Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

ZocDoc’s Company Culture – What’s Been Your Experience?

Posted on August 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Company culture has been in the tech news lately after this lengthy article looking at Amazon’s company culture. However, in the healthcare IT world, I was more interested in this recent article by Business Insider looking at ZocDoc’s company culture. The article paints a brutal picture of a “frat house” mentality together with sexism and drugs. Not a pretty picture and it pains me to even read stories like this. However, this part of the article really stuck out for me:

On the sales floor at ZocDoc, employees say there’s a phrase used over and over again: “churn and burn.” Former employees say this phrase indicates the competitive, often stressful nature of work in ZocDoc’s sales division.

“They are full steam ahead,” one former salesperson told Business Insider. “They have this arrogance in the company where the human capital is of zero value.”

A former employee at ZocDoc told Business Insider that employee turnover at the company is high. The company recruits and brings in batches of new employees regularly because so many end up leaving or quitting, the employee alleges.

I definitely know very little about ZocDoc’s company culture. I do know that they raised a lot of money, very quickly. That puts a lot of pressure on your company. First, you have to hire a lot of people over a very short period of time. That doesn’t leave much time to develop a quality company culture. Second, when you raise that much money, you face enormous pressure to scale the company and deliver results. That’s not an excuse for bad behavior (assuming the Business Insider report is accurate), but it could explain how their company culture got out of control.

Company culture aside, their description of their sales organization mimics what I’ve heard from a number of doctors about ZocDoc. I’ve only ever met one doctor who liked ZocDoc. That doctor felt that he got patients he wouldn’t have otherwise gotten and so it was worth it. Every other doctor I’ve talked to said that ZocDoc charged way too much for new patient referrals and so they didn’t use them.

Outside of doctors’ views on ZocDoc’s pricing model, some doctors told me how aggressive the ZocDoc sales people were with them. They’d tell me about being contacted all the time by their sales people. I remember one practice manager telling me that they would never do business with ZocDoc since they hated their sales approach. The practice manager didn’t talk about the ZocDoc product or service at all. The sales person had ruined ZocDoc with that practice.

After hearing so many practices talk about ZocDoc over the years, it resonated with me when the former salesperson described the “arrogance in the company.” That’s the impression I’d been given by the many practices I’d talk to myself. I’m sure the $97.9 million they’d raised in funding (and reports said they’re raising another $152 million) helped perpetuate that culture.

What’s been your experience working with ZocDoc? I’d love to hear from more doctors and practice managers.

#eHealth100, Single EMR, EMR Adoption, and Wrong EMR Decision

Posted on December 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You know what time it is if the post begins with a hashtag. That’s right. We’re taking a quick look at some of the interesting, insightful, fun, entertaining, beautiful or otherwise thought provoking tweets related to EMR and EHR.

We’ll lead off with a tweet nomination to the #eHealth100:


Yes, I was happy that Anneliz thought of me with this tweet nomination. Although, I must admit that I wasn’t sure what I was being nominated for, so I asked and got the following response about the goal of the #eHealth100


I appreciate being mentioned in this group. Considering the many people that make up the healthcare world, I just hope that each day I can make a small difference in people’s lives. It’s a beautiful thing when I can do that and provide for my family at the same time.


I love and hate the sarcasm in Dr. May’s tweet. I love the irony, but hate that it seems to be a major medical breakthrough.


I’m always looking for more numbers on EMR adoption. Although, then I realized that the article is from Venture Beat. Unfortunately, the people at Venture Beat don’t follow healthcare IT and especially EHR very well (they do follow other startups well). This can be seen in their reference to ZocDoc and Castlight as EHR companies likely to go public. They might go public, but they are definitely not EHR companies. I also love that they also have a quote saying that 90% of doctors don’t have an EMR which totally contradicts the CDC EMR adoption numbers they put at the beginning.

The long story short: 1. Don’t read Venture Beat for healthcare IT info. 2. We don’t really know how we’re doing with EHR adoption. We just know EHR adoption is on the rise.


I’ve sadly been predicting major EMR switching for a year or more. There are a number of reasons for this, but I’d say the biggest driver of EMR switching is thanks to the EHR incentive money and meaningful use.