Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

EHR Consulting Jobs

Posted on May 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been learning a lot more about the life of an EHR consultant thanks to the addition of Healthcare IT Central’s job board to the Healthcare Scene family. Not to mention all of the amazing health IT career blog posts on Healthcare IT Today. For example, it was fun to read this Health IT consultant post from 2011 talking about the opportunity that would be available. That has certainly played out.

Take a look at some of the jobs posted by the top health IT consulting and health IT recruiting companies. Here are a few examples:

We’re really excited that Healthcare IT Central is the go to place for healthcare IT consulting jobs. As you can see we have the very best health IT companies posting their jobs. Plus, there are still a lot of healthcare IT jobs.

Of course, those are just a few of the companies that are posting jobs. If you’re looking for a health IT job, you may want to also search by a specific category of job:

One of the great things about working in healthcare IT is that it’s not going anywhere. It’s not like we’re going to stop providing healthcare to people. It’s not like we’re going to stop applying the benefits of technology in healthcare. We may not call it EHR in the future. We’ll figure out some other acronym, but at its core it will be the same. We’ll be applying the latest technology to improve healthcare. It’s a great thing to be apart of.

How To Respond to Data Breaches

Posted on May 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A lot of people have really liked this whitepaper on the 6 Reality Checks of HIPAA compliance. It’s a good download for those concerned about their HIPAA readiness. It will wake you up to the fact that you need to be ready and compliant with HIPAA.

Mac McMillan recently did a great HIPAA compliance interview with me where he said “A little bit of prevention goes a heck of a long way to preventing a bad event.” That’s great advice and if you read this whitepaper I think you’ll be woken up to the need to do a little more than you’re doing today to be HIPAA compliant.

While prevention is better, I was intrigued by this article (annoying registration required) in Health Data Management that talks about what to do in the event of a data breach. I love this quote from Rita Bowen, Senior VP at Healthport, “Breaches are inevitable.” It’s true. Despite your best efforts, breaches happen in every organization large and small.

Rita also points out that the key to a data breach is to have a system in place to “learn what went wrong and fix it.” I’ve always found HIPAA to be pretty generous with mistakes. As the HIPAA name says, it’s more about accountability than anything else. If you’re accountable for the decisions you’re making, then it’s more lenient than a lot of laws out there.

The article also gives three insights worth considering if you experience a data breach:

  • Honesty, the best policy
  • Keep Asking, “What if?”
  • Go the Extra Mile

All of these are great advice. If you go the extra mile and are honest about what happened, then you’ll usually be able to recover from a data breach. If you try and cover it up or hide what happened, then that will often come back to haunt you and damage you much more than if you were just honest and up front about what happened.

The Shift from Fee for Service to Outcomes-Driven Care Means Huge Opportunities

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Sadly there’s no video of a presentation that Shahid Shah recently did, but the slide deck embedded in this post is well worth a look. I believe it was the keynote presentation at the VAR Healthcare event. The presentation is chock full of insights into what’s happening in healthcare and healthcare IT.

Amazing Time Lapse EHR UX Design Video

Posted on May 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A big thanks to L-J Cunningham (@UXforHealth) for tweeting out this really cool time lapse video that shows SoftServe‘s work doing the UX design for the mEMR application. While the process they use is really cool to watch, it’s also interesting to see what a mobile EHR UI could look like.

TrueMU – When You Realize the MU Standards Are Too Low

Posted on May 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been writing about meaningful use a lot lately and the path forward for meaningful use. You may want to check out my post about Meaningful Use Being On the Ropes as one example. Although, even more important is this post about how meaningful use missed the patient engagement opportunity. Plus, my next post on LinkedIn is going to be about blowing up meaningful use.

In some ways, people are looking at what I write as a call to dumb down meaningful use. I don’t think that’s what I’m trying to do at all. I don’t think we should lower our standards of what we expect to get from EHR software. I just think that we should make it more meaningful. That’s why the example of patient engagement is an important one. A slight tweak to the meaningful use requirements and we’d actually get more patient engagement out of meaningful use for the same price.

I saw a great example of what I want to achieve in something called TrueMU by HelioMetrics. I think this line from their page says a lot:

“Healthcare providers are achieving Meaningful Use and realizing that standards are lower than the goals that they would like to set for their organizations.”

One of the problems with setting an expectation for people is that they then often go into default mode and just try to meet the expectation. This is happening with meaningful use. People see that as the standard they need to meet to be updated in their use of technology. If this artificial bar weren’t there, many of them would strive for even higher results.

The great part is that we can recognize this and fix it. We can think more strategically in how we’re using technology and achieve well beyond what’s defined in meaningful use. We just have to strategically make this part of our thinking.

I actually saw a lot of this happening with ICD-10. Many organizations saw ICD-10 and didn’t just choose to organize around trying to meet the ICD-10 standard. Instead, they created entire clinical documentation improvement (CDI) programs that would improve the quality of their documentation regardless of which standard they chose to use (or in this case chose to delay).

I wonder what results organizations are seeing when they stop focusing so much on meaningful use and instead focus on ways technology and EHR software can improve their organizations. If you have a story like this, I’d love to hear it.

Could Standard Interfaces for EHR Data Kill the EHR Business?

Posted on May 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was reading some people’s comments on a LinkedIn group and it sparked this interesting question:

If you can move healthcare data wherever we want it, then will the EHR’s have to change their business model?

I think this is a really important question. I’m sure that some will question whether we’ll be able to ever move healthcare data wherever we want it. I can’t remember the exact stat, but I recently saw that a huge percentage of the granular health data is stored in lab results. We’re already moving lab result data pretty well between systems. The same can be said for eRX. We’ve kind of cracked those nuts and eventually we’ll make the rest of the data available as well.

I think the answer to the question is that EHR vendors will have to change. I’m not sure they’ll have to change their business model per se, but they will have to change. The fact that a healthcare organization could take their healthcare data and go somewhere else will mean that an EHR vendor will have to be much more accountable to the software they produce and release.

I’ve often used the comparison on my blog. It is powered by WordPress and one of the great features of WordPress is that I can export my entire blog into one file and then import it wherever I want. This makes the cost of switching from WordPress to some other blogging platform simple.

While it’s really simple for me to change, I’m fiercely loyal to WordPress. Largely because WordPress has delivered a high quality product that keeps improving in the 9 years I’ve been using it. Just because I can switch products doesn’t mean I will switch.

The same very much applies to EHR software. Plus, there are other costs that won’t be recovered if I switch. For example, training costs and configuration costs. There are certainly plenty of reasons why someone wouldn’t want to switch EHR software even if they could get their data out. In fact, I’d argue that if you’re to the point where you’re willing to go through the hassle of switching EHR software, you should do it. It’s not easy to get that uncomfortable with an EHR software that you want to go through the hassle. Although, I guess a few might be naive to the EHR switching costs.

Long story short, I think standard interfaces for EHR data wouldn’t kill the EHR business, but it would cause it to change and change for the good. I’d welcome such a change. A few EHR vendors wouldn’t, but that actually is just another reason we should make it a reality. It would be the first thing on my list if I were to create a “meaningful certification.”

Do Doctors Care About the Triple Aim?

Posted on May 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The stated goal of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) (i.e. Obamacare) and healthcare reform is what people like to call the Triple Aim. For those not familiar with it, it goes as follows:

  • Improve patient satisfaction and quality of care
  • Improve the health of the community/population
  • Reduce the cost of healthcare.

I’ve regularly heard people reference the triple aim as a reason why we should act a certain way. They refer to the triple aim as the main goal of what we are doing with healthcare IT. It’s the unifying vision for which all of healthcare wants to achieve.

I’m here to tell you that it’s just not the case. There are plenty in healthcare that couldn’t care less about the triple aim of healthcare. Many in that group are doctors. Ok, maybe the word “care” isn’t the right one. They do care about patient satisfaction and quality of care. They do want the health of their community to be better. They do want the costs of healthcare reduced. They do care about those things, but do they care to the point where it will actually spur action?

Another way to look at this is do they care about the triple aim enough for them to change what they’re doing. Plus, do they care about other things more than the triple aim.

Let’s look at them backwards. Do doctors want to reduce the cost of healthcare? As citizens, of course they want the cost of healthcare reduced, but with one small caveat: As long as it doesn’t mean I get paid less. This isn’t a knock on doctors either. This is the perfectly rationale response to the idea of lowering costs in healthcare. It’s not something we should criticize. It’s something we should understand and apply to whatever we’re trying to achieve.

The same thing applies to improving the health of a community or population. Hopefully the shift to value based reimbursement, population health, and ACOs will help to realign the incentives to make it so doctors care more about this than they do now. Otherwise, many of these programs look like we’re asking our providers to provide more free work for the benefit of the community. Hard to blame them when you phrase it like that, no?

The majority of doctors embrace this first aspect of the triple aim. They really want to provide the very best care they can to the patients (with a few sad exceptions which give a bad name to the hundreds of thousands of doctors who are doing their best). The question I’d ask ourselves is are we putting doctors in a position where they can have satisfied patients who receive quality care or are we burdening our highest paid resource with tasks that don’t work towards this end goal? Every doctor I know would welcome the opportunity to have better satisfied patients and improved outcomes.

I love the components of the Triple Aim as an ideal, but as it is today I think there’s a misalignment between the ideal and the day to day reality for doctors. I’m not against being idealistic and ambitious in our goals. Although, don’t expect our healthcare system to reach the triple aim if we don’t realign the incentives. Plus, let’s not forget that not all incentives are financial.

EHR Blogger Attrition

Posted on May 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Someone at HIMSS asked me who the up and coming healthcare IT bloggers were in the industry. It was an interesting question. It’s not really sexy to start an EHR blog right now. The golden age of EHR blogging is over and I’m interested to know where EHR and healthcare IT blogging is going to go in the future. The good part is that the use of technology to improve healthcare is never going to go away. It may not be called EHR, but we’ll always be working with the latest technology that can make healthcare better.

As I look through the list of health IT and EHR bloggers on HITsphere, It’s really interesting to see how many bloggers have stopped blogging in the 8.5 years since I started.

Even more than dedicated health IT and EHR bloggers, we’ve seen a lot of company bloggers basically stop as well. For example, I miss seeing Evan Steele’s weekly posts on the EMR Straight Talk blog. Of course, he’s now moved on from the day to day of SRSsoft. I guess that’s a natural part of the cycle, but it’s too bad a company doesn’t continue on with the blog. (UPDATE: After Evan Steele posted a transition post and the people at SRSsoft have taken up and continued with regular blog posts from the new CEO and also many of their staff. I love when there’s a culture of blogging at a company. Nice work SRSsoft) Not that keeping a blog with fresh content is easy. It’s not.

There are still quite a few bloggers that started blogging about the same time as me and are still doing their thing. A few that come to mind include: Neil Versel, HIStalk, Healthcare IT Guy, Lab Soft News, and Christina’s Considerations.

That’s not to say that there aren’t still some great health IT blogs out there. There are still quite a few good ones, but not many new ones. Knowing that I’ll anger some people I don’t list (feel free to mention your blog in the comments and I’ll see about doing a future post with ones not listed here) here are a few of the ones I think do great work: Manage My Practice, Health System CIO, Chilmark Research, and HITECH Answers.

I just remembered this CDW list of Top 50 health IT blogs. It has some other good ones as well. Although, I might be bias since 8 of the 50 are part of Healthcare Scene. I’d love to hear what other blogs you read or places you go for great content.

EMR Nurses’ Wishes, Doing Good, and Good-Better-Best EHR

Posted on May 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Seems fitting to start off our Twitter roundup with a nurse related tweet for Nurse Week. Lisa makes an interesting comment in this tweet. Unfortunately, most of the EHR effort is focused on the doctors and not nearly enough time on the nurses. When you look at the nurse interface of many EHR, it feels like an afterthought. It’s too bad since they spend so much of their work life in the EHR.


I wrote this post over on EMR and HIPAA, but I wanted the readers of EMR and EHR to read it as well. I think this is an important question for all of us. What good can we do? Can we do more than we’re doing today?


The concept of Good, Better and Best EMR is a really interesting question. We all know that there are good, better and best EMR, but there’s no really good way to know which EMR falls into which category. Plus, it changes based on an individual clinic or hospital’s environment. I wish I knew an easier way to tell the difference.

Meaningful Use is On the Ropes

Posted on May 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re entering a really interesting and challenging time when it comes to meaningful use. We’ve often wrote about the inverse relationship between incentive and requirements that exists with meaningful use. As meaningful use stage 2 is now becoming a reality for many organizations and EHR vendors, the backlash against it is really starting to heat up.

If you don’t think this is the case, this slide from the HIT Policy Committee presentation says it a lot when it comes to organizations’ view of meaningful use stage 2.

Meaningful Use Stage 2 Attesatation - May 2014

For those that can’t believe what they’re reading, you’re reading it right. 4 hospitals have attested to meaningful use stage 2 and 50 providers as of May 1st. Certainly it’s still relatively early for meaningful use stage 2, but these numbers provide a stark contrast when you think about the early rush to get EHR incentive money during meaningful use stage 1.

This article by Healthcare IT News goes into many of the strains that were seen in the HIT Policy Committee. Sounded like the healthcare IT version of Real Housewives. However, the point they’re discussing are really important and people on both sides have some really strong opinions.

My favorite quote is this one in reply to the idea that we don’t need EHR certification at this point: “Deputy national coordinator Jacob Reider, MD, disagreed. Ongoing certification is required to give physicians and hospitals the security they need when purchasing products.”

Looks like he stole that line from CCHIT (see also this one). What security and assurance does EHR Certification provide the end user? The idea is just so terribly flawed. The only assurance and security someone feels buying a certified EHR is that they can get the EHR ID number off the ONC-CHPL when they apply for the EHR incentive money. The EHR certification can’t even certify EHR to a standard so that they can share health data. EHR Certification should go away.

I’m also a huge fan of the movement in that committee to simplify and strip out the complexity of meaningful use. I wish they’d strip it down to just interoperability. Then, the numbers above would change dramatically. Although, I’ve learned that the legislation won’t let them go that simple. For example, the legislation requires that they include quality measures.

No matter which way they go, I think meaningful use is in a tenuous situation. It’s indeed on the ropes. It hasn’t quite fallen to the mat yet, but it might soon if something dramatic doesn’t happen to simplify it.