Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Challenges and Risks Associated with Disclosure of Health Information in an EHR World

Posted on October 22, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at AHIMA 2012, I had a chance to sit down and talk with Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, SSGB, Sr. VP of HIM and Privacy Officer at HealthPort to talk about some of the challenges and risks associated with the disclosure of health information in this new world of EHR software. In this video, Rita talks about some challenges with EHR software disclosures that I bet a lot of people haven’t thought about before.

EMR Notes, EMR Data Visualization, Amazon EC2, and Amazing Facebook EMR Integration

Posted on October 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time again for a roundup of interesting EMR tweets. The last one is a doozy and an amazing reason to keep up on Twitter (or at least read this site…We follow tweets so you don’t have to!).


This is a sad thing to say about EMR notes. Although, I think that this tweet is a small part of a larger “revolt” against many of the cookie cutter, little value notes that are produced by many EMR software. Change is afoot in this regard, but it will take some time to get there.


I love when a company takes on EMR data visualization. We need to discover much better, more efficient ways for healthcare practitioners to be able to process increasing amounts of health data. I hope that Restful Health is successful. Plus, they’re right that doing it from multiple health data sources is much harder.


Is Amazon EC2 HIPAA compliant? I can think of some ways to get it there, but they require a whole lot of encryption to make it happen. I expect most don’t go to this effort. Thoughts?


This was a fascinating tweet for me. Far too many people mention Facebook and EMR or PHR and start to freak out. What an amazing idea to use Facebook and other social or web sources to inform the care that’s provided to a patient. I’m sure that many people will hop all over this talking about privacy issues, but I’d rather deal with those issues than deal with a patient that’s lying is causing them not to get the care they need. I wonder what other ways the web and social media could inform patient care.

EMR use improves primary care: new study

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

There seems to be a lot of buzz in the news lately around the question of whether electronic medical record documentation can lead to a higher quality of care.  Last year, a study came out suggesting that this might be true for diabetes care.  More recently, my attention came to an article published in the Journal of the American medical informatics Association in May 2012, Method of electronic health record documentation and quality of primary care.

A group of researchers led by Dr. Jeffrey Linder at Harvard University’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital studied primary care physicians taking care of 7000 patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes over nine months. The study authors assessed 15 quality measures, three of which were found to be performed significantly less by physicians using a typical dictation system for record-keeping as opposed to those keeping records by electronic medical records systems.  Two of the three standards of care measures that dictating physicians were less likely to provide were tobacco use documentation and diabetic eye examinations.
This parallels my own findings as an endocrinologist using electronic medical records. During the period of my early years before I instituted widespread use of templating, I was much less likely to hit all of the quality care measure marks compared with after instituting templates.  It’s actually quite commonsensical that a medical provider can hit all of the marks if they are prompted by the computer.  In a sense, the care goes on autopilot.  No matter how chaotic a given point in the day of a busy doctor might be, it becomes impossible to complete a note without performing all of the prompts unless doing so deliberately.

There has been at least one or two studies that I’m aware of that have doubted or not found the conclusion that electronic medical records improve the quality of care patients receive.  I think that most likely these studies did not find a significant association because they were not properly designed.  When one considers the volume of quality measures pertinent to a typical patient visit with diabetes or coronary artery disease, there are so many measures that unless every physician has the measures memorized and never forgets anything, gets flustered or has to hurry through the visit, there will almost be a guarantee that not all measures will be addressed at a visit.  I’ll take that bet and win every time.

The fact that there are now at least two studies showing a positive relationship between the quality of care given to diabetic patients in the use of electronic medical records documentation is even stronger evidence that this is a real phenomenon.  Personally, I can’t believe that anybody would think that electronic medical records don’t lead to better care, regardless of the degree of such improvement.  That is, unless they’re not using the templating advantage.

Highlights from Ed Marx Hospital CIO Strategy Talk at #CHIME12

Posted on October 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was really excited when I found out that Ed Marx’s, CIO of Texas Health Resources, talk at CHIME 2012 was one of the encore presentations since I’d missed it earlier in the week. Thankfully he didn’t disappoint. Here are some tweets I sent during his talk with some additional commentary on what he said.


I loved his comment on the need for hospitals to have a strategy when it comes to mobile health. He acknowledged that even with a strategy in place it’s a pretty crazy environment right now, but he said that he couldn’t imagine where they’d be if they had no strategy. It’s a good acknowledgement that mobile health is here to stay and it’s better to have a proactive approach to mobile health.


Great advice. Far too often I see people trying to swing for the fences instead of being happy with a single. Many hospital organizations could use a quick win for morale sake. Then, with that confidence they can work on the bigger, longer term goals.


There are a lot of ways to learn. Ed Marx pointed out that every hospital CIO should be on social media. I’d argue that the reason they should be on social media is to learn. Learn from customers. Learn from colleagues. Twitter is an amazing platform for learning and listening. You don’t have to broadcast on social media if you don’t want.


I love the transparency that Ed strives to achieve. Putting your performance review for all to read is a brave choice. Although, he made a good point. His performance review wasn’t just a reflection of him, but was a reflection of the entire organization in many ways.


Such a great way to describe the idea of getting out of the office and working with people from other departments. The challenge with this is that many people aren’t very good at this type of social interaction. Some people have this naturally, but others have to work really hard to make it happen. This type of description can help some who have this challenge I think.


I was amazed that he said this was the most important thing. I’ve always loved the value of looking to multiple sources for inspiration. Very important and useful!


Ed suggested that most CIO’s could identify the CEO’s top priority, but not the top 10.


I think it’s true that many hospital CIO’s live in partial fear for their jobs. I guess we all do to some extent. I’m not sure this tweet is going to change things, but hopefully it’s a challenge for many who have avoided risks. Thoughtful risks can work out very well if done right.


Beautiful description of leadership, but hard to achieve.

One other major point that Ed made that I didn’t tweet about had to do with the idea of a project not being an IT project. Ed described the need for IT to make themselves open and available to lead those projects. Although, in order for that to happen, they have to create a trusted leadership role within the organization.

For example, instead of talking to the CEO, CFO, board, etc about project timelines, projects completed, and missed schedule, talk to them about ROI and improved patient care. However, to do so takes a real focus on measuring the costs and benefits of each project.

Getting Personal with EMRs and Women’s Health

Posted on October 18, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

It’s that time of year again. Like my mother, I’ve taken to scheduling any sort of annual event around the time of my birthday. So, now my birthday cake is accompanied by a trip to get my emissions done, a jaunt to the tag office, and a visit to my primary care doctor for an annual physical and any other female-related health services I might need. (Timely, considering that October is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month.)

I tend not to schedule my well visits months in advance, and so was a bit apprehensive earlier in the week as I dialed in to get an appointment. I’ve read quite a few patient horror stories lately of appointments not being available for months due to lack of staff. Thankfully, this was not my experience. I was able to pick the date and time of my choosing, with the only insurance-related caveat being that I had to wait until one day after the date of my exam in 2011.

When I was at the doctor’s office last year, they were in the process of launching a patient portal. Digging around on their website while speaking with their receptionist, I noticed the portal is indeed available. The patient-centric portal offers online bill pay, appointment scheduling and pre-registration services and a personal health record. I’ll be interested to see if they mention its availability when I am seen in a few weeks. I’ll definitely ask who was involved with the implementation, and if they’re looking to Stage 2 Meaningful Use quotas when it comes to electronic patient engagement.

But enough about me. The reason I bring all this up is because the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association recently made available research on “The effect of electronic medical record system sophistication on preventive healthcare for women.” A quick look at the abstract relates that 29.23% of providers (culled from those in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2007-08) had no EMR system, 49.43% had minimal EMRs, 15.97% had basic EMRS, and 5.46% had fully functional EMRs.

“For breast examinations, pelvic examinations, pap tests, Chlamydia tests, cholesterol tests, mammograms, and bone mineral density tests, an EMR system increased the number of these tests and examinations,” according to the abstract. “Furthermore, the level of sophistication increased the number of breast examinations and pap, Chlamydia, cholesterol and BMD tests.”

The JAMIA’s point being that “the use of advanced EMR systems in obstetrics and gynecology was limited. Given the positive results of this study, specialists in women’s health should consider investing in more sophisticated systems.”

I’m going to play devil’s advocate here for a minute.

First of all, the fact that not even 5.5% of providers surveyed had a fully functional EMR is dismaying, but perhaps I don’t understand the underlying financial reasons for their lack of adoption. And the fact that the survey was taken more than four years ago could play a part. It would seem to me that there would be much to gain clinically and financially in having a fully function EMR especially in obstetrics, where women are often seen at a number of facilities throughout their pregnancies.

And finally, I have to take issue with the “positive results” the JAMIA concludes the study to have had. To me, “positive” connotes “successful,” so I wonder if there’s a hidden conflict of interest here. Increased sophistication of EMR systems would seem to equal more tests, according to the study, but no mention is made of if those tests lead to better outcomes (a win for patients) or higher reimbursements (a win for providers). I know we walk a fine line when talking about EMRs, tests and money, and that it often ends up being a chicken-and-egg situation, but it’s still a debate that needs to be had, especially in the area of women’s health.

Vendor Hopes To Create Market For Windows 8-Based Tablet EMR

Posted on October 17, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

So far, Microsoft  has played its cards pretty close to the vest when it comes to the launch of its new tablet line (and iPad wannabe Surface. But news is trickling out on Surface, which will officially go to market October 26th.  That includes news of the first EMR built for the Surface, EMR Surface, which appears for sale in the new Microsoft Windows Store online for $499 a download.

EMR Surface is produced by a company called Pariscribe, based in Toronto, which says it was key in building Canada’s first Web-based EMR. Its existing products include a radiology system, physiotherapy suite, dental suite, patient registration software for kiosks and an EMR.

What makes EMR Surface interesting isn’t just that it’s based on a new tablet. Far more interesting is that it runs on Windows 8 which, according to a piece in  MobiHealthNews, the company sees as a major competitive advantage in the corporate world.

As readers know, the majority of mobile devices in healthcare run on iOS or Android, and last I checked, there’s been little discussion of the notion that a Windows 8 device could slip between the cracks.  That doesn’t mean Pariscribe is whacky to think so, however; in fact, it’s an intriguing idea.

According to article author Neil Versel, Pariscribe president and CEO Manny Abraham believes that Surface and Windows 8 and Surface will do a better job of bridging the gap between mobile and desktop computing.  If he’s right, the company is really on to something.

The thing is, iOS and Android have an iron grip on the mobile device market right now. Even the might of Microsoft might not be sufficient to break the market’s preference for these two operating systems.

That being said, if Pariscribe has come up with a particularly nifty solution, it could give Surface-based (and Win 8 based) EMRs a foot in the door. I’m eager to see how they do!

EMR Interfaces Gone Wrong, Or The Tale Of The Albanian Patient

Posted on October 16, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, for your consideration, we have the tale of the Albanian patient who wasn’t Albanian.  More broadly, I’m here to discuss the perils of adding an extra interface consideration to the workflow of busy EMR users, and the impact that has on data quality.

Scope, a blog published by the Stanford School of Medicine, shares the case of the Merced County, California physician who, exasperated with the requirement that he identify the ethnicity of each patient, chooses “Albanian” for all of them. Why? Simply because “Albanian” is the first item of the rather long list in the pulldown menu.

As a result of this interface issue, any attempt to mine this veteran doctor’s data for population health analysis is weakened, writes Anna Lembke, MD, asssistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford.  And this physician’s choices should give the “big data” users pause, she suggests:

Misinformation in electronic medical records, whether accidental or otherwise, has far-reaching consequences for patients and health care policy, because electronic medical records are being actively ‘data-mined’ by large health care conglomerates and the government as a basis for improving care. This is an important downside to consider as we move forward.

Dr. Lembke’s observations are important ones. If government entities and health organizations would like to mine the increasingly large pools of data EMRs are collecting, it’s important to look at whether the data collected actually reflects the care being given and the patients being seen.

I’m not suggesting that we audit clinicians’ efforts wholesale — they’d rightfully find it offensively intrusive — but I am suggesting that we audit the interfaces themselves from time to time.  Even a quarterly review of the interfaces and workflow an EMR demands, and results it produces, might help make sure that the data actually reflects reality.

Highlights From Dr. David J. Brailer at 2012 NYeC Digital Health Conference

Posted on October 15, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

While not everyone can make it to the NYeC 2012 Digital Health Conference, John is making sure everyone can enjoy parts of the conference from home. Dr. David J. Brailer, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and current Chairman of Health Evolution Partners, is a keynote speaker at this week’s conference, and spoke today on HIT.

Throughout the presentation, John live tweeted some highlights, as well as his own thoughts. Here are some of his tweets — if you want to see more, be sure to follow @EHRandHIT on Twitter.

If you present at the conference, what were some favorite insights from Dr. Brailer?

$4.2 Million New York Digital Health Accelerator Announces Inaugural Class

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today at the Digital Health Conference, NYeC announced their inaugural class of companies for the New York Digital Health Accelerator. This is a big announcement just 5 months after they announced the creation of the Digital Health Accelerator.

As I said when I first wrote about this health IT accelerator, there are a number of health IT accelerators and incubators out there, but I think that the Digital Health Accelerator differentiates itself in a couple important ways. First, they offer $300k of investment in the company. Second, they have real tangible relationships with hospital systems. The second is likely the more important. There’s little of more value to a health IT startup company than actual customers giving you feedback on what you’re creating.

Here’s the full press release announcing the inaugural class including a list of companies:

NYeC, Partnership for New York City Fund and the DOH have Joined Forces to Create $4.2M Digital Health Accelerator Program, the Largest Program of its Kind, to Encourage Health IT Innovation and Create Jobs

New York, NY – Today the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) and the Partnership for New York City Fund (Partnership Fund) revealed the inaugural class of the New York Digital Health Accelerator (NYDHA), a program that will make New York a hub for the emerging digital health technology industry. The partnership is the largest-funded health IT accelerator program in the United States, and the first to provide access to senior-level healthcare providers who are committed to the success of the eight growth-stage companies selected.

With its initial investment of $4.2 million, the NYDHA program will create approximately 1,500 jobs over five years. In addition, it is expected that the companies will attract upwards of $150 million to $200 million in investment from the venture capital community post-program.

The program has selected 8 early- and growth-stage companies that are developing cutting-edge technology products in care coordination, patient engagement, analytics and message alerts for healthcare providers. The program received 250 applications from companies located in 27 states and 10 countries.  Each chosen company is awarded up to $300,000 along with invaluable mentoring from senior-level executives at leading hospitals and other providers in New York for nine months. Each company has committed to opening an office in New York State.

“The Accelerator provides much-needed, valuable tools for providers in support of New York State’s Medicaid Redesign initiative,” New York State Health Commissioner Nirav R. Shah, M.D., M.P.H. said.  “The initiative, which promotes a shift from the costly fee-for-service model to a more effective and efficient managed care approach, is resulting in better care – at lower cost – for patients across the continuum of care.  The Accelerator is an essential first step to stimulate the market and nurture innovation within the entrepreneurial community.”

Tech companies accepted into the program are receiving direct mentorship and feedback from senior-level executives with the participating providers. Their coaching, testing, and feedback will help these companies create the most efficient tools that the medical community will want to use to streamline the sharing of electronic medical records and improve coordination of care.

In addition, companies have direct access to the technology platform that is connecting electronic health records across New York State, the Statewide Health Information Network of New York (SHIN-NY).

“We are creating the next generation of healthcare applications that will transform the healthcare delivery system,” said NYeC Executive Director David Whitlinger. “These companies are the first software development vendors to have direct access to the SHIN-NY, a secure platform that embodies all of the federal and state policies for usage of patient data by the community.”

“One of the biggest challenges for early stage health care companies is getting access to large customers” explains Maria Gotsch, President and CEO, Partnership for New York City Fund.  “This program not only provides that access but allows the eight companies to benefit from high level feedback, which will accelerate their growth and create good jobs in the important health IT sector in New York.”

The investment capital was provided by a syndicate of investors, including Aetna, Janssen Healthcare Innovation, Milestone Venture Partners, New Leaf Venture Partners, Partnership for New York City Fund, Quaker Partners, Safeguard Scientifics, and UnitedHealth Group. The Empire State Development Corporation, Health Research Inc., and NYeC have provided additional funds to operate the NYDHA.

The 8 selected companies include:

AdhereTx: KnowMyMeds web-based, interoperable software supports team-based medication management and reconciliation for high-risk patients at the point of care. KnowMyMeds enables healthcare practitioners to perform clinically validated, cost-effective medication review for high-risk patients, including “dual eligibles” and the chronically ill, to reduce their drug-related hospitalizations and readmissions. (www.adhertx.com)

Aidin: Aidin is a web-based referral platform for hospitals discharging patients to post-acute care.  Aidin collects hard data about how well post-acute providers perform and makes it easy for hospital staff to present that information to patients when they are choosing their post-acute provider – helping patients choose better providers for better outcomes. (www.myaidin.com)

Avado: Avado allows clinicians and patients to securely communicate, track, and manage health information. They centralize data from many EHR’s and make it usable for all stakeholders.  Providers can take comfort knowing that Avado exceeds Meaningful Use requirements for patient engagement while also addressing requirements for medical homes and accountable models. (www.avado.com)

CipherHealth: CipherHealth helps hospitals avoid government penalties by reducing preventable readmissions, improving outcomes, better coordinating care, and creating a positive patient experience.  CipherHealth reaches out over the phone, through tablets, via email, text, or the web, better engaging patients in their care and building stronger relationships between patients and providers. (www.cipherhealth.com)

Cureatr: Cureatr will improve how healthcare providers communicate and coordinate patient care. Their lightweight, user-friendly HIPAA-secure group messaging system integrates with existing directory, scheduling and paging systems, making it easy to use while coordinating care within or between organizations. (www.cureatr.com)

 MedCPU: MedCPU delivers accurate real-time clinical care advice through its revolutionary Advisor Button technology. It uniquely captures the complete clinical picture from clinicians’ free-text notes, dictations and structured documentation entered into any EMR, and analyzes it against a growing library of best-practice content, generating real-time precise prompts for best care consideration. (www.medcpu.com)

Remedy Systems: Remedy Systems leverages the power of mobile to lower the cost and improve the quality of healthcare via its flexible care coordination platform that enables physicians and nurses to concentrate on delivering the highest quality of care possible while fostering engagement from patients and family/friends. (www.remedysystems.com) 

SpectraMD: SpectraMD maximizes the value of data across the continuum of care with business intelligence solutions. Their FOCUS™ Actionable Analytics platform enables stakeholders in hospitals and ambulatory care settings to improve outcomes, increase revenues, succeed in quality-based initiatives including Reducing Preventable Readmissions and leverage analytics for the Health Home initiative. (www.spectramd.com)

22 leading healthcare providers are engaged in intense mentorship with the selected companies including:

Adirondack Health Institute Institute for Family Health
Albany Medical Center Maimonides Medical Center
Catholic Health System Mt Sinai Medical Center
Community Healthcare Network NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation
Continuum Health Partners New York Hospital Queens
Ellis Medicine New York-Presbyterian Hospital
FEGS Health and Human Services System North Shore LIJ Health System
Finger Lakes Community Health NYU Langone Medical Center
Hometown Health Centers Stony Brook University Medical Center
Hudson River Health Care Visiting Nurse Service of Schenectady and Saratoga Counties
Hudson Valley Initiative Winthrop University Hospital

Resources:

A new website at www.digitalhealthaccelerator.com provides updates and progress of the program.

About The New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC): NYeC is a not-for-profit organization, working to improve healthcare for all New Yorkers through health information technology (health IT). Founded in 2006 by healthcare leaders, NYeC receives funding from state and federal grants to serve as the focal point for health IT in the State of New York. NYeC works to develop policies and standards, to assist healthcare providers in making the shift to electronic health records, and to coordinate the creation of a network to connect healthcare providers statewide. The goal of NYeC is that no patient, wherever they may need treatment within the State of New York, is ever without fast, secure, accurate, and accessible information. For more information about NYeC, visit www.nyehealth.org @NYeHealth on Twitter.

About the Partnership for New York City Fund (Partnership Fund):The Partnership for New York City Fund (www.nycif.org) is the vision of Henry R. Kravis, founding partner of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., who serves as its Founding Chairman. The Fund has raised over $110 million to mobilize the city’s world financial and business leaders to help build a stronger and more diversified local economy. It has built a network of top experts from the investment and corporate communities who help identify and support New York City’s most promising entrepreneurs in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. The Fund is governed by a Board of Directors co-chaired by Russell L. Carson, General Partner of Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe; and Richard M. Cashin, Managing Partner of One Equity Partners. The Fund is the economic development arm of the Partnership for New York City (www.pfnyc.org), an organization of the leaders of New York City’s top corporate, investment, and entrepreneurial firms. They work in partnership with city and state government officials, labor groups, and the nonprofit sector to promote the interest of the city and its neighborhoods. The Partnership carries out research, policy formulation, and issue advocacy at the city, state, and federal levels, leveraging the resources and expertise of its CEO and Corporate partners.

About the Statewide Health Information Network of New York (SHIN-NY): The SHIN-NY (pronounced “shiny”) is coordinated by the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) and functions similarly to a public utility, making electronic health records secure and accessible to healthcare providers statewide while improving patient care and lowering costs. SHIN-NY is a network of information transmitted between users. Like the Internet, as more users connect, it grows, evolves, and becomes more secure, efficient, and easy to use. As an increasing number of private practices, nursing homes, clinics and hospitals begin to digitize their records, they have the option to connect to information hubs in their region of the state. These Regional Health Information Organizations collect health record data from the healthcare providers in their area and, with patient consent, allow this information to be shared securely with other providers in the region. The SHIN-NY will connect these regional hubs to create a private and secure network spanning the entire State of New York. To see a video about how the SHIN-NY is transforming health information exchange in New York State visit http://nyehealth.org/what-we-do/statewide-network/.

Healthcare Social Media, Call for Halt on MU Payments, and Healthbox London – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on October 14, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR, EHR and HIPAA

Mobile EHR as a Solution for EHR Downtime

There has been some EHR downtime recently from major EHR vendors, which has given an opportunity for mobile EHRs to get more of a spotlight. Mitochin recently released a Mobile EHR, and John had the opportunity to review it. It has some different features than other mobile EHRs that are available, and appears to be a great alternative for accessing EHRs when downtime happens.

Healthcare Social Media Happenings

There’s lots of ways to “be in the know” with healthcare and social media. This post directs interested readers to different ways to get involved recently, including attending weekly #HITsm chats, following the happenings at the New York Digital Health Conference, and more.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Congressmen Want Halt on Meaningful Use Payments

Four congressmen are rallying against current Meaningful Use Stage 2 regulations, and half payments for MU. HIMSS has released a statement against this, and there is a lot of debate about what to do. Some of their complaints are warranted and should be taken seriously, it isn’t completely clear cut what the solution should be.

EMR and EHR Thoughts

Healthbox Expands to European Startups

Healthbox has been helping startups in the United States by providing them with seed capital and access to resources. The company is now expanding to Europe, specifically London. Startups have been able to submit applications since July and a decision on which startups that were selected was expected in September.

Smart Phone Health Care

My First (Actual) Experience With A Patient Portal

Medical practices all over the country are implementing patient portals. The pediatrician’s office that Katie takes her son to just created one, and in this post, she talks about her first look at it. What parts of your patient portal do you like?