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Farzhad Uses Twitter to Call Out EHR Vendors

Posted on September 12, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When it comes to ONC, I think a few things have always been clear:
1. ONC has its heart in the right place.
2. ONC hates the government restrictions that have to work within as much as the rest of us.

If you’ve ever had a chance to meet with someone from ONC in person, then you know the first item to be true. They really do have a sincere desire to improve healthcare in America through the implementation of IT. Not only do you see that in person, but their actions compliment this as well. In fact, I’d say that they’re some of the most sincere parts of Washington DC that I’ve ever met.

The challenge comes with the second point. ONC has to work within the legislation and government regulations that they’re given. I once posted about Blumenthal’s HIMSS adress as being meaningless. Someone at ONC found it and asked what they could do to make his address more meaningful. I told them nothing, because he was subject to the government muzzle. I think they’re reply was something like, “Many of us here don’t like the government muzzle either.” Another simple example of how they are very sincere people at ONC. I wonder if Blumenthal could offer a non-muzzled speech now.

I say all of this as background for a tweet that Farzad Mostashari sent out to EHR vendors. The thing I love most about this tweet is that Farzad is using the farthest extent of his power possible to push forward health IT within the government framework. This is no easy task, but I think Farzad’s tweet is brilliant:

I think the ONC pledge is still being considered by many EHR vendors. I know how EHR companies make decisions and so this won’t be any different. However, Farzad already posted this tweet with EHR companies that have made the pledge:

I’ve also seen tweets from NextGen and Azzly. We’ll see if others pop up on the #ONCPledge hashtag.

Oh the power of a tweet! Can you imagine how simple, but powerful Farzad’s request could be? No complicated legislation. No expensive stimulus. No mind numbing regulation. Just good old fashioned public pledge to do what’s right. I wonder how else this could be used.

The Fast EHR Companies and the 37Signals EHR Companies

Posted on September 4, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently reading this fascinating interview with Jason Fried, Founder of 37signals. It’s a fascinating read, as was his book Rework. I must admit that I have a similar model for tech entrepreneurship to Jason Fried and it is quite different than what’s written about by most tech websites. Jason is much less about the flash and cash part of entrepreneurship and much more about building something of value in a long term sustainable way.

As I consider on these ideas, I started to wonder about the various EHR companies and which companies fall into the various entrepreneurship buckets.

Fast EMR
The fast EMR company is usually one that’s gone out and gotten a ton of funding from venture capital firms. If you’re an EHR company that’s gone out and raised millions and millions in funding, then you have no choice but to attack the market aggressively so that you can provide a return to your investors. There are actually a number of EHR companies that fit this profile, but the first one that will likely come into everyone’s mind is Practice Fusion. There $64 million in EHR funding means that they have to get a large portion of the EHR market. They no longer have the option of staying small but successful.

Let me be clear that there’s nothing wrong with being a Fast EMR. In fact, there are a lot of good things that come out of fast EMR companies that are trying to push the envelope when it comes to EHR adoption and how EHR should be done. It is entrepreneurship at work.

Slow and Steady EMR
On the opposite end of the spectrum are what I call the slow and steady EMR companies. These companies are often self funded or took in a much smaller investment and then used revenues to grow the company much like 37signals founder described. They slowly and steadily built their product, acquired customers and generated revenue.

I believe that SOAPware and Amazing Charts are the epitome of this type of company. They were both physician founded EMR companies that have built their user base slowly over time. They’ve never gone out and gotten the millions in funding. Instead they’ve grown organically over time.

Why Does This Matter?
In my e-Book on EHR selection, I talk about why it is important for you to understand the type of EHR company you are choosing. Would you rather “marry” the EMR tortoise or the EMR hare? The choice could change your EHR experience dramatically.

Disclosure: Practice Fusion, Amazing Charts and SOAPware are all advertisers on this site, but I didn’t discuss this post with them before posting it. Although, since they’re advertisers they were likely top of mind for me when I was writing this post.

Hospital EMR Vendor Consolidating, But Physician EMR Market Still Dynamic

Posted on March 6, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

If you don’t check out the HIMSS group on LinkedIn from time to time, you should. I always pick up something to think about when I visit, and this time was no exception.

A group of IT pros, most of whom seemed to have plenty of institutional memory of EMRs gone by, were talking about whether the current leaders of the EMR vendor pack would take over and most of the rest fall away.  The consensus, not surprisingly, was that hospital CEOs are herd animals, and that a few leaders are likely to take most of the market.

As things stand today, even EMRs that seem to be a better fit usually lose to the Epics, Cerners and Meditechs of the world, writes Richard Rauber, FHIMSS.

“Let’s say the preferred EMR has 10 clients similar to their facility, and the second choice has 75 clients in the same bed range with a high level of user satisfaction. Is the risk/reward ratio low enough to go with the smaller vendor? It today’s market it would be unlikely.”

If these posters are right, the hospital market is going to standardize on a dozen or so of the most successful vendors. Unfortunately, that’s likely to lead to some really nasty implementations, suggests Terry Montgomery, PMP: “I had such a project last year. They had to move the go live date three times and there were still bugs they had to fix.”

That being said, I think there will be a lot more dancing when it comes to the physician EMR market.  You’ve got breakout models like the no-cost Practice Fusion — and its bundle of VC cash to fuel the fire — iPad-based DrChrono, Free Mitochon PMS-EHR-HIE and a growing number of elegant, doctor-crafted implementations like SOAPware and Amazing Charts.

While the dynamic of hospital IT purchasing is to standardize on the big boys (the old “nobody gets fired for buying IBM” syndrome), physicians can’t afford to buy a system just because the practice across town thought it was cool. Not that such doesn’t happen, but it’s less likely.

I predict that doctors will have some great options to choose from when they hit HIMSS13 next year, systems integrated intelligently with revenue cycle needs but also cleanly designed and physician friendly.

The smaller EMR companies focused on doctors are just doing a better job of mirroring a doctor’s process, there no doubt in my mind. If only such logic would float upward to the billion-dollar boys behind the hospital giants.

Full Disclosure: Practice Fusion, Mitochon, SOAPware and Amazing Charts are advertisers on this blog.

EMR and EHR Rating Websites

Posted on October 20, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are a number of EMR and EHR rating websites out there. The problem that I have is that none of them are really very good at all. They all have MAJOR weaknesses and some are just completely and utterly flawed. Some require the EMR and EHR vendors to pay them to be rated. Doesn’t that just wreak of conflict of interest?

There’s just so many ways to have the ratings of EMR and EHR vendors be skewed. Dr. Oates, Founder of SOAPware, recently wrote a blog post about the problems with many of the EMR and EHR rating websites and reports. Certainly he has a vested interest in his EMR software to be ranked highly, but this part aside he raises some very important questions about the accuracy and value of these various ranking systems.

Here’s one sample of the challenge of ranking and rating EMR and EHR vendors:

In addition to accepting user evaluations, many of the ranking systems require that vendors also fill in yes/no to a large list of features. Historically, many vendors have demonstrated tendencies to answer “yes” to functionalities to which a “no” would have been more accurate. Because we tend to answer honestly, we have sometimes ended up inaccurately appearing to be less functional than some others.
There are inherent problems with each of these surveys in that the survey results can, and often are, manipulated by the vendors who are paying a the most of attention to them. Because these surveys are the result of users offering information, some vendors will expend great effort to be certain that many, mostly happy users of their product are in some fashion encouraged to participate in the surveys. SOAPware has typically avoided such activities, because it ends up being a game to see who can motivate the most satisfied users to engage the ranking system.

This is just a small sample of the challenges of trying to honestly and effectively get quality ratings and reviews of EMR and EHR vendors. Yet, providers and practice managers have an insatiable appetite to try and get information on the various EMR and EHR vendors.

Trust me, this is not an easy issue. If I knew the solution, I’d have already done it myself. I write about this since I think it’s a valuable and important message for doctors to be very very careful trusting any of the data coming out of these EMR and EHR ratings websites. Instead, go download the Free copy of my EMR Selection e-Book and do the work necessary to rate them based on your specific practice needs.

IBM Launches Collaborative Care Solution with SOAPware as The EMR

Posted on August 9, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: See the comments from Randall Oates below where he explains that SOAPware is just one of the EMR/EHR options that will be connecting to the Collaborative Care Solution that IBM is offering. It seems the IBM offering amounts to more of an HIE specification that any and/or all EMR vendors can adopt. A little different idea than what I posted below.

I’m sure most people in the tech world remember the days when Big Blue ruled the tech world. In fact, there’s even a saying which I’ve been hearing more and more lately that basically goes that “no tech person ever got fired by choosing IBM.” Basically meaning that everyone was choosing IBM and so it was a safe bet. Kind of reminds me of Epic in the hospital IT space.

Well, last week IBM made an announcement about their new Collaborative Care Solution. The press release is honestly one of the worst I’ve seen. Usually amidst the PR speak you can at least summarize what they’re really doing in a couple sentences. Sadly, I can’t do that from the press release.

There was also a post about the IBM announcement on the SOAPware blog. Still not a very informative post, but it does provide the interesting connection between the solution IBM is offering that with the SOAPware EMR. A good announcement for SOAPware, especially after their release of the SOAPware PMS software.

I confirmed that the SOAPware EMR/PMS will be what IBM is offering with their Collaborative Care Solution. It will be interesting to see how this collaboration develops. Is it a real collaboration or just another marketing arm for SOAPware.

CALLING ALL DOCTORS! EMR Software Opinions Wanted

Posted on July 24, 2009 I Written By

This is a SHOUT OUT to all doctors who use EMRs. Which EMRs do you use and how do you like them. Do you love them or hate them? Are you luke warm in your like or dislike? Tell us which EMR you have and how you feel about it. Also tell us what you would do (the mistakes and the good moves) if you were looking into getting an EMR at this time.

I have personally looked at Greenway PrimeSuite, SOAPware, SRSsoft, e-MDs, AmazingCharts, NextGen, Centricity and others.

Can you comment on the cost and the usability?. Let’s share information so we can help other doctors choose systems that are usable, simple to learn, effective and efficient.

If you don’t have an EMR and are looking into one, what questions would you have for those “who have gone before you”? What advice would you be interested in receiving?