wrote previously about the Signapore government accepting proposals for a national EHR. Today I got the news that Accenture has been contracted to implement the Singapore National Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. Obviously Accenture is a big name and a big group. I’ll be interested to learn which EHR software system they plan to implement to create the national EHR system. International EMR movement like this is very interesting.

Here’s the press release from Accenture about the announcement.

Accenture Wins Contract to Implement Singapore’s National Electronic Health Record System

SINGAPORE; Aug. 2, 2010 – The Singapore Ministry of Health has awarded Accenture (NYSE: ACN) a contract to implement the National Electronic Health Record (NEHR) system, a key enabler of Singapore’s vision toward a national, integrated health care system. The NEHR is designed to improve the quality of healthcare for citizens, lower the costs of health services, and promote more effective health policies.

Under the NEHR, key medical information such as patient demographics, allergies, clinical diagnoses, medication history, radiology reports, laboratory investigations and discharge summaries will be exchangeable among healthcare providers. Patients also may benefit from proper, right-sited disease management and cost savings, as duplicate or unnecessary tests are eliminated and medication errors are reduced.

“As the centerpiece of Singapore’s connected health vision, the NEHR is intended to provide a holistic view of a patient’s health information. With this market-leading offering, health care providers can have the right information at the right time to make the best care decisions,” said Stephen J. Rohleder, group chief executive of Accenture’s Health & Public Service operating group. “We congratulate the Ministry of Health for taking this bold step to create a new foundation to help support meaningful advances to Singapore’s health care system.”

The National Electronic Health Record vision – “One Singaporean, One Health Record” – was previously announced by Singapore Health Minister Khaw Boon Wan. With the initial system release in April 2011, Singapore will be one of the first countries in the world to implement a national electronic health record system.

The Accenture team includes Oracle, Orion Health, Initiate Systems, Inc., and Hewlett-Packard.

UPDATE:
Mark told us who will be providing the software for the Singapore EHR in the comments. EHR Software is being delivered by 3 Partners;

Oracle’s HTB is the core Clinical Data Repository
Initiate is providing the Master Patient Index; and
Orion Health the Clinical Viewer & Messaging fabric using their Concerto & Rhapsody products.

Singapore EMR

Posted on January 6, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m always fascinated by the various EMR initiatives that are happening around the world. I think there’s a lot to learn from other countries that are smaller and have different healthcare systems which don’t cause the same problems we have in the US. One project I heard about recently has the Singapore government inviting EMR vendors to make a proposal for a Singapore EMR system. Here’s some details of what Singapore’s doing from Future Gov.

The Singapore government is inviting vendors to submit proposals to ‘design, develop, supply, deliver, install, test, commission and support’ a clinical management system (CMS) cum electronic medical record (EMR) system for general practitioners.

The GP Clinic Electronic Medical Record and Operation System (“Project CLEO”), will comprise of a CMS and a GP-oriented EMR, with the focus of ‘facilitating better quality and safer patient care in addition to optimizing clinic operations for better and more efficient patient service’, according to the Information Systems Division of Ministry of Health Holdings (MOHH), subsidiary of the Ministry of Health which takes care of the country’s public hospitals.

MOHH is also responsible for the development of the country’s National Electronic Health Record (EHR), an ambitious project to realise ‘one patient, one record’ in the island-state.

Sounds like an ambitious and very interesting EMR project. If you know of other EMR projects happening around the world, please let me know.