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Cerner Meaningful Use Incentives Total $2.2+ Million

Posted on August 31, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, some of the numbers for users of the Cerner certified EHR (ambulatory clients) came across my desk and since I’m a number lover, I thought I’d share.

Cerner Ambulatory clients have secured $2.2+ million in combined Medicare and Medicaid Meaningful Use incentive funds from 16 states. More than $1.5 million of that $2.2+ million is in Medicare EHR incentives.

More than 115 Cerner Physicians have successfully attested to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) EHR incentive program.

Looks like Cerner is planning to use @Cernerphysician and the Cerner Facebook page to publish updates like this in the future.

Now I must admit that I’m interested to know the Cerner EHR Stimulus numbers for the acute care settings.

If you know of other EHR vendors that have released their numbers, let me know and I’ll publish them in a future post.

Hurricane Irene Highlights Life-Saving Potential of Mobile EMRs

Posted on I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Watching the East Coast prepare for Hurricane Irene last weekend had me flashing back to the aftermath of the tornadoes that hit Joplin, Missouri, earlier this year. Would hospitals suffer the same levels of destruction that St. John’s Regional Medical Center did? Would they be as successful in evacuating patients and treating them off-site with limited supplies and infrastructure?

Fortunately, lessons learned from providers in Joplin, and to a greater extent from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, enabled providers along the East Coast to implement well thought-out disaster preparedness plans at their facilities. Mother Nature also lent a hand by withholding from Hurricane Irene the extreme conditions her predecessor unleashed on the South some six years ago.

The team at North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System makes a compelling case study for the smoothness with which detailed planning can bring to hospital evacuation scenarios. The short video below gives a glimpse into the efforts the hospital’s staff put forth to evacuate 252 in-patients and 50 emergency department patients in less than 24 hours. The helpful Mr. HISTalk has compiled a brief list of updates on several additional hospitals affected by the storm (scroll down to the bottom of the post for updates).

It was by pure coincidence that news of e-MDs’ launch of its Rounds® mobile EMR app for the iPhone reached my desk just as Hurricane Irene was closing in on land. The new app enables physicians to remotely and securely key in patient information from their EHRs via their mobile device – surely a tool that physicians would find useful in treating patients during an evacuation process such as that undertaken by North Shore-LIJ.

Patrick Hall, Executive Vice President of Business Development at e-MDs, told me that the mobile health solution was launched “to help our physician clients stay connected to patient information. We have observed that [they] have been dealing with more and more work when they are away from the office. This provides them with a convenient tool to deal with some of this, using an easily carried device that gives them access to complete patient information so they can make informed decisions about patient care.”

I’ll be interested to learn if any hospitals or private practice physicians came away with “success” stories because of their mobile EMR solutions. I think we can all breathe a sigh of relief that successes this time around far outnumber the failures.

Future of EHR and the Human Genome

Posted on August 30, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. West has a really interesting post up over on Happy EMR Doctor about EMR Software and the Human Genome. In the post he talks about a new program to help integrate EHR software with genome data. It’s a 4 year project, but I believe is the start of something groundbreaking.

It’s become quite clear to me over the past year that the EHRs of the future will be far more than patient records as recorded by the doctor. Instead, the EHR of the future will include a whole bunch of outside data that is collected by the patient.

Yesterday, we briefly discussed health-logging and that will be a major source of data that doctors can use to treat patients. However, probably even more powerful could be tying EHR software to a person’s genome data.

Once we understand the genome, we will likely be able to treat patients more effectively. We will be able to diagnose patients with more precision. We will be able to treat future issues before they become issues. Imagine if you could prescribe a drug that was unique to that person’s genome. Pretty cool stuff.

We are a long way from this happening, but I can clearly see that it’s the future of healthcare and the best way to leverage the genomic data is to tie it with the EHR and its clinical decision support system.

Unless someone thinks it might be better to have patients bring in their genome data on paper. Oh wait, last I checked you couldn’t do genomic tracking on paper.

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 51-55

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for the next entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

55 Discover how easy it is to interface to the EMR.
One good indication of how easy an EMR system is to interface is to look at how many companies they interface with. Another is to talk with other users of that EMR that have had to have an interface created with said EMR. As I mentioned in a recent comment response, just because they say they “can” or “could” do an interface doesn’t mean that they actually will. Add interface requirements in your contract if they’re needed. Be sure to include the expenses related to the interface in there as well.

54. Make sure to understand the licensing model
There are a lot of ways for an EHR vendor to make you pay. So, be sure you’re aware of all the expenses related to buying and implementing an EHR. Instead of recounting all the possible EHR costs here, I’m just going to link you to my pretty comprehensive list of unexpected EHR costs. Going through that list will help make sure you know what you’re getting into cost wise. You can be sure the EHR salesperson won’t be giving you this list.

53. Does your product handle billing?
Many people love the integrated billing in an EHR. Some can get away without it, but most people I know prefer some billing component as part of the EHR.

52. How is licensing managed?
While related to #54, I see this EHR tip as understanding when and how they’ll charge for licenses. Do you have to buy a whole group of licenses which you may or may not use or can you add licenses later as you grow your practice? As Shawn suggests in this tip, it’s best if you can do “just in time licensing.”

51. Make certain you know what upgrades for license expansions cost
Understand the costs related to expanding into a new line of service. Do you have all the modules you need? What’s the cost to add new modules? Will your server support that new module?

If you want to see my analysis of the other 101 EMR and EHR tips, I’ll be updating this page with my 101 EMR and EHR tips analysis. So, click on that link to see the other EMR tips.

EMRs and the Human Genome

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Did you know that the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is now funding grants to study how genomic information can be used along with electronic medical records?  The idea is to make it possible to have an impact on patients’ healthcare outcomes by integrating genome data with what health conditions and symptoms they have — all within the next four years.

“Our goal is to connect genomic information to high quality data in electronic medical records during the clinical care of patients. This will help us identify the genetic contributions to disease,” said NHGRI director Eric Green in a press release. “We can then equip health care workers everywhere with the information and tools that they need to apply genomic knowledge to patient care.”

So far, a pilot experiment to provide proof of principal for the research program (called eMERGE), showed that it is possible to link genetic information with complex disease states or conditions such as dementia, cataracts, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, peripheral arterial disease, white blood cell count, type 2 diabetes and heart conduction defects.

The investigators will now attempt to link genetic variations with more disease characteristics and symptoms, using genome-wide association studies (i.e. GWAS) across the entire eMERGE network.  Around 32,000 patients will be involved, and the ultimate goal would be to use the information found by linking genomic and EHR data to provide guidance for interventions such as adjusting patient medications or scheduling procedures that may ultimately help patients receive better care.  Imagine developing best practices for genetic disorders, all courtesy of your friendly neighborhood EMR/EHR!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.


 

 

 

Data Security in the Age of Self-logged Health

Posted on August 29, 2011 I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now enjoys writing about healthcare, science and technology.

Over at EMR and EHR I have a post going about the self-logging trend, in which people log their medical and other observations on a regular basis. I’m fascinated by the trend, but as an IT person, I shudder at the data nightmares this movement will leash if it becomes widespread.

Quantified Self, a major web hub for self-trackers, has posts on monitoring devicest hat can measures the vitals of people up to 10 meters away, and microsensor embedded mindfulness pills that transmit data to your phone when ingested.

So if someone steals my smartphone, does it mean that not only can s/he spam-text all my friends, but s/he can access all my health logs and PHRs that only my HIPAA compliant provider’s office and EMR systems were supposed to get their hands on?

Indeed, a news story in Med City News says that physical theft, not hacking, is the major concern for mobile storage devices. It’s far easier to flick an iPhone lying on somebody’s desk than to devote the brain- or computing power needed to hack into an EHR system from a reputable vendor.

Med City News reports that during the period from 2009-2011, there were 116 cases of data breaches involving at least 500 patient records (breaches that exposed fewer than 500 records were not included). Physical loss of devices accounted for a whopping 60% of security breaches.

As the Med City News piece notes:

HIPPA violations aren’t happening in the cloud. Rather, they’re happening in the doctor’s office, hospital IT closets, cars, subways, and homes.

Think about how much more this problem can be compounded if health logging becomes practise du jour?

Bottomline: Self-tracking may yet revolutionize healthcare, but could we as individuals potentially jeopardize our own data security? Possibly. It might be a fad among tech geeks but it needs some thinking through from an EMR/EHR perspective.

Valuable Healthcare Data or TMI? The Quantified Self

Posted on I Written By

Priya Ramachandran is a Maryland based freelance writer. In a former life, she wrote software code and managed Sarbanes Oxley related audits for IT departments. She now enjoys writing about healthcare, science and technology.

Maybe two years ago, I saw this interview on TV with this Silicon Valley yuppie who had a camera attached to a cap on his head (or maybe it was a backpack. I digress.) Every 10 seconds, the camera would kick into action and take a snapshot. This way, the yuppie surmised, he would have a repository of pretty much everything he had ever done, even the parts he didn’t like or want to share.

Fascinating as the interview was, to me the $64,000 question was Why? Why, I wondered, would someone want this much detail about his life?

Turns out, there are a whole lot of people who are into this kind of minutiae logging. And they may very well be changing the way medical records are used and stored. At Quantified Self, people believe that self-logged data holds the key to a better understanding of oneself. And some Quantified Selfers are on a mission to make it easier and cheaper to save one’s personal data.

I can think of a myriad things about my health that I might want to log and analyze – blood pressure, weight, mood swings, food intake and (ew! even) bowel movements. Such data might serve to show me the cause and effect, or at least correlations, between my daily choices and the end result of these choices. Such feedback loops apparently work. Last month’s Wired story on this topic shows how innocuous and ineffective seeming reporting can be used for positive behavior change. (There’s an interesting section on how one inventor helps non-compliant patients take their pills as directed.)

This is still a newish area of experimentation. We still don’t know if, and when, and how this trend will play out in the healthcare field. To me, there are several questions that need to be answered:

  • How is data going to be stored and transmitted to the EMR?
  • Who takes charge of interpreting all this data we will gather? Will my already overworked primary care physician for example want to look through graphs of my self-reported B.P. and weight changes?
  • How will this data interface with EMR systems already in place?
  • How safe is it to maintain a personal health data journal? What are the HIPAA implications?
  • How much is too much?

It will be interesting to see how this form of health-logging will play out.

Style and Substance — EHRs Need Both

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Greetings to all my readers out there!  For today’s blog post Style and Substance — EHRs Need Both, I invite you to visit me over at EHRoutlook.com. Ann Zeiger was kind enough to invite me to write on a topic that interests me (and hopefully her and her readers) a couple of times a month.  It’s been a good working relationship, and so I hope you’ll take the time to take a look around their site.  I found it to be actually quite packed with good information and perspectives on electronic health records and mobile healthcare technology.  Bon apetite!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Semantic Interoperability and the Replacing Doctors with Technology

Posted on August 26, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In one of my many conversations with people about EMR and healthcare IT I sent the following response to comments about Semantic Interoperability in healthcare.

I agree with you that we’re a long way from semantic interoperability. Plus, we won’t every reach the full vision of what we’d like it to be.

With that said, we will make major progress on understanding the data and assisting the doctors in what they do. It will never replace the doctors, but will be an aid to them to do better work. Other inventions on the other hand could replace doctors to some extent. Similar to how the thermometer in every home has replaced a number of doctor’s visits.

I make some pretty wide assertions in the comment above. I figured, why do them in private, when it’s so much more fun to do it in public where others can discuss and we can all learn. What do you think? How far are we from semantic interoperability in healthcare?

What about technology as a replacement for doctors? Do you think that will ever happen? Will semantic interoperability help that to happen?

What are the future “thermometers” in healthcare which will change our interaction with our healthcare providers?

Latest Practice Fusion Stats Continue to Skyrocket

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Just thought I would share with my readers the continued phenomenal climb in users and patients served by my EMR, EHR provider, Practice Fusion.  They continue to impress the heck out of me in terms of their user number, which is now over 100,000 users strong.  They reportedly add to this over 500 per day and 10,000 per month.  The patient count is now up to 16,000,000 apparently.  Considering there are about 312,000,000 citizens in the US population, that’s about 5.1%.  Quoting from the above link, “the company started the year with 55,000 users (82% increase) and 6 million patients (166% increase).”

Just remember that a while ago I predicted that Practice Fusion would be the next Gmail and that eventually every doctor would eventually have an account.  Looks like my prediction may be coming true.  No wonder venture capitalists like Peter Thiel have been pumping in the dollars.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.