Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Where Will We See Analytics in Ambulatory Medicine?

Posted on April 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I prepare to head to the mecca of healthcare IT conferences, I’m getting inundated with pitches. Much like last year, analytics is still a really popular topic. It seems like every healthcare IT vendor has some analytics offering. Many abuse the term analytics (which is fine by me) and that term has come to mean analyzing your health data in order to provide value.

As I think about analytics, I wonder how much of it will apply to the small physician practice. I should do this survey, but I bet if I asked 5 physicians working in small group or solo practices about their analytics strategy they’d all give me blank stares. Small physician practices don’t have an analytics strategy. They’re not looking for new ways to leverage analytics to improve their practice. That’s not how a small practice thinks.

So, does analytics have a place in small ambulatory medicine?

The short answer is that it absolutely does. However, I think that it will be delivered in two forms: packaged or purchased by the borg.

In the packaged approach, analytics will be part of a small practice’s EHR system. Much like a doctor doesn’t have a mobile EHR strategy (it just comes with the EHR), they won’t have an analytics strategy either. They’ll just take the analytics solutions that come with the EHR.

In some ways, the reporting capabilities in an EHR have been doing this forever. However, very few organizations have been able to use these reports effectively. The next trend in EHR analytics will be to push the data to the user when and where they need it as opposed to having to pull a report. Plus, the EHR analytics will start trying to provide some insights into the reports as opposed to just displaying raw data.

One key for ambulatory EHR vendors is that they won’t likely be able to build all the EHR analytics functions that a doctor will want and need. This is why it’s so important that EHR vendors embrace the open API approach to working with outside companies. Many of these third party software companies will provide EHR analytics on top of the EHR software.

In the purchased by the borg scenario, the small practice will get purchased by the borg (You know…the major hospital system in the area). This is happening all over the place. In fact, many small practices cite the reason for selling out to the local hospital is that they don’t think they’ll be able to keep up with the technology requirements. One of those major requirements will be around analytics. We’ll see how far it goes, but I think many small practices are scared they won’t be able to keep up.

Ok, there’s one other scenario as well. The local hospital system or possibly even a local ACO will purchase a package of analytics software (ie. purchased by the bog) and then you’ll tap into them in order to get the benefits of a healthcare analytics solution. We see this already starting to happen. I’ve heard mixed results from around the country. No doctor really likes this situation since it ties them so deeply with the local hospital, but they usually can’t think of a better option.

That’s my take on how analytics will make its way to ambulatory practices. Of course, most large hospital systems also own a large number of ambulatory practices as well. So, some of the analytics will trickle down to ambulatory in those systems as well. I just wonder how much value ambulatory doctors will get from the hospital analytics vendors that are chosen. I can already hear the ambulatory doctors complaining about the analytics reports that don’t work for them because they’re so hospital focused.

Where are you seeing analytics in the ambulatory setting?

US EMR Market to Exceed $8 Billion in 2016

Posted on January 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, I’ve moved a lot of my discussion of the EMR and Health IT markets to my site: EMR Thoughts. I’ve done a lot of posts on that site that look at the EMR market, the health IT investments, the Health IT incubators (or accelerators if you prefer), and other movement in the EMR, EHR and Health IT markets. If you like that type of content, you should definitely subscribe to the EMR Thoughts email list.

Even though, I’ve moved a lot of my EMR market discussion to the other site, every once in a while I’ll drop in some EMR market stuff on here as well. In the article linked in my Costco EMR post, they discussed the size of the EMR market:

Millennium Research Group said in its November report, “U.S. Markets for Electronic Medical Records 2012,” that the U.S. market for EMRs will exceed $8 billion by 2016, with the fastest-growing segment occurring in the small-practice market. Web-based EMRs that don’t require an expensive information technology infrastructure are contributing to the growth, the report said, because they are an affordable option for small practices on tight budgets.

I always hate when they don’t split the EHR market into ambulatory EHR and hospital EHR. I also still haven’t figure out a good way to reconcile that the EMR market in the US will be $8 billion in 2016, but we’ll have spent a good portion of the $36 billion of EHR stimulus money by 2016. Those two numbers don’t jive very well.

I also find it interesting that the fastest-growing segment of the EMR market is the small-practices. I’m not sure I agree with this. I think the larger sales and hospital EHR sales are brisker than the small practice EMR market. Much of the small practice market is still “waiting and seeing.”