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Specialty Specific EHR

Posted on June 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been a fan of the specialty specific EHR vendor. I’ve seen over and over again how much of a difference a specialty specific EHR can make in a practice. It’s a slippery slope when a specialty specific EHR starts entering other specialties. We’d like to think that every doctor is the same, but the variation in the needs of different specialties is rarely given the attention it deserves.

What scares me is that if we’re not careful, the specialty specific EHR vendor might be a dying breed. This isn’t because the specialty specific EHR vendors aren’t loved by their users more than the alternatives. Instead it’s the shift towards hospital owned medical practices that puts the specialty specific EHR in danger.

While hospital systems would love to support a best of breed approach to EHR software and allow each specialty to choose their own, I’ve never seen it actually happen. When push comes to shove, the hospital system starts rolling out an EHR vendor that “supports” every one of their specialties. It’s hard to blame an executive for making this choice. The logistics of supporting 20+ EHR vendors is onerous to put it lightly. The efficiency of one EHR vendor for a large multi specialty organization is just impossible to ignore. Long term however, I wonder if the downsides will cause major issues.

I should also declare that I don’t think a specialty specific EHR is always the best option. Some specialty specific EHR software aren’t very good either. In fact, I was recently thinking through the list of medical specialties and there were a lot of specialties where I didn’t know of a specialty specific EHR for them.

The one that struck me the most was that I didn’t know of an OB/GYN specific EHR. Is that really the case? I’ve seen hundreds of EHR and I couldn’t think of ever seeing an OB/GYN specific EHR. Maybe I’ve missed it, and if I have then I’d love to learn about one. I imagine the reason there isn’t one is because many of the larger All in One EHR vendors have put a decent focus on OB/GYN functionality. So, maybe no one wanted to compete with what was out there already? That’s speculation. What’s odd to me though is that OB/GYN seems like the perfect case where a specialty specific EHR could really benefit that specialty. They have some really unique needs and workflows. I’d think there would be massive competition around their specific challenges.

What I’ve also found is even the EHR vendors that are happy to sell to any specialty and probably have a few templates for that specialty (Yes, that’s how many EHR vendors “support” every specialty), even the All In One EHR vendors work better for certain specialties. This is often based on which specialties the EHR vendor had success with first. If 80 of your first 100 EHR sales are to cardiologists, then you can bet that your EHR is going to work better for cardiologists than it will for podiatrists.

With this in mind, let’s work as a community to aggregate a list of specialty specific EHR vendors. I’ll be generous and say that if an EHR vendor works with more than 10 EHR specialties, then it’s not a specialty specific EHR (5 is probably a better number). If you’re an EHR vendor and want to admit which specialties you work better for, then I’d love to hear that too.

Can we find a specialty specific EHR for every medical specialty? I look forward to seeing if we can in the comments.

Specialty EHR Speaks that Specialty

Posted on June 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been a proponent of the role of specialty specific EHRs. In fact, at one point I suggested that a really great EHR company could be a roll up of the top specialty specific EHRs. I still think this would be an extraordinary company that could really compete with the top EHR vendors out there. For now, I haven’t seen anyone take that strategy.

There are just some really compelling reasons to focus your EHR on a specific specialty. In fact, what you find is that even the EHR vendor that claims to support every medical specialty is usually best fit for one or a couple specific specialties. Just ask for their client list and you’ll have a good idea of which specialty likes their system the most.

I was recently talking with a specialty EHR vendor and they made a good case for why specialists love working with them. The obvious one he didn’t mention was that the EHR functions are tailored to that specialty. Everyone sees and understands this.

What most people don’t think about is when they talk to the support or sales people at that company. This is particularly important with the support people. It’s a very different experience calling an EHR vendor call center that supports every medical specialty from one that supports only your specialty. They understand your specialties unique needs, terminology, and language. Plus, any reference clients they give you are going to be in your specialty so you can compare apples to apples.

Certainly there can be weaknesses in a specialty specific EHR. For example, if you’re in a large multi specialty organization you really can’t go with a specialty specific EHR. It’s just not going to happen. With so many practices being acquired by hospitals, this does put the specialty specific EHR at risk (depending on the specialty).

Another weakness is when you want to connect your EHR to an outside organization. Most of them can handle lab and prescription interfaces without too much pain. However, connecting to a hospital or HIE can often be a challenge or cost you a lot of money to make happen. Certainly the meaningful use interoperability requirements and HL7 standards help some. We’ll see if it’s enough or if the future of healthcare interoperability will need something more. For example, will specialty specific EHR be able to participate in CommonWell if it achieves its goals?

There’s a case to be made on both sides of the specialty specific EHR debate. As with most EHR decisions, you have to choose which things matter most to your clinic.