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Independent Clinical Archive Brings Complete Patient Record Together in One Place

Posted on October 27, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Tim Kaschinske, Senior Product Manager, North America, BridgeHead Software.

How many photos and documents do you have stored on your home computer or in the cloud? How easily would it be to find those photos of, say, the family beach vacation you took in 2010? What about the trip in 2001? Most of us would have to search blindly through scores of electronic file folders and myriad devices before finding what we need.

Now think about your physicians who need to access historical patient information, such as baseline mammograms, medication history, lab results or the course of a patient’s cancer treatment. Nearly every hospital is on its second or third EMR, and any new EMR vendor wants as little previous data to come over from legacy systems as possible to help ensure a “clean” install. So that leaves physicians and assistants poring through older EMRs, or other applications and media to find needed data. This takes time away from direct patient care, an increasingly critical consideration in value-based care arrangements.

But that older information still has value, for both patient care as well as for regulatory reasons. The problem, then, is how to store, protect and share that information in a way it remains readily accessible, available and readable even as technology changes.

Disparate data, common archive

The answer is an independent clinical archive (ICA) that can accept disparate data from multiple systems such as an EMR or a PACS and store it using open data standards commonly found in healthcare. An ICA does not replace an EMR or a PACS – it works in concert with them, allowing a hospital to formally retire previous EMRs, PACS and other IT systems while ensuring the electronic patient data contained within lives on as part of the 360-degree patient view. This saves money on licensing fees, storage costs and IT personnel costs to maintain and update rarely used technology.

An ICA is a centralized, standards-based data repository that ingests disparate data types such as DICOM images, HL7 reports, physician notes and other unstructured data. Information is managed based on unique patient information and further subdivided by specialty or date, for example. The ICA works best when integrated with a hospital’s EMR (via an application programming interface (API)), allowing providers to seamlessly compile a complete, longitudinal patient record without having to remember additional log-ins.

APIs are also used to connect to multiple legacy systems. However, security protocols on legacy systems are not as stringent as they are with newer technology, leaving hospitals potentially vulnerable to accidental or intentional data breaches. A hospital using an ICA as a central data repository only requires APIs among the ICA, the EMR and the PACS. Plus, the ICA has built-in security and protection features to ensure the safeguarding of critical patient data.

A true, 360-degree patient view

When an ICA is properly implemented, providers access the information being populated from the EMR and the information coming from the ICA through one system and in the appropriate context for the patient. And that’s the holy grail of patient information: one environment aggregating all of the information outlining chronic conditions, physician notes, medications, diagnoses, surgeries and much more.

And if a physician needs to drill down into radiology reports, for instance, he can pull up just that data. Finding information about a specific hospitalization is as easy as inputting the correct date range to locate just those records.

While Software-as-a-Service revolutionized the delivery of IT services, an ICA can revolutionize the way physicians find all of the data they need, quickly and within their normal workflows. At the same time, hospitals can save money and increase data security by retiring older electronic systems.

A List of Key Insights for EHR Data Conversion

Posted on December 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene sat down with Sean West, VP of Data Conversion at HealthPort, to discuss EHR data conversion. EHR data conversion is quickly becoming a hot topic for many organizations that rushed their initial EHR selection and implementation. In our video discussion embedded below, Sean West offers a number of key insights including the following:

  • Convert the Data Close to the EHR Conversion
  • Ensure You Have Enough Time to Make the Conversion
  • Consider How Much Data Needs to Be Converted
  • Look at the Impact on Performance of Converting All EHR Data
  • Evaluate Your Legacy EHR Vendors Willingness to Work with You on Data Conversion

Check out the following video for all the details:

We also asked Sean West about when an organization would want to consider a vendor neutral archive for their EHR. While the vendor neutral archive is incredibly popular with PACS systems, we’re just now starting to see the idea crop up with EHR data. In the following video, Sean West provides some good insight into when an organization might want to consider a vendor neutral archive for their EHR data.

A Private HIE is a Vendor Neutral Archive Applied to EHR

Posted on June 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been really fascinated by the work many hospital systems are doing to create a private HIE in their organization. As I wrote, I think that private HIE could lead to a nationwide HIE. It’s still a bit of a long shot, but I think it has more promise than the other HIE initiatives I’ve seen in action.

Along with my interest in private HIEs, I’ve also been fascinated by the switch to Vendor Neutral Archives (VNA) in the radiology space. In a VNA, you can store any medical image in the archive and it doesn’t matter what device you use to capture or view the image. Think about the flexibility that this provides. You’re no longer locked into a certain piece of imaging equipment or to a certain viewing application. Instead, you can switch as needed.

As I consider these two areas, it seems that a private HIE is the first step to having a vendor neutral archive. In fact, I’m not sure why more people haven’t applied the principles of vendor neutral archives to the EHR world. I imagine the challenge is in the complexity of the data. Sure, DICOM isn’t a simple piece of data either, but at least there are some DICOM standards that most medical imaging companies follow. The same can’t be said in the EHR world.

The problem now is that the term HIE has so much failure associated with it. I imagine that’s why we moved from RHIO to HIE as well. However, I think that the change from creating an HIE to a vendor neutral archive for EHR data would be a dramatic shift in thinking. This could be an important decision for a large hospital system. Instead of just trying to share data from EHR to EHR, what if they created a vendor neutral archive of all their EHR data such that your future EHR was built around that VNA instead of around a specific piece of software. I’m not sure there are many hospital CIOs brave enough to look this far out.

What do you think of the VNA concept applied to EHR? Is a private HIE the start of a VNA for EHR?