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Off Subject: Black Friday

Posted on November 29, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What’s your thoughts of Black Friday? Yes, this post has nothing to do with EMR and EHR, but you should be on vacation and spending time with family. Plus, if you’re at work you could probably use a diversion as well. So, let’s talk about Black Friday.

I ironically posted a Healthcare IT Black Friday post over on EMR and HIPAA today. I’ll be interested to see how many people like the idea of giving the gift of e-learning this holiday season. Nothing like giving the gift of learning. Although, I’m sure many would love chocolate as well. Of course, no reason you can’t do both.

How do you approach Black Friday? Do you brave the stores and find great deals? Are you like me and think that most of the black friday deals aren’t all that big of a deal?

As someone who doesn’t mind crowds, I don’t mind the crowded shopping. In fact, I kind of relish in a packed mall, full of people hustling and bustling around during the holiday season. My wife on the other hand hates it. However, I don’t see any need to get out and do all my shopping on Black Friday.

I don’t see shopping for gifts as a chore, but as a fun time to find something that will brightens someone’s day. I definitely don’t go overboard on gift giving. I try to be thoughtful and provide something of meaning and value to the people who receive my gifts. If I can’t find something that reaches those goals, I usually don’t give a gift.

Since I can’t resist comparison, I think this is a little like healthcare IT. Too often we try to force something that doesn’t make sense. That almost always leads to a failed or defunct project. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be creative. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t push the envelope. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t create change in our organizations. In fact, I’d argue that it will take extra creativity, pushing the envelope, and change to do what we know we should be doing in healthcare IT.

Either way, I guess you could call this my day off from blogging. I’d love to hear your thoughts. Regardless, I hope you’re having a great holiday weekend.

Giving Thanks for Patient Portals – #HITThanks

Posted on November 27, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company’s social media strategies for Billian’s HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

My cup of healthcare thankfulness was overflowing last week, as back-to-back doctor’s appointments went smoothly and didn’t leave me with any unpleasant and unexpected diagnostic surprises. My thankfulness even extended into the IT realm as I received word from both my daughters’ pediatrician and my primary care doctor that both offices (on separate EMRs) now offer patient portals. Though I might occasionally grouse that patient portals don’t yet lend themselves to truly coordinated care between different types of providers who may use different IT systems, I truly believe they are game changing when it comes to increasing provider efficiency and patient satisfaction.

I was so happy to get this pamphlet in the mail alerting me to patient portal availability.

I was so happy to get this pamphlet in the mail alerting me to patient portal availability.

No longer will I have to wait 10 days for lab test or EKG results. No longer will I have to wait impatiently by the phone for the pediatric advice nurse to call me back regarding treatment for, thankfully, run-of-the-mill illnesses and complaints. Secure messaging will ease my worry when it comes to my kids, and the anxiety I often have waiting for results of any kind.

I can now happily say that the majority of my family’s providers – pediatrician, primary care physician, and surgeon – all offer some type of patient portal, which leaves me even more inclined to evangelize the need for one the next time I’m at my dermatologist.

Though I have perhaps lamented in the past that patient portals don’t do a whole lot of good if one patient has to use several for multiple providers, they certainly are a step in the direction of true interoperability.

On a side note, I’m also thankful that my primary care physician has finally seen fit to offer reliable wifi throughout the office. There is nothing more frustrating than to be kept waiting in the main reception area or exam room with no connection to phone or Internet. I wonder if wifi access has become a point of contention when it comes to patient satisfaction.

I hope that many of us in the industry can point to one or two things we are thankful for due to healthcare IT. What are yours? Share your #HITthanks in the comments below.

Learning about HealthFusion and MediTouch EHR

Posted on November 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is an interview with Dr. Seth Flam, Co-Founder and CEO of HealthFusion. If you’d like to hear more from Dr. Flam, he’s doing a Meaningful Use stage 2 webinar today at 9:15 PST (12:15 EST).
DrSethFlam
Tell us a little bit of the history of HealthFusion.

HealthFusion was founded in San Diego in 1998 by two primary care physicians. The company started out as a clearinghouse, but has since evolved into a fully integrated software suite – including MediTouch EHR (Electronic Health Records and Patient Portal) and MediTouch PM (Practice Management and Claims Clearinghouse).

What differentiates the MediTouch EHR from the other hundreds of EHR software out there?

First of all, even though the iPad has been part of our culture now for over three years, there are still very few pure cloud EHRs that work natively on the iPad browser. Native is important because with MediTouch, every EHR function that can be performed on the desktop can also be performed on the iPad. Our product was developed from the ground up for the iPad, so the interface is not a “retrofit” from an older legacy desktop one. Instead the interface is a set of buttons that are sized perfectly for fingertip and even work well on the iPad mini.

Now if you couple that with Meaningful Use 2014 certification, I challenge you to find more than a handful of products that meet this profile. But that is just the tip of the iceberg. We are consistently rated by users on average at around 4.5 stars out of 5, so our doctors love us. Because we are an early adaptor of new technology we have the time to not just present new technologies such as the ones required in Meaningful Use 2014, but we have the time to hone those new technologies and make them usable.

It seems that HealthFusion’s MediTouch EHR has been designed for every specialty, but are there certain specialties where it really excels?

Primary care is of course a focus. We are poised to release our comprehensive Patient Centered Medical Home module this month. Our commitment to Medical Home is very strong and I don’t know of any software that makes becoming a tier three medical home easier. Speaking of primary care, we do great with OB/Gyn and Pediatrics – in fact, Miami Children’s Hospital has selected MediTouch as their exclusive private label solution for their hundreds of admitting providers. For Pediatrics, that’s the best validation of our product, especially since MCH is known as the technology leader among pediatric hospitals.

We service most all of the internal medicine specialties, many of the surgical specialties and some niche providers such as pain management specialists. We are the exclusive EHR vendor for the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and the first cloud-based endorsed by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA ). Needless to say, we are very strong with the Osteopathic doctors from all specialty types and simply the best choice for podiatric physicians. And it’s not just us saying that – we have the endorsement of those associations to back it up.

What’s been HealthFusion’s approach to meaningful use?  Are you ready for meaningful use stage 2?

HealthFusion’s MediTouch was actually one of the first 5 pure ambulatory EHRs to achieve Meaningful Use Stage 2 certification. Our whole system was designed with the government standards in mind, which means Meaningful Use is incorporated into the daily workflows of our EHR.

As an additional resource, we recently started hosting webinars on Meaningful Use. The next one is scheduled for November 26th, and will offer a “deep dive” into Meaningful Use Stage 2.

Most EHR vendors that were certified for 2011 have not achieved Meaningful Use 2014 certification. Buyers should be leery of EHRs that cannot meet government compliance standards. We are beginning what I call the “Great American EHR Consolidation.” Simply stated, if your EHR can’t meet Meaningful Use 2014 by the end of this year, you are at a disadvantage heading into 2014. Remember, 2014 is not just about Meaningful Use – ICD- 10 begins in the fourth quarter. Providers need time to prepare for ICD-10, it is even more important than Meaningful Use since it impacts every dollar. Because Meaningful Use 2014 compliance is behind us, we have been able to focus on developing all of the tools providers will require to make their transition to the new diagnosis coding system easier. A simple list of ICD-10 codes just won’t cut it – the tools need to be more sophisticated and we have them today.

How have your doctors and other doctors responded to meaningful use from your experience?

Meaningful Use and other government compliance programs are here to stay. Sticking your head in the sand simply won’t work. In fact, we would not be surprised if the federal government standards that define Meaningful Use spill over to private sector. I think providers liked getting the front loaded incentive dollars but I don’t think they like some of the compliance requirements, and they definitely don’t like the threat of an audit. I am certain that they will find Stage 2 harder, and that is why they need committed technology vendors to help simplify workflows for them. Patient Engagement requirements such as a Meaningful Use compliant patient portal can simplify Meaningful Use, and of course that should be part of the buying decision for physicians.

How are you approaching interoperability?  What will be the key to cracking the interoperability challenge?

With interoperability, the problem isn’t with the sophisticated EHRs, instead it is with the lack of mandated standards and the adoption of those standards. MediTouch responds quickly when faced with a new standard, a good example is Direct Secure Messaging. This is the new standard for secure email. It’s crazy, we adopted the standard in June and our providers have secure email addresses but hardly anyone to exchange mail with today. In the coming months we hope that will change as more EHR vendors implement this standard.

The government makes interoperability challenging because as an example they use HL7 standards alone to define a way to exchange data, but HL7 is at best a “suggestion, not a standard.” What I mean is that there is too much room for interpretation within the HL7 guide to permit seamless interoperability across multiple exchange points. A good example is the immunization registries that are run by state or regional entities. I like to say, if you connected to one state you connected to one state. The work required to maintain and manage 50-60 connections and standards is wasted time that could be spent on better projects. It would have been simple for the government to tighten the requirements so that there was less variation between states, or to consider a national immunization registry with a single standard and connection.

Are you getting many requests to incorporate accountable care (ACO) features into the EHR?  What’s your thoughts on the future of ACOs in healthcare?

First of all, I hope they work. Sharing savings is not a new concept and there have been failures, occasions where quality was sacrificed for short-term financial gain. With EHR technology, we think that there is enormous promise and it starts with great Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH). It will take a new breed or a transformed primary care doctor to really make PCMH work because it changes the role of the primary care doctor significantly. Managing patient populations is different than managing individual visits. MediTouch software is committed to making PCMH work for primary care practices so we expect to play an important role in the interplay between primary care medical homes and the ACOs they relate to. The truth is that without great EHR software that supports PCMH, the ACO initiative will fail and therefore we understand that the effectiveness of our software will contribute to better population management, and ultimately the success of ACOs.

Where is Health Fusion heading 5-10 years from now?

We have a nimble group of engineers and we have found that meeting government mandated compliance standards has not been an obstacle that we cannot easily overcome. By complying with Meaningful Use 2014 early we now have time to do what we love and that is innovate. Our innovation process is simple – we listen to our users. As a physician I know that it is difficult for engineers to understand the complex workflows required to manage just a single day in a doctor’s office, and our culture is built on listening closely to the end user – the medical practice.

There are times though that we innovate or create new features that were never requested by a medical practice. Remember, we were designing an iPad EHR solution one year before the iPad was released, clearly that was way before any physician would have requested a system like the one we designed. Steve Jobs invented the iPad even though there was no market for the device prior to its release. A great EHR combines features that are a reach (like the example of the invention of the iPad) with more everyday solutions that refine everyday workflows. Remember, each year the practice of medicine requires more attention to administrative and compliance issues – our job is to innovate at a faster rate so that provider workflow is continually enhanced, and to make sure that patient care is still rewarding for our docs.

Full Disclosure: HealthFusion is a sponsor of EMR and EHR.

Bill Would Allow Mental Health Providers To Get MU Incentives

Posted on November 25, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Right now, mental health providers aren’t eligible to get Meaningful Use incentive payments — but a new bill would make that possible.  U.S. Senator Rob Portman, a Republican from Ohio, has filed legislation that would add mental health providers to HITECH, making them eligible for payments if they meet Meaningful Use standards, according to a story in Healthcare IT News.

The bill, the Behavioral Health Information Technology Coordination Act, is intended to “fix an oversight in the system,” said Portman in a press statement announcing its filing. “”[By] making IT the bedrock to fully integrated care, my bill will enhance care and treatment for the mentally ill and put them on a path to lead healthy and productive lives.”

The announcement drew praise from a mental health trade organization in Portman’s home state. The CEO of the Ohio Council of Behavioral & Family Health Services Providers, Hubert Wirtz. “Adequate investment in healthcare information technology is critical to enabling mental health and addiction providers to implement systems that help them improve care coordination, provide quality care, measure outcomes and enable continuity of care between primary care, mental health and addiction services,” reports HIN.

However, it seems that Portman’s bill may not reach a vote, as it now sits in a congressional committee, the HIN story notes.

Regardless, though, Portman’s proposal is a good one. Good mental health outcomes, which the right EMR can enhance, can do much to address the health of a population, empowering consumers to take better care of their physical health.  What’s more, encouraging behavioral health providers to have a mental health EMR in place can share their findings smoothly with care managers (ideally PCPs) who can do their part to provide integrated care. All told, this seems like an idea whose time has come.

OMG to WTF EMR Pain Scale

Posted on November 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I don’t think this chart needs any intro. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words and no doubt this graph will be a great point of conversation with many that find themselves on the chart. Not to mention those that think the chart is a poor representation of reality. I look forward to the discussion on the comments.

Making Meaningful Use of Hospital Social Engagement Strategies

Posted on November 22, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company’s social media strategies for Billian’s HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

My latest healthcare field trip took me to the Health 2.0 Atlanta Meetup group, a blossoming community of startup professionals, investors and folks like me who want to stay abreast of innovation happening on the fringes of our industry. Previous events have been dedicated to startup showcasing, but this most recent meetup turned the tables by gathering a panel of marketing executives from three of Atlanta’s most well-known health systems – WellStar, Piedmont and Emory.

I think if this panel had gotten together last year, or even two years ago, all the talk would have been around how to market their EMRs to current and prospective patients. (WellStar and Piedmont are on Epic, while Emory is on Cerner.) EMRs were mentioned once or twice. The big theme that seemed to run throughout the series of moderated questions was … wait for it … patient engagement. More specifically, all three panelists stressed the importance of using social media as a patient acquisition and retention tool. As Sandra Mackey, Executive Director of Marketing at Emory, so succinctly stated, social media is no longer a “need to have,” but rather a “must have.”

Matt Gove, CMO and SVP of External Affairs at Piedmont, noted that he has been able to demonstrate solid ROI from the health system’s social media efforts, connecting the dots between Piedmont messaging in Facebook feeds to booked appointments and revenue-generating procedures. Both Piedmont and WellStar have turned to third parties like Brightwhistle, Tailfin and ReachLocal to help them pinpoint the best places for social messaging. Gove’s efforts have been so successful that he has focused more staff on social media management, and now integrates social media into more campaigns than ever before.

All three panelists seemed to agree that marketing spend going forward won’t be on big media like radio and T.V. ads, but rather on messaging that reaches a patient’s inbox or Facebook feed. Mackey noted that people are growing up on social media now, and they wouldn’t dream of going anywhere but to their social networks for healthcare recommendations. Her comment directly correlated to Gove’s simple wish for physicians to do their jobs well. A positive experience lends itself to stories that can be shared among patients’ social networks, potentially garnering that hospital exponential exposure and brand recognition.

I wonder how hospitals will adapt their social engagement strategies over the next year. What will be top of mind for hospital marketing executives in 2014 and beyond? Give me your take by leaving a comment below.

A Do-Not-Forget Checklist for EHR Switchers on the Hook for Meaningful Use

Posted on November 21, 2013 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Tom S. Lee, PhD, CEO and Founder at SA Ignite.

According to a recent survey by Black Book rankings, as many as 16 percent of ambulatory EHR users may become  EHR switchers within the next 12 months.  Large health systems such as Intermountain (a client of ours) and the Department of Defense have recently announced that they are switching EHRs or are currently evaluating a change. Many such organizations are planning to switch EHRs while continuing to meet increasingly difficult Stage 2 Meaningful Use (MU) requirements.  According to past National Coordinator  Dr. Farzad Mostashari, there will be no delay of MU Stage 2. That means your health IT road map may now include switching EHRs, managing Stage 2 attestations, and achieving ICD-10 compliance.

How do you switch jugglers while the number of balls in the air increases at the same time?

We have encountered a common set of issues and questions in our work with clients, discussions with prospects, and exchanges with thought leaders in the industry related to the EHR switching scenario, especially as it relates to Meaningful Use.  Here are some things to consider:

1. Assess and properly store data from your old EHR for future MU audits. A recent wave of MU audit notices has been sent by CMS to some of the country’s leading health systems. Each MU attestation is subject to audit 6 years after the attestation date.  With this in mind, be sure to pull out and securely and centrally store all supporting data from your old EHR before its license expires.  Get expert assistance if needed to understand how to build a comprehensive and solid audit trail.  One great place start is the guidance on audit documentation provided by CMS.

2. Optimize the timing of the EHR switch relative to government reporting timelines.  For example, in 2014 there is a one-time opportunity to report on only a calendar quarter’s worth of data for many eligible providers, rather than the entire year.  This modification to MU was originally made to accommodate delayed Stage 2 certifications by the EHR vendors.  However, it can also be leveraged by EHR switchers who can time the switch to happen within 2014 to benefit from a lower compliance bar while the massive impacts of switching EHRs are absorbed by the organization.

3. Plan to merge data across EHRs to meet MU reporting requirements.  Even with the 2014 calendar-quarter reporting reprieve, for many hospitals and eligible providers to achieve Meaningful Use in an EHR-switching year it’ll be necessary to stitch together Meaningful Use data across the old and new EHRs in order to meet many MU reporting requirements.  For example, this may be required simply to meet the minimum certified EHR usage threshold to be eligible for the MU program in that year.  Assume merging data will be necessary, prepare how to do so before your old EHR license expires, seek help, or do both. An interesting contingency we have seen is to drive eligible providers to “over perform” on their MU measures on the old EHR in anticipation that MU performance will drop at the outset of adapting to the new EHR.  This will increase the chances that providers’ total MU performance within a reporting period spanning both EHRs will end up above threshold.

4. Plan to be supporting two EHRs at the same time.  Although it is sometimes possible to do a “big bang” switchover to a new EHR across an entire organization, we often see that rollout plans for the new EHR are phased across specialty, location, or other sub-groups.  During those periods when the organization could be supporting two different EHRs, such as two ambulatory EHRs in different geographic regions, it is important to organize and align teams to not only handle the immediate demands of MU but also transition completely to supporting the new EHR.  For example, MU data reporting and attestation can be hard enough for just one ambulatory EHR, much less two.  It takes preparation well in advance of the EHR switch and government attestation deadlines to avoid 11th hour fire drills.

Is your organization juggling MU requirements while switching EHRs? If so, I’m sure that you’ve found there are additional considerations surrounding an EHR switch that are important to keep in mind. I’d love to hear your suggestions in the comments.

Scanners – The Forgotten Device Series

Posted on November 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Far too often in healthcare IT we get so caught up talking about the big projects, big software systems, and huge hardware buys that we forget about many of the little guys that make so much difference in our lives. This isn’t always a bad thing. When $36 billion in government money is available, we should talk about EHR. Although, there are a bunch of little things that can impact an organization as much as the large projects.

In this series of posts, I want to look at the Forgotten Devices that can make or break a user’s healthcare IT experience but we sometimes forget about them. In most cases, these devices are used multiple times a day and can have a significant impact on the happiness of your healthcare organization. In some cases, these devices are hidden from view, but facilitate all of the work done in healthcare.

To start this series off, we’re going to look at: SCANNERS.
DR-M160
Scanners unfortunately seem to be an afterthought in most healthcare organizations. For some reason we have the false perception that once we move to EHR, we’ll be paperless and so the idea of needing a scanner is somewhat foreign. I know in my first EHR implementation I went cheap on the scanners as I underestimated the volume of scanning that would be required post-EHR implementation. I quickly learned post EHR implementation that I better rethink my scanner strategy.

The reality is that paper still plays a key role in every healthcare organization. It’s really romantic to think of the paperless healthcare environment. However, in many respects EHR software are great at printing out reams of paper. Not to mention paper signatures are still required in many environments. Plus, there are waves of paper coming in from outside your healthcare organization which has to be incorporated into your IT systems. A well implemented scanner strategy is the cornerstone to converting this paper into your IT systems.

The great part is that scanner technology has come a long way as well and comes in a variety of options. You can buy a scanner like the Canon DR-M160 all the way up to the Canon ScanFront 300P network scanner. All of these can handle the heavy workload that’s required in healthcare at a much more reasonable cost than we have ever had before.

Outside of the daily scanning needs, many organizations also have to apply a scanner workflow to their old paper charts. I won’t dig into all of the various approaches organizations take to scanning old paper charts since we’ve done so many times previously. However, many organizations still opt to scan the old paper charts in house. In fact, many still take a scan as you go approach to incorporating old paper records into their EHR. The same scanner you use to capture the daily paper inflow can also be used for this scan as you go approach. Certainly there are even higher volume scanners that can be used for scanning a whole chart room, but those really aren’t necessary for most healthcare organizations.

The other issue many people forget with scanners is doing regular scanner maintenance. This is not a hard task to do, but it will really impact the scanners effectiveness if you don’t do it regularly. There’s nothing more frustrating for an end user than putting the paper in the scanner and having it jam. You can imagine the frustration a busy nurse experiences when she tries to scan something and runs into a jam in the scanner. With proper maintenance, this issue can be generally avoided.

Another major challenge with scanning is handling the document workflow. Most EHR systems support the standard TWAIN driver that comes with most scanners today. This makes it really simple to scan directly into the patient chart. Otherwise, you can build really advanced workflows that are deeply integrated into the scanner software itself. In healthcare, the former is much more common than the later. However, it will be interesting to see how smart scanners continue to improve the scanning workflow.

As with most technology, you don’t need to focus on scanning every day, but it’s important to regularly consider your approach to scanning and whether it enhances or detracts from your workflow. Scanning will be an important part of every healthcare organization for the foreseeable future. If you don’t keep up with the latest scanning technology and regular scanning maintenance, it can have a negative impact on your end users’ experience. Nothing’s worse than hearing about a bad user experience that could have been avoided.

Sponsored by Canon U.S.A., Inc.  Canon’s extensive scanner product line enables businesses worldwide to capture, store and distribute information.

Helping the Small Practice Physician Survive with Dr. Tom Giannulli

Posted on November 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you haven’t seen, I’ve been doing a whole series of video interviews over on EHR Videos. There are some really great videos in the series chock full of insights into what’s happening in the world of EHR and Healthcare IT.

The following video is an example of the type of great video interviews we’ve been doing. In this interview, I talk with Dr. Tom Giannulli, CMIO of Kareo about how a well done EHR vendor can help a small practice physician survive. This has become a really popular topic for a number of ambulatory focused EHR vendors. Along with these topics, I ask Dr. Giannulli about the former Epocrates EHR he helped create which is now owned by Kareo and is offered as a Free EHR.

What do you think about Dr. Giannulli’s comments about helping the small practice physician survive? Will EHR vendors play an important role in making this happen? I look forward to seeing your thoughts in the comments.

A Patient Perspective on Meaningful Use

Posted on November 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I came across this great xtranormal video that looks at meaningful use from a patient’s perspective. I’ve posted some videos like this before. In fact, I’ve started creating a whole YouTube playlist of Funny Healthcare IT Videos. If you’re deep in the trenches of meaningful use, then you’ll enjoy this one (or not depending on how you look at it).