Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Solution for “Too Many Clicks” Problem in EHR?

Posted on January 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been intrigued by the complaint I hear from doctors about “too many clicks” in the EHR. Long time readers may even remember my piano analogy which looks at the issue of too many mouseclicks and keystrokes in EHR software. I still think that largely applies today.

With that said, I’ve been fascinated to watch the evolution of click free solutions like what Note Swift is offering. Many are familiar with Dragon Naturally speaking an in particular the Dragon Medical product. It does amazing voice recognition. What I love about NoteSwift is that it takes Dragon’s voice recognition and integrates it naturally into the EHR interface.

Here’s a demo video that was all done by voice using NoteSwift to illustrate how it works:

I think it’s fascinating to see the evolution of these products. Plus, with things like Siri. “Ok Google”, and even Amazon Echo,we’re creating a culture of people who are use to using their voice to do things. So, that will help efforts like the one above.

No doubt doctors are blown away by the concept of documenting a patient visit with 1, 3, or 5 clicks. Now let me leave what’s available today and think into the future. Imagine a video EHR which was voice enabled. The doctor could literally go into the room and using video, voice recognition, NLP, technologies like NoteSwift, connected devices, etc they could easily chart a note with no clicks. While that’s not happening tomorrow, it’s not as far fetched as you might imagine.

Medical Siri on the iPhone and iPad

Posted on November 11, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my regular physician readers, Brian, left the following comment on my post about the mythology of the Perfect EMR.

The reality is that we are now comparing EMR to our iPhone 4s’s. Our consumer technology is so far ahead of hospital technology that it is jarring and annoying to use work tech. This is what I want: “Siri, give me a differential for elevated amylase. Thank you. Now order CBC, Chem 14, TSH and free T4. Good. Now I will dictate. The patient is a 41 year old man with abdominal pain…”

Certainly we could have a long discussion about the difference in consumer technology and popular healthcare technology. However, I couldn’t help but wonder how many doctors have tried out Siri on their iPhone in order to get healthcare information. I bet this is pretty common. Although, I wonder how good the answers are that Siri gives.

If you’re a medical provider that’s used Siri for accessing health and medical information, I’d love to hear about your experience. I bet there are probably also a bunch of funny experiences trying to use Siri for medical info. I’d love to hear those as well.

Are there ways that “Siri” like technology could and should be implemented in EMR and EHR software?