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What’s the Impact of MACRA on Small Practices?

Posted on July 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had a chance to sit down and chat with Tom Giannulli, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Kareo and Michael Sherling, MD, MBA, Chief Medical Officer and Co-founder of Modernizing Medicine, to talk about the impact of the MACRA legislation on small practices. Both of these CMOs at EHR vendors rode the meaningful use wave and now they’re preparing to ride the new MACRA wave as well. So, they were the perfect people to talk about the impact of MACRA on small practices and how a small practice should prepare themselves for the new MACRA legislation. If you’re a small practice that’s wondering about MACRA (or doesn’t even know what it is), then take the time to watch the video below to see what it means for small practices.

After our formal interviews, we always like to hold what we call the “after party.” We never know how it’s going to go. Sometimes people join in and offer their insights and ask questions and sometimes they don’t. In this case, we continued our conversation about the MACRA and small practices, but we also talked about the impact that legislation like MACRA has on an EHR vendors development lifecycle. You can learn more about MACRA in the video below:

This post was a great way to wrap up the week and also for us to announce a new blog post series we’re starting on Monday called MACRA Monday. Long time readers may remember the Meaningful Use Monday series of blog posts we did every Monday for a few years. This will be similar as we dive into the MACRA legislation and help small medical practices understand the details of what’s coming in MACRA. Watch for that on Monday!

A Small Practice View of Healthcare IT Coming Out of #HIMSS16

Posted on March 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week as I slowly recover from the #HIMSSHaze that sets in after spending a week with 41,000 of your closest friends and 1300+ vendors, I’m taking a second to think about how the small physician practice fits into the future of healthcare IT that was presented at HIMSS 2016.

As the graphic at the bottom of this post shows, just over 40% of attendees at HIMSS are providers. Of course, provider is a pretty broad term and that has to also be paired with the other number on that chart that 30.5% of attendees are part of the C-Suite. Even scarier is that only 2.2% of HIMSS registrations identified themselves as clinicians.

Those who read this blog regularly likely remember that I already wrote about physicians and patients missing at HIMSS. These numbers seem to prove this out. It’s unfortunate, because that means that the physician voice is largely going to be missing in many of the conversations that happen at a show like HIMSS.

With this in mind, it’s not surprising that I think the future for the small practice is on shaky ground. Many of the solutions presented at HIMSS are going to be hard for a small practice to afford. At some point these health IT solutions will be so good that they’ll become the standard of care. Once that happens, where does that leave the small practice provider who can’t afford these high tech solutions?

Considering many small practices aren’t joining in these conversations, I think it’s going to leave many small practices up a creek without a paddle. No doubt there’s a large portion of the physician population that are betting that retirement will come before this becomes a reality. Others probably think that the worst that could happen is that they’ll have to work for a large organization.

Despite this rather negative outlook on the future of small practices, there is some hope. When you look at the work that Farzad Mostashari is doing at Aledade to make accountable care and valuable based reimbursement available to the small practices you can see a future where small practices can survive even in this changing reimbursement landscape.

I think there are two models that I see emerging to allow small practices to keep some autonomy and survive in this changing healthcare world. First, small practices have to join together with other small practices to be able to create a large enough entity to be able to share in the costs associated with this future technology and to be able to compete with much larger hospital systems. Second, we need organizations like Aledade that help small practices survive by spreading their resources across a diverse group of small practices.

There is strength in numbers. So, whether the small practices form together themselves or whether health IT vendors essentially create a network of small practices, either option requires small practices to combine their efforts in order to survive. It reminds me of this clip from the film Finding Nemo. Small practices need to start “Swimming Together!”

Here’s a look at the registration numbers for HIMSS 2016:
HIMSS 2016 Registrations by Title and Worksite

We’re Hosting the #KareoChat and Discussing Value Based Care and ACOs – Join Us!

Posted on June 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ACO and Value Based Reimbursement Twitter Chat
We’re excited to be hosting this week’s #KareoChat on Thursday, 6/25 at 9 AM PT (Noon ET) where we’ll be diving into the details around Value Based Care and ACOs. We’ll be hosting the chat from @ehrandhit and chiming in on occasion from @techguy and @healthcarescene as well.

The topic of value based care and ACOs is extremely important to small practice physicians since understanding and participating in it will be key to their survival. At least that’s my take. I look forward to hearing other people’s thoughts on these changes on Thursday’s Twitter chat. Here are the questions we’ll be discussing over the hour:

  1. What’s the latest trends in value based reimbursement that we should know or watch? #KareoChat
  2. Why or why aren’t you participating in an ACO? #KareoChat
  3. Describe the pros and cons you see with the change to value based reimbursement. #KareoChat
  4. What are you doing to prepare your practice for value based reimbursement and ACOs? #KareoChat
  5. Which technologies and applications will we need in a value based reimbursement and ACO world? #KareoChat
  6. What’s the role of small practices in a value based reimbursement world? Can they survive? #KareoChat

For those of you not familiar with a Twitter chat, you can follow the discussion on Twitter by watching the hashtag #KareoChat. You can also take part in the Twitter chat by including the #KareoChat hashtag in any tweets you send.

I look forward to “seeing” and learning from many of you on Twitter on Thursday. Feel free to start the conversation in the comments below as well.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is a sponsor of EMR and EHR.

Small Meaningful Use Penalties for Small Practices

Posted on February 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Michelle has posted an interesting CMS analysis of the price of EHR penalties for physicians:

CMS reports that the majority of physicians who will be penalized this year for not having met MU requirements will lose less than $1,000 of their Medicare reimbursement; 34% of the penalties will be $250 or less, while 31% will exceed $2,000.

The adjustments will impact approximately 257,000 eligible providers. While no one likes losing money, the CMS penalty “stick” is pretty small compared to the overall cost of implementing an EHR.

Unfortunately her link to the CMS report seemed to be the wrong link. I’d love to dig into the 31% of doctors who will exceed $2000 in penalties. $2000 still isn’t very compelling to most doctors I know, but if it scales from there we could see how many doctors are really going to suffer from the EHR penalties.

What’s also not clear to me is if this includes the PQRS penalties as well. All of the penalties start to add up. I also heard one doctor talk about the feared 22% Medicare cut that’s been delayed for a decade or so (I lose track of the number of years). I’ll be surprised if those cuts aren’t delayed again, but it’s interesting that many doctors fear these cuts even if they’re likely to be delayed. Perception is still very important.

Back to the meaningful use penalties, $1000 penalty is not something most doctors will bat an eye at. Even those who have an EHR are opting out of meaningful use stage 2. The math doesn’t work out for small practices. $1000 of penalties certainly won’t balance the equation either. I expect a very small number of small practices to do meaningful use stage 2. Hospitals on the other hand are a different story.

Doctors Dump Small Practices To Join Large Providers

Posted on November 5, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Intimidated, in part, by the health IT expenses they’re expected to bear, doctors are leaving private practices to seek jobs with large healthcare organizations, according to a new study by Accenture.  The need to purchase EMRs certainly isn’t the only reason doctors are jumping ship, but it is one of the most important reasons, the firm found.

Accenture interviewed 204 doctors in May, drawing from an even mix of primary care docs and specialists across equally-divided sections of the U.S.

The study results projected that only 36 percent of doctors will remain part of an independent practice by 2013, down from 39 percent this year and 57 percent in 2000. (I knew doctors were streaming into integrated health systems but that blew my mind.)

According to the Accenture survey, 53 percent of doctors responding said that EMRs requirements drove them to look for employment with big health organizations.

Doctors are also spending big on updated practice management, billing and scheduling applications. My guess is that in some cases mobile health spending is beginning to rear its head as well, even in smaller practices. After all, while doctors generally bring their own devices to the party, practices may see it as in their interest to own mobile gear and applications as they become more central to care delivery.

On the other hand, health IT may also be the saving grace for some. Doctors who do remain independent are likely to offer telemedicine or online consultations to help keep their profits at an acceptable level, researchers found.

Readers, I doubt any of you are too surprised by Accenture’s findings. I doubt public policy planners are either.

Given these realities, I’ve always wondered why no one has proposed re-structuring Meaningful Use for smaller organizations to account for the disproportionate effect such investments have on the smallest practices, say those with five doctors or less.  Incentives are all well and good, but if we don’t want to see independent practice all but wiped out, perhaps some up-front grants are in order.