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Forrester’s Take On Computing Trends For Next Year

Posted on December 31, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Recently, Forrester Research’s J.P. Gownder released a list of six broad tech trends he feels will dominate 2014. While they’re not healthcare-specific, I thought our readers would appreciate them, as they are relevant to the work that we do.

Mobility:  Gownder is arguing that this year coming will see a “sustained mobile mind shift.” He argues that customers and employees are beginning to expect that the data they touch will be available to them in context on any device at the exact what would’ve need. He argues that customers will actively shun businesses that lack mobile applications.

Fragmentation:  While vendors would like to see us, as consumers, stick to one vendor and operating system, Gownder argues that just the opposite will happen in 2014, with people trading off between multiple devices and thriving across operating systems. This movement, driven by the seeming infinity of new mobile devices, makes things more difficult for health IT administrators, to be certain.

Wearables:  While the wearables devices your editor has seen strike her mostly as toys, Gownder is far more enthusiastic. He argues that next year will see commercial availability of a range of once theoretical wearables — and that enterprise wearables have a particularly rich future ahead of them.

Intelligent assistants:  For me, services like Siri and Samsung’s S-Voice are entertaining, but hardly add anything to the mix when it comes to what your phone tablet or PC can do. Gownder, however, believes that intelligent assistance will rise to prominence in 2014 as they become more sophisticated, interesting and useful.

Gestural computing: Expect to see new applications and scenarios for gestural computing this year, Gownder predicts, driven by phenomena like the presence of XBox Kinect in tens of millions of homes, the emergence of Leap Motion and the emergence of a new device known as Myo from Thalmic Labs. In this case he isolates healthcare specifically as a strong use case, in which professionals manipulate and navigate medical imaging using gestures.

Stores recognize you: Here’s one I can see direct healthcare applications for; next year, Gownder predicts, will be the year in which you walk into a store and the store “recognizes you” and tailors your experience accordingly. I can see this being relevant in virtually any public-facing healthcare setting, including the ED, medical clinics and perhaps even EMT settings. Sounds very much like John’s description of a “biometrically controlled healthcare system.

So which of these trends do you think will be the most important next year? How are you adopting them, if at all, in your healthcare organization?

Patient Accountability and Responsibility

Posted on February 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think you can add this post to my series of posts on the Physician Revolt that I talked about earlier. The following message is from a doctor who emailed me. Obviously, they didn’t realize it would be published, so ignore some of the grammar errors, but the message is a good one that we should be discussing.

The doctors are going to be graded on the health outcomes but yet patients are going to do whatever. Nowhere in the law it states that patient is responsible for anything.

So while the ACOs are going to offer coverage…… there is going to be no immediate access due to shortage of MDs and the current MDs whose slots are overfilled are going to be dinged with penalties for not taking care of their patients completely (ie. all time coverage for all patients all the time). which means the MD has to refund the already reduced reimbursements back to the government because patients will complain about this.

Of course, the patients themselves will not tighten their belt and become personally responsible for their health so that they take up less appointment slots……..

So the significant question is Where are the patients held accountable in all these free health care reforms?

This is an important question as we shift to an ACO model. I think the above narrative places a little too much blame on the patient for the higher healthcare costs. Certainly there are things that doctors and our health system can do to lower costs that are outside of the patient. A simple example is 2 doctors ordering duplicate tests. If they just transferred the data, they’d provide the same care for a much lower cost. Plus, I think there are ways that a doctor together with a clinical care team can improve the overall quality of care of a patient population regardless of the patient’s choices. Another example of this is the hospital to PCP hand off. Doing this right can lower healthcare costs by reducing hospital readmissions.

While much can be done by doctors and the healthcare system as a whole, the doctor does raise a good question about patient responsibility. In what ways could we incentivize patients to take some accountability and responsibility for their healthcare as well?

The first thing that popped in my head was the way car insurance companies are doing it. One of the insurance companies is tapping into your car’s computer to monitor safe driving and then they provide discounts to you for being a safe driver. Are we going to have the same models in healthcare? In some ways we do, since if you’re a non-smoker your health insurance costs a lot less. Will health insurance companies start lowering a patient’s health insurance costs based on data from a wearable device that monitors your activity?

I’m honestly not sure how it’s all going to play out, but I am sure that healthcare IT is going to play a role in the process. We’ll never totally solve the issue of patient responsibility and accountability. That’s a feature of life, but I think that technology can help to hold us all more accountable for our health choices. What technologies do you see helping this?