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“We’re Dreaming of White Christmas” EHR Parody Video

Posted on December 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Maybe I’m just in a bit of a marketing mood with all my planning for the Health Care IT Marketing and PR Conference, but I really enjoyed a parody video from SRSsoft to the song “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas.” Their version is called “We’re Dreaming of the SRS White Version.” Check it out embedded below:

Here’s a link to the webinars they mention in the video. The link also mentions their new version is going to have Smart Workflows™ amidst other product enhancements. However, they’re being kind of tight lipped about the updates.

Certainly this seems to just be the next version of the SRSsoft EHR, but I appreciated that they sent me a creative way of announcing the new release as opposed to a stale press release stating that they’re about to have a new release of their software. I like to reward that kind of creativity.

I guess we’ll have to wait until January to see if they can deliver on what the video promises.

What Are the KPIs for EHR Going Forward?

Posted on October 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been noting a real maturing in the EHR and healthcare IT markets over the past 6 months. There’s not as much news coming out about EHR developments or government programs related to EHR. Plus, the announcements that do come out are an evolution of the same topic. I still am interested in the concept of a care management system, but I digress.

With EHR implementation maturity upon us (although many would likely that we’re still not that mature), I was excited by the question Lester Parada asked on the SRSSoft EMR Straight Talk blog about new KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) in the new world of value based reimbursement. I love the concept of creating some new KPIs.

In the post, Lester suggests a look at:

  • Cost of Care
  • Patient Engagement
  • Capture Rate

At the core of his perspective is the simple idea that a practice can either lower costs or improve revenue. Yes, practices are a business and those 2 principles are at the core of every business. Unfortunately, the $36 billion of EHR incentive money caused so many people to throw these principles out the window while they chased a carrot. It’s time to get back to business (yes, healthcare is a business) and think about how EHR software can lower costs and improve revenue (Side note: look through the meaningful use requirements and see which ones helped with either of these goals).

My KPIs for organizations would have some similarities to Lester’s above, but I would frame them as: Improve Efficiency and Create Connections.

EHR software should make your practice more efficient. If it doesn’t, then you’re doing something wrong. However, don’t trust in your own perception calculus to decide if it makes you more efficient or not. Our perception gets easily swayed. Plus, we quickly forget how much time we wasted searching for paper charts, reading illegible paper charts, and playing phone tag with patients. All of these are efficiencies that every practice should be experiencing with their EHR. Create goals around making your practice more efficient. Your practice will love it and patients will love it too.

While technology gets a bad rap when it comes to disconnecting people, quite the opposite is possible. Technology can be used as a way to create much deeper connections with your patients. Whether it’s delivering lab results through a patient portal, text message and email reminders to patients, online appointment scheduling, secure text communication, etc. All of this can be done efficiently and scalably thanks to technology. The next generation of value based reimbursement will require this connection. Ensuring its in place will lead to more revenue for your organization as reimbursement continues to evolve.

Those are the two KPIs that I’d suggest for every healthcare organization. Once you’ve nailed these two areas down, there are plenty more to work on including plenty of other quality care initiatives. However, this will give your practice a good start and may even change your people’s perspective on their EHR investment.

Is the Concierge Model A Real Option for Providers?

Posted on February 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This article last month in Crain’s New York Business talks about the pressures that primary care doctors are facing and how those financial pressures are getting many of them to try cash-only or concierge practices. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

To stave off the pressures prompting many physicians to sell their practices to hospital systems, Manhattan internist Peter Bruno has tried a number of creative solutions. They have ranged from forming a now-disbanded group practice with 60 colleagues to his ongoing strategy of working at a nursing home one day a week to supplement his income in his current solo practice.

With reimbursements dropping, Dr. Bruno made the bold move in July of converting his six-employee private practice on East 59th Street in Manhattan to a hybrid concierge model. In concierge care, patients pay an annual fee or retainer to get more immediate, customized care. Hybrid practices treat both concierge and traditional patients. He worked with SignatureMD, a Santa Monica, Calif.-based network that assists physicians in doing so.

I don’t think we need to cover the financial realities of being a solo physician here. You’re all to aware of the challenges. However, I’m interested to hear what you think about the potential for the concierge model of medicine for primary care doctors? Is that an option for most primary care doctors?

I ask this because I’ve seen concierge medicine work in the rich areas (the above case is Manhattan for example), but I have yet to see it really work in poorer areas. If we’re shifting to concierge medicine, what does that mean for the poorer areas of the country?

Here in Las Vegas, they have an interesting hybrid model that they’re trying where concierge medicine is part of the insurance plan. In fact, it could be part of the insurance plan your employer provides. I just signed up for the plan, so we’ll see how it goes.

I’m also watching how the EHR market is adapting to this trend as well. Over on EMR and HIPAA I wrote an article titled “An EHR Focused On Customer Requests, Not MU” which talks about what an EHR would look like that was just focused on patient care and how Amazing Charts was offering that product.

Just today SRSsoft announced their new SRS Essentials product that’s a non-MU EHR as well. Although, they offer an interesting wrinkle that allows their SRS Essentials customers to move up to an meaningful use certified EHR should they decide they later want to take part in meaningful use (or whatever that program eventually becomes).

Of course, SRSsoft focuses mostly on the specialty market and not general medicine. Although, maybe this physician focused EHR product will be of interest to the emerging concierge and direct primary care doctors as well.

What do you think of these new models of medicine? What’s their place in the healthcare world? Where are they going in the future? Will their technology needs be different than other doctors?

EHR Blogger Attrition

Posted on May 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Someone at HIMSS asked me who the up and coming healthcare IT bloggers were in the industry. It was an interesting question. It’s not really sexy to start an EHR blog right now. The golden age of EHR blogging is over and I’m interested to know where EHR and healthcare IT blogging is going to go in the future. The good part is that the use of technology to improve healthcare is never going to go away. It may not be called EHR, but we’ll always be working with the latest technology that can make healthcare better.

As I look through the list of health IT and EHR bloggers on HITsphere, It’s really interesting to see how many bloggers have stopped blogging in the 8.5 years since I started.

Even more than dedicated health IT and EHR bloggers, we’ve seen a lot of company bloggers basically stop as well. For example, I miss seeing Evan Steele’s weekly posts on the EMR Straight Talk blog. Of course, he’s now moved on from the day to day of SRSsoft. I guess that’s a natural part of the cycle, but it’s too bad a company doesn’t continue on with the blog. (UPDATE: After Evan Steele posted a transition post and the people at SRSsoft have taken up and continued with regular blog posts from the new CEO and also many of their staff. I love when there’s a culture of blogging at a company. Nice work SRSsoft) Not that keeping a blog with fresh content is easy. It’s not.

There are still quite a few bloggers that started blogging about the same time as me and are still doing their thing. A few that come to mind include: Neil Versel, HIStalk, Healthcare IT Guy, Lab Soft News, and Christina’s Considerations.

That’s not to say that there aren’t still some great health IT blogs out there. There are still quite a few good ones, but not many new ones. Knowing that I’ll anger some people I don’t list (feel free to mention your blog in the comments and I’ll see about doing a future post with ones not listed here) here are a few of the ones I think do great work: Manage My Practice, Health System CIO, Chilmark Research, and HITECH Answers.

I just remembered this CDW list of Top 50 health IT blogs. It has some other good ones as well. Although, I might be bias since 8 of the 50 are part of Healthcare Scene. I’d love to hear what other blogs you read or places you go for great content.

Meaningful Use Dropout Rate At 17 Percent

Posted on July 2, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

In theory, once a provider achieves Meaningful Use and picks up their first check, one might think that they’re on board and ready to power through the program. Well, think again.

According to a piece published in HIT Consultant, 17 percent of providers who got an $18,000 EMR check in 2011 didn’t get the second $12,000 incentive payout in 2012.  The stats come from a recently published analysis of the federal April EMR attestation data crunched by Wells Fargo.

What that means, in real terms, is that 17 percent of providers were able to demonstrate MU for the 90 days required in 2011 but couldn’t keep things up for the full year required for to get the second check, notes Evan Steele, CEO of EMR firm SRSsoft, who authored the article.

You’d think that providers could have demonstrated a year’s compliance, given that after 90 days they already had the needed workflows in place to support those requirements, but for nearly 20 percent of providers, it seems that simply wasn’t the case, Steele says. And this is very bad news, he suggests:

A 17% loss rate in any business is wholly unacceptable, and this failure does not portend well for the future of the EHR Incentive Program. If $12,000 proved to be insufficient motivation for physicians with meaningful use experience to meet the relatively low requirements of Stage 1 on an ongoing basis, it would be foolish to expect physicians to muster the wherewithal to meet the increasingly demanding requirements of Stage 2. The incentive for a year’s performance at that point will be a mere $4,000.

Thinking that perhaps the 17 percent dropoff trend will correct itself as time passes?  Probably not. As Steele points out, another survey recently found that 14 percent of physicians who attested to Stage 1 already say that they don’t intent to attest to Stage 2.

As Steele sees it, this is evidence that we need to simplify Meaningful Use rather than making it increasingly complex, while focusing on interoperability across the entire healthcare system.  In his view, if we don’t “the entire program will go down the drain.”

I don’t know if these numbers are evidence that Meaningful Use is on the skids, but a 17 percent dropoff is certainly troubling. Clearly something must be done to reach out to providers who’ve climbed off the train.

How To Grill An EMR Vendor

Posted on June 4, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today I found a nice blog piece on how providers — largely medical practices, the blog’s core audience — can grill EMR vendors effectively prior to sinking their money into a product. I say “grill” because the questions will force vendors to put up or shut up on several levels, something a lot of non-techy doctors wouldn’t know how to do.

Here’s the five questions, courtesy of the EMR and EMR Insights blog (with a few comments on each):

When did your company start operations, and can I have 2 references from each year you have been in business?

I don’t know about you, folks, but assuming older companies will produce better results involves some significant risks too.  Sure, a high-flying venture-funded partner might go out of biz next week, and that would be pretty terrible. On the other hand, many companies grow less creative and less flexible over time, and take their customers for  granted — even if it’s not part of a doofus big vendor’s lineup.  What about: “Can I have five references for clients in my specialty?” and “Please sign this contract addendum which addresses how you’ll handle it if your product is discontinued or you close you doors.”

* How many developers are assigned to work on your core EHR product? Where do the developers reside?

I like the Q regarding the size of the development team, which can be  make-or-break factor in keeping your product updated and bug-patched.  But as for where the developers reside, again, that’s a toss-up.  You could hire a vendor with a large but poorly-managed development team, or a small vendor whose team is overseas — but well-managed and effective nonetheless.

* How was your product and company ranked in the Best in KLAS Awards — Software & Services Report – December 2011, and the KLAS Ambulatory EMR Specialty Report 2012?

Interesting. In theory asking about rankings is a good idea, unless you don’t respect the people doing the ranking. (I know my colleague John Lynn isn’t a raving KLAS fan.)  I suppose rankings like these can be a touchstone, but they probably shouldn’t be a primary factor in EMR investment decisions.

* Do you have a whitepaper that explains your interoperability platform?

Definitely a good question, but the answer is probably over the heads of many clinicians and office managers making the EMR call. If a medical practice has someone on staff who’s geeky, or an IT consultant is on your selection team, sure, get the whitepaper. Otherwise, I believe medical practices would do better simply studying the literature and asking for a thorough, plain-language presentation explaining these features.

* What are your specific plans for meeting all the Meaningful Use requirements of Stages 2 and 3?

What can I say but yes, yes and more yes. A company that can’t answer this question should be toast.

One final note.  How about throwing in “If I can’t get to Meaningful Use within x days, do I get my money back?”  Seeing how your vendor reacts should be, um, educational.

Do Privately-Owned EMR Vendors Offer Better Customer Care?

Posted on February 14, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

When a company like Greenway Medical Technologies (NASDAQ: GWAY) goes public, most of the post-IPO talk centers on what its leaders will do with the money.

Ideally, the newly-rich EMR vendor will do customer-friendly stuff like improving their product and strengthening their technical support organization. In reality, though, public companies have a different focus; their job is keeping the Wall Street folks who own their shares happy.

Since happy largely means only one thing — increasing profits and earnings per share — that vendor isn’t likely to take on new expenses. No, it’s more likely to find ways to charge more and sell more, rather than doing a better job of showing love to its existing customers.

SRSsoft’s Evan Steele has shared a nice analysis of  how KLAS customer support ratings (for companies serving the 6 to 25 physician practice) compare with the vendor’s financial status.  While they’re not exactly scientific, Steele’s conclusions are still striking; he concludes that five of the top six vendors are privately owned.

Now, I’m not sure how that correlates with another KLAS data point, in which publicly-held EMR/practice management vendor athenahealth (NASDAQ: ATHN) was named as top-ranked provider for its cloud-based EHR in December. Its stock has also been on a generally upward climb for the past 12 months, ranging from $39.87 to $72.70 per share.

Is it possible athena is managing to please both its customers and its investors? Well, if the typically nasty gossip you see on athena’s discussion board is any indication, no. It looks like grouchy insiders are shorting the stock, which some expect to plunge below its starting price to $30/share or so fairly soon.

That being said, one particularly intriguing comment suggests that Cerner (NASDAQ: CERN) is eyeballing athena, which observers think would be a good fit.

Cerner fits the profile I’ve outlined: it’s huge, profitable and what’s more, in need of a product to fill the physician niche it doesn’t own. If you think Cerner could just build its own physician presence, look at GE’s decision to drop doctor-oriented Centricity Advance. Clearly getting doctors to buy was  much harder than it looked at first glance.

Cerner doesn’t need athena to build its margins: analysts expect it to see sales growth of 13+ percent this year, to $2.5 billion or so. It should also see earnings growth of 22+ percent to $2.25 per share.

Buying athena would give Cerner a critical medical practice presence, and at the same time, let athena keep its customers happy without forcing it to play only for a Wall Street audience. In this situation, at least, maybe an EMR vendor can have its cash and eat it too.

Sandhills Paves the Way for Successful Pediatric EMR Implementations

Posted on October 13, 2011 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

On my far-too-frequent visits to my younger daughter’s pediatrician, I’ve noticed pristine new monitors and keyboards wrapped up and sitting in the corner of the exam rooms. Over the last six months, there they’ve sat, waiting patiently to be unwrapped and plugged in. “What’s the hold up,” I think? As a parent, I’m hoping this new system will offer the doctors e-prescribing capabilities. As a healthcare IT observer, I’m wondering why what I presume to be an electronic health record (EHR) is taking so long to come out of the box and into operation. Is it a question of resources? Is the facility waiting for a training team to be made available? Is there back-end infrastructure that has yet to be put in place? These are the things I think about while dealing with low-grade fevers and scheduled immunizations.

Needless to say, my interest is always piqued when I come across stories of pediatricians adopting EHRs and/or realizing the benefits of that technology. So when I came across news that Sandhills Pediatrics had received $184,000 in EHR incentives, I was intrigued. The Columbia, S.C.-based practice has been using an EHR from SRS since 2010.

“Even our initially most skeptical physicians became committed SRS EHR users in a very short period of time,” said Kevin O. Wessinger, M.D., president of Sandhills Pediatrics, in the release announcing the pay out. “All fourteen physicians and their staff value the efficiencies that SRS has delivered and the patient care and practice improvements that SRS has facilitated.”

I recently spoke with SRS CEO Evan Steele to learn more about how Sandhills implemented the EMR back in 2010, and the benefits they’ve realized from it.

This being the practice’s first EHR, what prompted them to make the move from paper to digital?
ES: “The driving force was the quality of care Sandhills was providing. With 4 locations and Saturday and Sunday office hours only at the central location, patient chart review was a big challenge. The patient charts that were housed at the satellite offices, because that’s where the patients were normally seen, and so were not available to review for weekend care. Additionally, the practice provides nurse triage in the evenings until 10:00pm and again, the satellite patients’ charts were not available.”

Did you, as the vendor, encounter any barriers to adoption from the Sandhills staff?
“No, we did not encounter any barriers to adoption. Our implementation plan is highly developed and assures 100% adoption. In addition, the Sandhills team’s dedication to success allowed them to achieve their EHR goals. Furthermore, the decision to implement the SRS EHR was driven from the top down. Sometimes the age of the physicians may impact adoptability. At Sandhills, 12 of the 14 physicians are under the age of 50 so they are more computer-savvy and willing to make the change.”

What sort of “extras” do the pediatric practices look for when selecting an EMR?
“Unique to pediatrics are immunizations. The SRS development staff worked closely with Sandhills on immunizations and pediatric growth charts. SRS secured the integration between Sandhills and the World Health Organization, developed a table for displaying and storing vaccine information, and enabled Sandhills to provide this information to their patients in a usable format.

“With a patient population of 57,000, Sandhills had to provide every kindergarten, grade school, and day care with proof of immunization. In the past, the practice had to hand-write 20,000 immunization certificates each year. SRS was readily available to provide a solution to this issue and saved the Sandhills staff many hours of aggravation. SRS created a form that auto-populates the immunization information so now the Sandhills staff no longer needs to hand-write each certificate.

The same process and benefits were developed for growth charts. The SRS EHR provides the patient’s age, and the Sandhills staff only has to enter height and weight, and this information auto-populates on the growth charts.

SRS created efficiencies, which coupled with our uniqueness in allowing physicians to continue to document notes as they are accustomed, has led to a successful implementation and positive EHR experience.”

How have clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction been improved since the EMR was installed?
“Clinical outcomes have improved as the physicians have access to pertinent clinical data at any time from any place. Additionally, the staff is quicker to respond to patient inquiries. They’ve experienced tremendous improvements in efficiencies and patient outcomes as a direct result of using SRS Order Management. Sandhills used to have manual paper tracking of lab tests and now with the SRS EHR, an expected date pops up in the system and if a test is not back by then, an alert is shown calling attention to the fact that it needs to be addressed.

“The patients, especially those seen on the weekends and evenings, have commented that they appreciate the improved and quick service. When they call in to the office with questions and concerns, they are comforted and given peace of mind knowing that the Sandhills’ staff is completely familiar and up-to-date with their situation.”

What do you think will be the next evolution of EHRs for pediatrics?
SRS Development recently unveiled vaccine inventory control. This process is entirely manual now, but the new enhancements will automatically track down the vaccine to the lot number. It’s also a double-check for safety that the lot numbers they have match what’s in computer. This is a double benefit – quality control and inventory control. This new development will especially find favor with the nurses, who are so happy that a daily occurrence that used to take 2 hours will now take 2 minutes.”

More On EHR Usability: Let Doctors Decide

Posted on July 3, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Here’s worthwhile some observations on how to drive improvements in EHR usability from Evan Steele, CEO of EMR, practice management and PACS systems vendor SRSSoft.  (Just for clarity, SRSSoft serves medical practices.)

While Mr. Steele’s comments may not be wildly original, I always like to see discussions of tricky issues like usability boiled down to a few key points, and he’s done a good job here. His arguments, with my commentary:

* Feedback from physicians and other providers should drive EMR usability improvements.

Of course — shouldn’t the software clinicians work every day with to improve health and save lives be adapted to fit the needs of those clinicians? You can’t offer complete freedom when you’re collecting structured data, but clinicians should be able to bend and stretch things as much as possible.

That of course, begs the question of what’s driving usability models right now, doesn’t it?  Certainly, EMR vendors care what clinicians think, but my guess is that the development roadmap has to come first far too often.

Here, let’s pretend I’ve inserted a lengthy rant as to how enterprise software companies in general just don’t connect well with their customers  — something that became painfully obvious to me when I worked for one several years ago. Suffice it to say that I doubt clinicians are as involved in vendors’ UI dev, much less feature set specs, as often as they should be.

* Usability measures should embrace not only primary care, but also specialists.

Again, this seems fairly obvious to me, but seemingly, not to federal officials, who, according to Steele, treated specialty needs as an “afterthought” when creating Meaningful Use standards.

In my opinion, it’s become fairly clear that specialty-facing systems are important, and that regulators should address such systems on their own terms. I’ve seen no sign that they’ve developed plans to do so as of yet, though. (Anyone know more than I do on this?)

* Usability shouldn’t be legislated.

For at least a couple of years, there’s been talk of the FDA’s stepping in and imposing usability rules on EMRs; observers say the rules would be akin to those they already do on medical devices and supporting software. (See more on this issue from medical device connectivity expert Tim Gee here.)

Steele, for his part, thinks such regulations would cause problems. Imposing governmental standards on EHR interface “will inevitably accommodate only a narrow range of users, leaving those with varying preferences and workflows without software to satisfy their usability requirements,” he argues.

I’d like to see Steele get his way on the first two suggestions. If EMR interfaces are driven by clinicians and take specialists into account, it’s far less likely that the government will feel obliged to impose itself upon the marketplace.

But if the industry doesn’t do a better job of partnering with clinicians, expect to see the FDA or other agencies step in.  Regulators may decide that if the industry can’t produce usable EMRs on its own, predictable, rulebound ones will do.

EMR Integration with PACS Software

Posted on September 14, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I got the announcement from SRSsoft that they have integrated their EMR software with the Medstrat PACS software. As I think about it, I’m a little surprised that I haven’t seen more integrations with PACS software. Is this because most doctors wouldn’t really use this? I know that SRSsoft does a lot of work with orthopedics and related specialties where PACS is essential. I’d love to hear what other things are happening with PACS and EMR integration.