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iPad Adoption Increases in Healthcare

Posted on August 2, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A quote from the article linked above:

More than 30 percent of physicians use tablet devices, compared to 5 percent of U.S. consumers, according to results of a study released June 16 by QuantiaMD, a mobile/online physician community. QuantiaMD surveyed more than 3,700 physicians for the study.

Although the next line of the article says it all. It says that only 20% of those physicians use their tablet in a clinical setting (such as with their EMR). Although, 65% expect to use a tablet to help their practice in the next couple years.

Of course, when we’re talking about tablets, we’re talking mostly about the iPad. As the previous physician social media infographic says that 75% of physicians have an Apple mobile device.

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 81-85

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for the second entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

85. Test, retest, and test the network and wireless
Far too many EHR implementations fail because of basic technology issues. Of course, the blame usually gets placed squarely on the head of the EHR company. However, in many of the cases, the EHR company has no control over the issues you have. Your local wireless and network is one place where you can doom an EHR installation and the EHR company can do nothing about it. If you want to have a great EHR installation make sure you have a great network and/or wireless infrastructure set up and tested.

84. Have ONE number to call
This recommendation applies more to large EMR installations than it does to small ones. The basic suggestion is not to give one phone number for EMR issues (ie. I can’t login) and another for technology related issues (ie. my PC crashed). The problem with multiple lines is that people don’t generally know the difference between an EMR issue and a PC issue. At the end of the day, they’re likely to consider almost everything an EMR issue. So, they’re going to call the same number anyway. You might as well just have one number that knows how to triage the issue well and direct them to the right support resource.

83. Remember who the support team’s customers are
Another recommendation for hospital EHR support. It is a great idea to remember that the support team’s customers are the clinicians that are calling for help. Prepare them for the calls they’re going to get. While clinicians are highly educated, that doesn’t guarantee that their education included even basic computer skills. You’ll be surprised how many of the issues have to do with basic computer skills as much as any EMR specific support.

82. Have a communication strategy for when things go wrong
Things are bound to go wrong. So, be ready to communicate those issues. Don’t sweep the issues under the rug either. Communicate more than is necessary. It won’t hurt as much to over communicate as it will to not communicate something important.

81. Make all of your planning very public within your organization
The fastest way to get buy in for an EHR project is to involve your organization in the planning process. Yes, that means that you’re going to hear some harsh feedback from people about what you’ve planned. Be grateful that you’re hearing the feedback during the planning stage when you can work to do something about it. That’s much better than being half way through the project and hearing the harsh criticism of your project.

If you want to see my analysis of the other 101 EMR and EHR tips, I’ll be updating this page with my 101 EMR and EHR tips analysis. So, click on that link to see the other EMR tips.

Practice Fusion’s sweet iPad action!

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Can’t believe I’m going to post a second time today, but I just could not resist the great opportunity to showcase this breaking news story on Practice Fusion’s mobile use in the field — on an iPad no less!  Check out the story and watch the NP’s video LOVE IT, LOVE IT, LOVE IT!

Update: It looks like the video has been removed for some reason. However, this provider was also profiled by Katie Couric on CBS News. The story is fascinating and the way she documents her visits is through an iPad and EHR.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

First Statewide EMR in Hawaii?

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Admittedly, Hawaii is a small state, but it’s an interesting statement to make when one EMR company gets invited to supply the state-run health system’s sole EMR.  Of course, this doesn’t mandate anything for doctors in private practice, so we’re talking about only 12 hospitals and 2 state-run clinics.  Siemens will begin actively providing electronic medical records to Hawaii in November 2012 for around $29M, so hats off to them for getting this very important contract.  Wonder how EMR incentive money works if you are a doctor to a state-run medical system.  Does the hospital just get the incentive money since the doctor technically didn’t do the selection, implementation and reporting?  It would seem justified to me.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.