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EHR Post Acquisition, 2014 Certified, ICD-10 and the Amazing Charts Future with John Squire, President and COO

Posted on April 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had the chance to sit down and interview John Squire, President and COO of Amazing Charts. I was interested to learn about the transition Amazing Charts has experienced after being purchased by Pri-Med and the departure of Amazing Charts Founder, Jonathan Bertman. Plus, I wanted to learn why Amazing Charts wasn’t yet 2014 Certified and their plans to make it a reality. We also talk about the value of meaningful use and the ICD-10 delay. Then, we wrap up with a look at where Amazing Charts is headed in the future.

Check out EHR videos for all of my EHR and Healthcare IT interview videos and be sure to subscribe to the Healthcare Scene youtube channel.

fEMR Targets Pop Up Clinics’ Needs

Posted on April 29, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn’t rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Detroit’s Wayne State University students are pioneering fEMR, a special EMR for pop up clinics. These are transient clinics operating in under served areas with mass medical emergencies.

Beginning after Haiti’s devastating, 2010 earthquake, WSU’s undergraduate, medical students and doctors started staffing several pop ups. Operating with little or no electricity or other basic supports, these clinics often provide residents their only medical services.

Two volunteers, med student Erik Brown, and premed grad Sarah Draugelis, realized the need to create a basic medical record to aid their work and to print out for the patients. They looked at current EHRs, but they were far too complex, as Draugelis told Improvewsu.org,

We needed something that was fitted for high volume short-term clinics,” Draugelis explained. “We don’t have time to scroll and look at all the tabs in the EMR system. We need something very bare bones, very, very basic.” So, they looked into the EMR systems that already existed, but none of them fit the bill.

Last month, Brown and Draugelis told fEMR’s dramatic story on Live in the D TV show,

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

For help, the two turned to WSU Computer Science professor, Dr. Andrian Marcus, who recruited senior, Kevin Zurek, as technical lead.

fEMR is the result. Built using Play, a fast, light platform for web and mobile apps, fEMR incorporates a simple workflow of three steps: Triage, Medical and Pharmacy. Running on iPads, its tap and touch interface is designed for speed.

fEmr Triage Screen

fEmr Triage Screen

I contacted Zurek who gave me a login to their test site running on Chrome. It is, indeed, bare bones and fast. I created a patient, shown in the web shot above, and played with the package. Though a work in progress, it had no surprises, that is, no crashes, mysterious behavior, etc.

I asked Zurek what he sees as fEMR’s future? Are they going to take it commercial, etc.? He told me,

Our target audience generally consists of volunteers, so we have no concrete plans to commercialize fEMR as of right now. The purpose of fEMR is to bring continuity and increase efficiency in transient medical clinics while producing important data that can be used for research purposes.

In terms of the EMR system, we plan on delivering this to the end user in the most intuitive way possible, with as little training as possible. We have come to the conclusion that the best way to approach this is via an open environment that promotes collaboration across the board.

They need help to finish the work. Right now, they have two of six needed iPads. As befits the bootstraps nature of the project, they plan to raise funds with a car wash.

If you know some iPads that are a bit bored and looking for something more interesting to do, drop Zurek a line. He and the WSU team can keep them busy.

EHR Is Not Disruptive…And Never Will Be

Posted on April 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ben Wanamaker and Devin Bean have an outstanding blog post on the Disruptive Innovation blog (Clayton Christensen Institute for those following at home) called Why EHRs are not (yet) disruptive. If you care about the EHR market, you should go and give it a slow thorough read. Well worth pondering what they’re saying. For those who don’t want to read the whole article, here’s a small excerpt:

The reason EHRs are not “roiling the health care landscape” with disruption is not that the technology is bad—rather it’s the business model in which they are being implemented. While there is some evidence that EHRs can help increase clinical quality, the technology is by and large being crammed into sustaining business models and used as an expensive sustaining innovation to replace paper records with complex electronic systems. Implementing new technology to sustain the way you already make money almost always keeps costs high and prevents true disruption. Indeed, the history of innovation is littered with companies that had a potentially disruptive technology such as EHRs within their grasp but failed to commercialize it successfully because they did not couple it with a disruptive business model.

Plus, this powerful quote:

EHRs have little reason to use the new electronic system differently from the old paper system, and so EHRs often neither decrease cost nor increase quality. They’re just next year’s more expensive model of paper-based patient records.

As I read this I thought, EHR weren’t meant to be and they won’t ever be disruptive. In fact, they cement in the status quo. I think we see this playing out more and more every day.

To be disruptive, we’ll need something to come from outside of EHR. It likely will have to buck the current reimbursement model. Payers and government really control the environment. As Steve Case said at SXSW V2V, government is the biggest customer of healthcare. That makes disruption difficult unless you go outside the current system.

The disruptive technology that comes will in many ways feel like an EHR, but it won’t be an EHR like we know it. My point is that technology will disrupt healthcare and many in the EHR world will see the disruptive technology and say that it looks very much like the EHR software of today. However, what they won’t realize is that it’s not the technology, but the business model that’s paired with the technology that’s so disruptive.

Twitter EMR, EMR Patient Engagement, and EHR Screenshot

Posted on April 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


There’s definitely no way an EMR will be built on Twitter. However, a doctor’s view of a patient will likely incorporate social info like what’s posted to Twitter. Plus, if you look at the post itself, it’s describing more than a Twitter EMR. It’s describing a new way for a doctor to monitor and treat a patient. That’s a much larger shift that will be hard.


I love this insight from Dave Chase. He’s been deep in the depths of patient engagement for a while. The analogy he gives is worth diving in deeper.


I’ve been posting all the EHR Screenshots I can find for quite a while. The hospital ones are always the worst. I have hope when I look at some of the ambulatory ones. I’m trying to remember if I’ve seen a beautiful hospital EHR interface. I can’t remember one if I have.

Has EHR Become a Bad Brand?

Posted on April 25, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn’t rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

The other day, I had lunch at DC’s Soupergirl with the redoubtable Chuck Webster, workflow tool maven and evangelist. We talked a lot and discovered that both of us had a warm spot for the classic neighborhoods near Atlanta’s Piedmont Park. He as a transplant and I as a native.

More to this blog’s point, we discussed the state of EHRs and their numerous problems. Chuck wondered if EHR, per se, had become a bad brand? It’s a good question. Have we seen a once promising technology become, as has managed care, a discredited healthcare systems? It’s an easy case to make for a host of reasons, such as these:

Poor Usability. There are scads of EHRs in the marketplace, but few, if any, have a reputation as being user friendly. Whenever I first talk to an EHR user, I wait a few minutes while they vent about:

  • How they can’t put in or get out what they need to,
  • Their PCs being poorly located, inflexible or the wrong footprint,
  • Data that’s either missing, cut off or hard to find,
  • Logging in repeatedly,
  • Transcribing results from one system to put it in another,
  • Wading through piles of boilerplate, to get what they need etc., etc.
  • Having to cover PCs with sticky note workarounds.

As for patients, my friend Joe, a retired astrophysicist, is typical. He says when his doctor is on her EHR she doesn’t face him. She spends so much time keying, he feels like he’s talking to himself.

Now, it’s not completely fair to blame an EHR for how it’s implemented. The local systems folks get a lot of that blame. However, vendors really have failed to emphasize best practices for placing and using their systems.

Missing Workflows. EHRs, basically, are database systems with a dedicated front end for capturing and retrieving encounters and a back end for reporting. To carry out, their clinical role they have to be flexible enough to adapt to varying circumstances with a minimum of intervention.

For example, when you make an appointment for a colonoscopy, the system should schedule you and the doctor. It should then follow rules that automatically schedule the exam room, equipment, assign an anesthetist, and other necessary personnel, etc.

When you come in, it should bring up your history, give your doctor the right screens for your procedure, and have the correct post op material waiting. General business software workflow engines have done this sort of thing for years, but such functions elude many an EHR. EHRs without needed workflow abilities increase staff times and labor costs. They also mean users miss important opportunities and potential errors increase.

Data Sharing. Moving from paper to electronic records promised to end patient information isolation. Paper and faxed records can only be searched manually. However, with a structured electronic record, redundant entry would be reduced and information retrieval enhanced. Or so the argument went, but it hasn’t worked out that way.

While there are systems, such as the VA, Kaiser and various HIEs that fulfill much of the promise, it is still a potential rather than a reality for most of us. There are two basic reasons for this state of affairs: ONC’s mishandling of interchange requirements and one member of Congress’ misplaced suspicions.

ONC’s Role. ONC’s Meaningful Use program is meant to set basic EHR standards and promote data interchangeability.

When it comes to these goals, MU fell down from the start. MU1 could have been concise requiring an EHR to capture a patient’s demographics, vitals, chief complaint and meds.

Most importantly, MU could have made this information sharable by adopting one of HL7’s data exchange protocols. This would have given us a basic, national EHR system. Instead, MU focused on too many nice to have features, leaving data exchange way down the list.

ONC has tried to correct its data interchange a failing in MU2 to a degree, but it’s not there yet. Here’s what GAO, has to say about ONC’s efforts:

HHS, including CMS and ONC, developed and issued a strategy document in August 2013 that describes how it expects to advance electronic health information exchange. The strategy identifies principles intended to guide future actions to address the key challenges that providers and stakeholders have identified. However, the HHS strategy does not specify any such actions, how any actions should be prioritized, what milestones the actions need to achieve, or when these milestones need to be accomplished. GAO Report-14-242, March 24, 2014. Emphasis added.

Ron Paul. The other important obstacle to interchange came from Congress. When Congress passed HIPAA in 1996, it mandated that HHS develop a national, patient ID. However, in 1998 Ron Paul, (R-TX) deduced that since HHS wanted the ID system, it therefore wanted to put everyone’s medical records in a government database. He saw this as a threat to privacy. He got a rider added to HHS’s budget forbidding it to implement the ID system or even discuss one.

The ban’s remained in succeeding budgets. The rider has created a national medical data firewall for each of us, which hinders all of us. Paul’s gone from Congress, but Congress continues the ban. As Forbes’ Dan Munroe wrote about Paul’s ban:

The health data chaos we have today doesn’t allow for interoperability, portability or mobility. It’s why fax machines remain the ‘lingua franca” of U.S. healthcare. Every healthcare entity in the U.S. sees each patient, event and location as unique to them. For lack of a single identifier, there’s no easy or cost-effective way to coordinate patient care. Emphasis added.

While the lack of a patient ID is not EHRs fault, it noticeably reduces their ability to interchange information. State or other HIE’s are, in effect, workarounds for lack of a uniform ID. This situation adds to the perception of EHRs as unresponsive technology.

Onerous Agreements. As many an EHR buyer has found, vendors see EHRs as a sellers’ market. They use this to write onerous license agreements exempting their products from adhering to standards such as MU or from responsibility for costly errors or omissions.

These agreements not only limit liability, but often silence a buyer’s adverse comments. The effect is to cut buyers from any meaningful recourse. This shortsighted practice adds one more layer to the EHR industry’s image as unresponsive, self serving and defensive.

Whither the Brand?

The question then is are things so bad that EHR needs rebranding? If so, how should this be done by calling EHRs something else, advocating for a different technology, or yet another alternative?

For some brands, a new name along with some smart PR will do. That’s how Coca Cola reversed its New Coke fiasco. EHRs have a tougher problem. EHRs are not a one vendor product. They are a program class. Reforming EHR’s brand will take more than effective PR. It will take pervasive technical and policy changes.

Change From Where?

Change in a major technical field, as in public policy, requires either overcoming or going around inertia, habit, and complacency. EHRs are no exception. Here are some ways change could happen.

External Events. The most likely source of change is a crisis that brings public pressure on both the industry and government. There is noting like a tragedy to grab public attention and move decision makers off the dime. I don’t want it to occur this way, but nothing like a tragedy makes events go into fast forward and move issues from obscure to inevitable. Given EHRs many patient safety problems, this is all too likely an outcome.

ONC Initiative. ONC could step in and help right matters. For example, as I have advocated, ONC could run NIST’s usability protocols for all systems seeking MU certification. It could then publish the test results giving users a needed, common benchmark. This, in turn, could be a major push to get vendors to regard usability, etc., as an important feature.

ONC is not inclined to do this. Instead, it asks vendors to pick one of several versions of user centric technology. As Bennett Lauber, Chief Experience officer of The Usability People recently told HIEWatch:

“Usability certification for meaningful use really isn’t a test the way the rest of the certification process is. (Testers) go out and observe users, and report back to the certifiers,” Lauber reports. “There seem to be different sets of evaluation criteria because ONC has not really defined usability yet….” Emphasis Added.

Recently appointed ONC Coordinator, Dr. Karen Desalvo, unlike her predecessors, has been frank about changing ONC’s course. She’s revamped her advisory committee structure and spoken about going beyond meaningful use to big data.Notably, she understands the need for and the problems of interoperability. However, she’s not offered any changes in standards. ONC is in the best position to implement real standards, but for both political reasons; it’s unlikely to do so.

To chill things politically, vendors only have to find a few Congressmen who’ll, for a well placed contribution, will send ONC vendor drafted letters threatening its appropriation, committee reviews, etc. It can happen otherwise, but as Damon Runyon has said, “The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that’s the way to bet.”

User Revolt. The most notable user push back to the status quo has involved unilateral EHR vendor agreements.

As Katie Bo Williams of Healthcare Drive (edited by Hospital EMR and EHR’s Anne Zieger) has notably described, major lawsuits are costing some vendors dearly. The industry, however, has yet to set buyer agreement standards that could aid its and EHRs’ reputation.

These lawsuits might chastise vendors, but users will need to become bolder if they want change. EHR vendors have an association to protect their interests. So do hospitals, physicians, practice managers, etc. Users are the one group that’s not represented.

You may belong to this or that product’s user group, but there is no one group that looks after EHR user’s interest. If there were a well organized and led EHR user group that lobbied for better usability, workflow tools and universal data exchange etc., then these issues would become more visible. More importantly, users would be able to demand a place at the table when ONC, etc., makes policy.

Those interested in patient safety, too, are taking some new directions. Recently, ECRI convened the Partnership for Promoting Health IT Patient Safety to promote changes, within “a non punitive environment,” that is, in a collaborative setting among vendors, practioners, safety organizations, etc. While the group has not issued any reports, it offers two hopeful signs.

The group’s advisory panel includes experts, such as, MIT’s Dr. Nancy Leveson, who works in aeronautic and ballistic missile safety systems. The other factor is that the group has consciously sought to give vendors a place where they see the impact their products have on patient safety without the threat of litigation. Whether the group can bring this off and influence the market remains to be seen.

Technical Fix. It’s possible users may decide to fix EHR’s problems themselves. For example, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center  (UPMC) uses a combination of EPIC, Cerner and its own clinical systems. It wanted to pull patient information into one, comprehensive, easily used profile. To do this, the Center developed a new, tablet front end that overcomes a variety of common EHR problems.

Once a major actor, such as Pitt, shows there is a market, others will explore it. You’ll know it’s a real trend, when a major vendor buys a front end start up and brands it as its own.

Natural Turnover. Finally, John recently raised the question of EHRs’ future in What Software Will Replace EHR? He thinks that change will come organically as more technically robust software pushes out the old.

Slowly replacing current EHRs with new tools is the most likely path. However, a slow path may be the worst outcome. Slow turnover would give us a mixture of even more incompatible systems. This would make the XP installed base problem look simple.

The EHR brand reminds me of a politician with both high positives and negatives. It may be liked by many, however, it also has a lot of baggage. As with a candidate in that position, something will have to change those negatives or it will find itself just an also ran.

Healthcare IT Career Jobs and Advice

Posted on April 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Late last year I acquired Healthcare IT Central, a healthcare IT job board and career website and have since been diving into the health IT jobs and recruiting space. The site continues to grow at an amazing rate. We now are helping 20,568 job seekers find employment from over 800 health IT companies. In fact, 11,649 healthcare IT professionals have active resumes in our system and we send out a weekly Health IT eNewsletter each week to almost 16,000 Health IT professionals.

If you’re out there looking for a job in the Healthcare IT field, I recommend you register as a job seeker and search through our hundreds of healthcare IT jobs. All of this is offered for free to job seekers. It’s so incredibly satisfying to help thousands of people find a job in healthcare IT. Hopefully many readers of this site will find it helpful as well.

We also offer a number of resources for health IT employers that want to post their jobs, search our resume database for the right candidate or sponsor the weekly newsletter. A little birdie told me we might be rolling out a series of health IT career focused webinars as well.

Finding the right people for your organization is a really challenging task. However, once you find the right one, it’s incredibly satisfying as well.

Along with Healthcare IT Central’s job board, the Healthcare IT Today blog provides some really valuable health IT focused career content. Take a look at a few recent posts:

  • What Not to Do: Radio Silence – A great look at what not to do when searching for a job.
  • 4 Main Compensation Options for Health IT Consultants – A lot of people are considering switching jobs and becoming consultants. This post will give you a lot of insight on the different consultant payment options.
  • My Best Career Advice – This is part of the new “Ask Cassie” series where you can ask a health IT career question and Cassie Sturdevant will answer it in a future post. Feel free to ask in the comments of this post and I’ll forward it on to her as well.

I’ll admit that I’m still really new in the health IT recruiting, jobs and career space. However, I’ve enjoyed learning the various idiosyncrasies. If you have thoughts, ideas, or comments on the various sites, I’d love to hear them. I always love learning new things and making new connections.

Reality of Patient Engagement Infographic

Posted on April 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always love a good infographic. Boston Technology has put one out that looks at patient engagement. Which of the numbers on the infographic pops out to you?

Realities of patient engagement

Modern Information Technology Endorsed by Government Health Quality Agency

Posted on April 22, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Andy Oram, writer and editor at O’Reilly Media.

If you want to see a blueprint for real health reform, take the time to read through the white paper, “A Robust Health Data Infrastructure,” written by an independent set of experts in various areas of health and information technology. They hone in, more intently than any other official document I’ve seen, on the weaknesses of our health IT systems and the modernizations required to fix them.

The paper fits very well into the contours of my own recent report, The Information Technology Fix for Health. I wish that my report could have cited the white paper, but even though it is dated November 2013, it was announced only last week. Whether this is just another instance of the contrasting pace between technologists and a government operating in a typically non-agile manner, or whether the paper’s sponsor (the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) spent five months trying to figure out what to do with this challenging document, I have no way of knowing.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation played an important role organizing the white paper, and MITRE, which does a lot in the health care space, played some undescribed role. The paper’s scope can almost be described as sprawing, with forays into side topics such as billing fraud, but its key points concern electronic health records (EHRs), patient ownership of information, and health data exchange.

Why do I like this white paper so much? Two reasons. First, it highlights current problems in health information technology. The authors:

  • Decry “the current lack of interoperability among the data resources for EHRs” as leading to a “crippled” health data infrastructure (p. 2), and demand that “EHR software vendors should be required to develop and publish APIs for medical records data, search and indexing, semantic harmonization and vocabulary translation, and user interface applications” (p. 44).

  • Report with caution that “The evidence for modest, but consistent, improvements in health care quality and safety is growing.” Although calling these “encouraging findings,” the authors can credit only “the potential for improved efficiency” (p. 2 of the paper).

  • Warn that the leading government program to push health care providers into a well-integrated health care system, Meaningful Use, fails to meet its goals “in any practical sense.” Data is still not available to most patients, to biomedical researchers, or even to the institutions that currently exchange it except as inert paper-based documents (p. 6). The authors recommend fixes to add into the next stage of Meaningful Use.

  • Lament the underpopulated landscape of business opportunities for better interventions in patient care. “Current approaches for structuring EHRs and achieving interoperability have largely failed to open up new opportunities for entrepreneurship and innovation” (p. 6).

Second, the paper lays out eminently feasible alternatives. The infrastructure they recommend is completely recognizable to people who have seen how data exchange works in other fields: open standards, APIs, modern security, etc. There is nothing surprising about the recommendations, except that they are made in the context of our current disfunction in handling health information.

A central principle in the white paper is that “the ultimate owner of a given health care record is the patient him/herself” (p. 4), a leading demand of health reformers and a major conclusion in my own report. Patient control solves at one stroke the current abuse of patient data for marketing, and allows patients to become partners in research instead of just subjects.

The principle of patient control leads to data segmentation, a difficult but laudable attempt to protect the patient from bias or exploitation. Patients may want to “restrict access to certain types of information to designated individuals or groups only (e.g., mental health records, family history, history of drug abuse) while making other types of information more generally available to medical personnel (e.g., known allergies, vaccination records, surgical history)” (p. 33).

This in turn leads to the most novel suggestion in the paper, the notion of a “patient privacy bundle.” Because most people have trouble deciding how to protect sensitive parts of their records, and don’t want to cull through all their records each time someone asks for research data, the health care field can define privacy policies that
meet common needs and let patients make simple choices. Unfortunately, a lot of hurdles may make it unfeasible to segment data, as I have pointed out.

Other aspects of the white paper are also questionable, such as their blithe suggestion that patients offer deidentified data to researchers, although this does appeal to some patients as shown by the Personal Genome Project. (By the way, the authors of the white paper mischaracterized that project as anonymous.) Deidentification expert Khaled El Emam (author of O’Reilly’s Anonymizing Health Data) pointed out to me that clnical and administrative data involves completely different privacy risks from genomic data, but that the white paper fails to distinguish them.

I was a bit disappointed that the paper makes only brief mentions of patient-generated data, which I see as a crucial wedge to force open a provider-dominated information system.

The paper is very research-friendly, though, recognizing that EHRs “are already being supplemented by genomic data, expression data, data from embedded and wireless sensors, and population data gleaned from open sources, all of which will become more pervasive in the years ahead” (p. 5). Several other practical features of health information also appear. The paper recognizes the strains of storing large amounts of genomics and related “omics” data, pointing out that modern computing infrastructures can scale and use cloud computing in a supple way. The authors also realize the importance of provenance, which marks the origin of data (p. 28).

Technologists are already putting in place the tools for a modern health IT system. The white paper did not mention SMART, but it’s an ideal API–open source, government-sponsored, and mature–through which to implement the white paper’s recommendations. The HL7 committee is working on a robust API-friendly standard, FHIR, and there are efforts to tie SMART and FHIR together. The Data Distribution Service has been suggested as a standard to tie medical devices to other data stores.

So the computer field is rising to its mission to support better treatment. The AHRQ white paper can reinforce the convictions of patient advocates and other reformers that better computer systems are feasible and can foster better patient interventions and research.

Are Your Order Sets in Order?

Posted on April 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare transformation is driving healthcare providers to focus on quality, value-based purchasing and accountable care. While CPOE (computerized physician order entry) has become an important tool to meet their goals, a robust order set integrated within CPOE is critical.

A December 2013 HIMSS Analytics survey with responses from nearly 500 healthcare organizations highlighted the current state of healthcare providers’ order set deployment, use, and needs. Survey results revealed that the common challenges respondents faced with their order set solutions were lack of integration with an electronic health record (EHR) and lack of functionality and usability, both of which lead to underutilization and suboptimal clinical workflow.

The results of this survey and more order set analysis is found in this whitepaper called “The Importance of Order Sets.” I love the whitepaper’s analysis of order set integration with EHR software (and associated challenges) and the ability of organizations to update their order sets.

I think we’ve certainly seen an evolution in the world of order sets. When EHR first started, doctors were happy to create their own order sets. These EHR early adopters wanted to customize everything to their exact need. However, over time doctors have wanted to buy an EHR which just worked right out of the box. This included having order sets that are already ready to go and updated regularly without much work on their part. Plus, the early adopters have started to realize how quickly an order set can become outdated if its not looked at regularly.

Order sets are one part of the movement towards evidence based medicine. However, we need deeper integration with evidence based medicine guidelines and order sets into the EHR. This has to become a normal part of the workflow to be really effective. I’m excited that most EHR vendors are at the point where they can make this a reality.

You might be an #HITNerd If…

Posted on April 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You might be an #HITNerd If…

your vacation plans are all paired with health IT conferences.

Find all our #HITNerd references on: EMR and EHR & EMR and HIPAA and check out the new #HITNerd t-shirts, hat, and phone cases.

NEW: Check out the #HITNerd store to purchase an #HITNerd t-shirt of cell phone case.

Note: Much like Jeff Foxworthy is a redneck. I’m well aware that I’m an #HITNerd.