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Treating a Healthy Patient

Posted on November 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I first coined the concept of what I call treating a healthy patient back in 2011. I’ve always loved the concept of a doctor actually treating someone who thinks and feels completely healthy. The challenge is that this type of relationship is very different than what we have in our current health system today.

While our current model is very different, I’m hearing more and more things that get me back to healthcare treating an otherwise healthy patient. Although, someone recently pointed out to me that we’re not really treating a healthy patient, because we’re all sick. We just each have different degrees of sickness. It’s a fine point, but I still argue we’re “healthy” because we feel “healthy.”

This analysis points out one layer of change that I see happening in healthcare. This change is being able to detect and predict sickness. Yes, that still means a doctor is treating a sickness. However, I see a wave of new sensors, genetics, and other technology that’s going to absolutely change what we define as “sick.”

This is a massive change and one that I think is very good. I recently read an article by Joseph Kvedar which commented that we’re very likely to seek medical help when we break our arm, because the pain is a powerful motivating factor to get some help. Can this new wave of sensors and technology help us know the “pain” our bodies are suffering through and thus inspire us to seek medical attention? I think they will do just that.

The problem is that our current health system isn’t ready to receive a patient like this. Doctors are going to have to continue to evolve in what they consider a “disease” and the treatment they provide. Plus, we’ll likely have to include many other professionals in the treatment of patients. Do we really want our highly paid doctors training on exercise and nutrition when they’ve had almost no training in medical school on the subjects? Of course, not. We want the dietitian doing this. We’ll need to go towards a more team based approach to care.

I’ve regularly said, “Treating a healthy patient is more akin to social work than it is medicine.” Our health system is going to have to take this into consideration and change accordingly.

Treating a healthy patient won’t solve all our healthcare problems. In fact, I’ve wondered if in some ways treating a healthy patient isn’t just shifting the costs as opposed to lowering the costs. Regardless of the cost impact, this is where I see healthcare heading. Yes, we’ll still need many doctors to do important procedures. Just because you detect possible heart issues doesn’t mean that patient won’t eventually need a heart bypass surgery some day. In fact, a whole new set of medical procedures will likely be created that treat possible heart issues before they become straight up heart issues.

What other ways do you see the system moving towards or away from “treating healthy patients”?

Ideas, Insights and Predictions from Healthcare Social Media Thought Leaders

Posted on July 16, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought it would be fun to experiment with a new type of blog post. I came up with the idea during the recent #HITsm chat. I decided I’d ask 5 of the #HITsm participants to share an idea, prediction, insight, or thought that I could share in a blog post. I didn’t give them a topic, direction, or ask any questions. I just asked them to share something that thought would be useful or interesting. I found the results quite interesting.

I asked 5 people to tweet something. Only 4 of the 5 responded (probably a lost Twitter DM), but one of the people sent two tweets. So, the following are the 5 tweets with a little bit of commentary from me.


This is a really interesting insight. Chad has a really good point. I’m not sure I’ve seen a truly open HIE that just wanted to be the company sharing the data. I think a few have that goal in mind, but they haven’t gotten there yet. It will be a real game changer when an HIE just wants to be the pipes and not the faucet as well. I will say that most healthcare organizations aren’t quite ready to implement the faucet though either.


Thank you Dr. Nan for bringing some humor to the post. I love it! Although, maybe it’s not that funny since it rings far too close to the truth. I might also share this with my wife so she understands age appropriate behavior for our children.


This was the other tweet that Dr. Nan sent. You can tell it comes from a raw place. I’m actually surprised we don’t talk about doctor depression more. I read a lot of entrepreneur blogs and there’s been a real increase in discussion around entrepreneur depression. I expect that doctors could really benefit from this discussion as well. For some reason there’s a fear of discussing the real challenges and pressures of the job.


Would we expect anything other than workflow from Dr. Webster? I’m not sure I like his prediction. I hope he’s wrong. I don’t want a workaround for EHR workflow. I want something drastically different.


I love this concept and refer to it as treating healthy patients. Although, I love Ryan’s approach of patients taking responsibility for their own health and engaging with those they love in health-generating behaviors. Sure, doctors are miracle workers, but we as patients should be much more involved in our health as well.

That’s all she wrote. If you like this idea, let me know. If you’d like to participate in a future post, be sure to tweet me @ehrandhit.

We Know What’s Right, but It’s Hard

Posted on August 24, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In perusing various blogs, I came across Matthew Gibson, MD’s blog and this really compelling article titled, “It’s So Easy, and Yet…” Here’s one especially poignant section:

What I see day in and day out is complications of simple, easy to manage problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, etc. These are things that we KNOW how to treat. We know how to prevent complications. And yet, I just had a man last week who required half of his foot to be amputated as a complication of untreated diabetes. I had a woman this week who came in seeing snakes on people’s clothing, because her blood pressure was so high it was affecting her mind. Last month, I saw a man who had large amounts of yeast growing in his mouth and groin because his blood sugar (and thus urinary sugar) was so high.

This morning, I’m caring for a truly pleasant gentleman with COPD (bad chronic lung disease usually caused by smoking). He hasn’t smoked in the last 15 years, but he smoked quite heavily before that. Even though he’s been doing things all right as far as his lungs are concerned for the last 15 years, he has to live with the consequences of his actions prior to that. For the last several days, I’ve seen him decompensate and gasp for air, feeling like he’s drowning, because he can’t get the air to move through his lungs like he should. How did this kind old man get to this point?

At the core of his comments is the idea of how do we motivate ourselves to do something we know we should be doing. This is a really hard question to answer and something we probably will never solve completely. However, I think there’s plenty of room to improve even if we never become perfect at it.

Over on Smart Phone Healthcare we’ve spent a lot of time reviewing various mobile health applications. I’d say that the large majority of mHealth applications are about trying to help solve this problem. Plus, I think the mobile device connected with good data about ourselves is one method that will help us be healthier.

Related to this idea, is what I’ve called treating healthy patients. This is a concept that won’t leave me since I think it will be a fundamental part of the future of healthcare. I believe we’re on the brink of a series of devices and technology that will help us monitor our bodies in such a way that we can identify sickness within us before we feel sick. This information won’t make everyone change their behaviors, but it will help many.

We’re in the very early stages of monitoring our bodies and connecting all that data with action. However, it’s exciting to see that now many of these things are possible thanks to powerful computing and a new generation of devices.