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How Doctors Can Make Use of Social Media?

Posted on June 17, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Alex Tate.
alex
By using the right strategy doctors can gain a lot by making a proper use of social media to market themselves, share their rich experience and knowledge and carry out discussions with the colleagues in the industry.

Many of the doctors are afraid of the unknown and thus decide to remain silent over the social media due to privacy concerns. It is possible to create a good balance between having a transparent communication and matching to the necessary limitations of the industry.  Around 24% of physicians use social media at least once a day to post, share and seek medical information. The use of social media is still in its early years and it is a great opportunity to take advantage of these digital platforms and build credibility for your career as a doctor or a physician. The medical industry is very less saturated online as compared to other industries mainly due to the fear and apprehensions of health care organizations and professions as they would want to avoid liability issues related to social media related platforms.

As a doctor it is possible to make an effective and profitable social media strategy to market your practice and career. It will require a lot of time and effort but the results can have a far reaching effect for the long term success. If you are a physician or a doctor there are many ways you can make yourself stand out among others and effectively reach the right people in your social media.

  1. Set up personal account in Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

Having social media accounts is one of the ways to increase your social footprint and expand it. Make a personal profile in all these three networks and optimize them to the fullest.

  1. Make Use of Visuals

Visuals are more effective in engaging people than text therefore include more pictures in your social media profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. This is one of the important things to implement on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. When you are sharing content make sure you use original and non copyrighted photography in order to boost your engaging posts. Another way is to make use of photos in the blog posts, videos and articles when you are posting things on these networks.

  1. Share the knowledge

It doesn’t matter that which platform you are sharing your content on but make sure you whatever you are saying is helping you to make connections, followers and friends. Make use of your unique expertise and share the relevant information about what you know best.

Apart from joining the existing twitter chats, LinkedIn groups and relevant online discussion related to your area of expertise and industry, plan and start your own sharing hub on social media in order to bring the depth of knowledge to your professional interests.

Whether your knowledge hub is a LinkedIn Group, Twitter chats, Google plus profile or other relevant discussions online related to your industry, it is an important way of sharing what you know and build your credibility as you educate others.

As doctors it is important that you follow the rule of thumb to make sure you are providing the value to others and making use of your time spent on the social media networks. Doctor’s job is to make sure they share their expertise and execute their advice.

  1. Frequency of posting on LinkedIn

As one of the largest network of professionals online LinkedIn allow doctors to highlight each aspect of their career path using text and visuals. LinkedIn can offer lots of benefits to doctors because of its professional nature and a large network of likeminded people sharing and connecting with others. Begin by sharing the content from your profile that reflects your expertise and knowledge as a healthcare professional.

On LinkedIn content needs to be of a professional nature and little more reserved than the one shared on Facebook or Twitter. Share the links to those articles and other information that can be of some value to your connections and at the same time adding your own perspectives through commenting on posts.

  1. Follow other Healthcare Professionals on Social Media

Using Facebook and Twitter you can reach out to existing network of your contacts that you already know and you can find them by searching for colleagues, peers and friends working in the healthcare field. Follow and make connection with these individuals. After that you can use each networks search feature for to look for individuals in the similar role or industry. By connecting with a large number of people on these platforms you will have the like- minded people to interact with and share your views and experiences.

  1. Participate in conversations on twitter

Twitter is the best social media platform for having a public one to one conversation at the basic level. Start your conversation with doctors and medical professionals and discuss current trends in healthcare industry or new findings.

You can also find the conversations from other you have followed by searching through hashtags or keywords related to your interests a physician

  1. Join Useful Twitter Chats

In twitter chats, on particular topics and hash tags occurs weekly, monthly or quarterly. Search and discover what chats Twitter chats are available for medical professionals and join these conversations with other participants and learn new things. When participating in the twitter chat answer some of the questions asked by participants or posted by moderators by adding your views and opinions. Follow other participants and moderators in the chat and include proper hash tags in all of your tweets.

  1. Go For Accuracy

There is a large amount of misinformation online when it comes to medical field that confuses consumers and dilutes the effectiveness of accurate medial insights. As a doctor it is important that you act as the voice of reason when sharing important information about healthcare online. Go for accurate coverage of information on social media that could affect your credibility for the long term.

Spend a limited time on social media at a certain part of the day or few times a week to help you make your efforts to be more accurate. Again it needs to be quality over quantity when it comes to content sharing and the discussions that you are having online.

  1. Ask Questions

One of the benefits of having social media is the ability to have actual conversations online with your friends, family, peers and other connections in your network. As a doctor you should ask questions from your audience in order to get their feedback on some decision or a perspective on industry news.

As you will ask questions you will be able to learn the insights of your network. No one knows everything but still someone has something to share with others. Make use of your network on social media to get more insights and establish your credibility as respected and reputed doctor.

About Alex Tate

I am a health IT consultant with experience in management and training consultants across private and public sectors. I frequently write on Health IT for various blogs and websites. I am currently managing ehrsoftware.info website that helps practices and physicians select the right EHR. If you wish to connect with me follow me at https://twitter.com/alextate07

Will Outsourcing VA Care Monkey Wrench VistA?

Posted on June 16, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com.For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manager doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst, a role he recently repeated for a Council member.

The mess over the VA’s waiting times, with luck, will sort itself out with a revised management team and, perhaps, enough money to hire long needed staff.

One solution that’s pending in Congress is to let vets go outside the VA for care. From what I’ve read, most vets like the VA’s care and don’t want to change the main program, just fix it. However, that’s going to take time. The scandal has been around for a long time, at least since 2005 according to the VA’s Inspector General:

The issues identified in current allegations are not new. Since 2005, the VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued 18 reports that identified, at both the national and local levels, deficiencies in scheduling resulting in lengthy waiting times and the negative impact on patient care. As required by the Inspector General Act of 1978, each of the reports listed was issued to the VA Secretary and the Congress and is publicly available on the VA OIG website.

Given the VA’s size and complexity as well as the need to recruit new staff and implement new procedures, permitting vets to use other resources has much appeal that crosses party lines. Two politically apart Senators, Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and John McCain (R-AZ)  started the change with their bill to allow outside care and more:

The Sanders-McCain legislation addresses the short-term problem of access to care by authorizing a two-year trial program that would allow veterans to seek private health care if they reside more than 40 miles from a VA facility or have been waiting more than 30 days for treatment. Long-term, the legislation authorizes the construction of 26 medical facilities in 18 states, and directs $500 million in unspent funds to hire more doctors and other health-care providers.

The House voted for outside providers, but killed any funding changes. The Senate passed the Sanders-McCain bill by a 93 to 2 vote. The next step is uncertain. One house could simply accept the other’s version, which is unlikely. The other alternative is a conference committee, which can draft its own version for both houses to vote on. Given the urgency, though, it’s probable that something will pass before long.

Wither VistA?

The fix, however, may unfix one of the VA’s strengths. It could create a medical record continuity problem separating vets from their records leaving VistA EHR, which tracks veterans healthcare, in the lurch.

How will vets’ records follow them to outside docs? Vets could download their records with Blue Button, but would local docs know what to do with them? When a vet’s encounter is over, how will the information get back to VistA, if at all.

Vets have a single, relatively well functioning medical record system. Here’s hoping the price of needed care doesn’t foul up what’s been working right.

Healthcare Cloud Infographic

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you know, I always love a good infographic. This one does a decent job showing where we’re at in healthcare’s view of the cloud. Basically, cloud is a part of healthcare and will be forever. Watch for that trend to continue.

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How Trust Communities Enable Direct Networks

Posted on June 13, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

Have you noticed the DTAAP-Accredited logos on your Direct provider’s web site?  These indicate the vendor has successfully completed the related audits stipulating a high bar of security and privacy practices established by DirectTrust.  DirectTrust was spawned from a Direct Project workgroup, and is a non-profit trade organization which establishes best practices and oversees accreditation programs for the businesses providing Direct-related services, in association with EHNAC.  In addition to HISPs, the DTAAP program also accredits Certification Authorities (CAs) and Registration Authorities (RAs). The HISP, CA and RA roles can be performed by the same organization. Most Direct Messaging CAs operate in only in the Direct space, but a few also issue certificates in the general public internet space, as well.

Direct Certificates are issued by CAs who follow a regular procedure to put their stamp of approval on a digital identity and its corresponding cryptographic key used for securing Direct messages.  This process is complemented by that of a Registration Authority, who performs the actual vetting of individuals and often the archival of related documentation as well.  Level of Assurance (LoA) is another term used a lot in the Direct space. Depending on the degree to which an individual’s identity has been vetted, and how certificates are managed and accessed by users, a Direct Exchange transaction can be assigned a Level of Assurance. When exchanging health information between providers, for example, you want a high Level of Assurance that the party you’re exchanging with is, in fact, the same party whose name is listed on the corresponding digital certificate.

HISPs who are either accredited or are at least part-way down that path may seek inclusion of the corresponding CA’s trust anchor in DirectTrust’s anchor bundle, a collection of trust anchors for Direct communication published and regularly updated by DirectTrust.  Since Direct messaging is based on bidirectional trust, the Participating HISPs can rely on the Transitional Trust Bundle to provide their customers with a uniform and up-to-date network of interconnected senders and receivers. The DirectTrust bundle consists of trust anchors representing a large portion of the EHR community.

These HISPs make up the DirectTrust Network, a so-called “trust community”. There are other trust communities such as those managed by the Automate the BlueButton Initiative (ABBI), with corresponding Provider- and Patient-centered bundles.  Trust communities and their corresponding trust bundles serve an important purpose, because Direct messages are only exchanged successfully between trusted Direct Exchange partners. Remember that if one party does not trust the other, the messages are dropped silently, and automating loading and maintenance of trust anchors for a community using a trust bundle sure beats manual loading and unloading of each of these anchors by each of the members, or other old-style one-off interfaces between systems.

So, to get the most out of Direct, climb out of your silo and go join a trust community today!

 

Direct Messaging: The Logistics of Exchange

Posted on June 12, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

Once you enable digital health data exchange via Direct instead of by fax, you’ll want to share your address with other providers, so you no longer have to deal with all those pesky scanned attachments, subtly linked to electronic patient records.

Direct directories are enabling address lookup to meet this need, and you can also let your most common business partners know your address by including it on document templates you already exchange today, so they can begin to exchange with you via Direct when they’re ready.  You can also contact your referring docs using another method you trust (such as the fax where you usually send them medical records, or their business phone number) to ask for their Direct address.

It’s wise to confirm expectations with exchange partners about the use cases/data payloads for which you intend to exchange via Direct, as Direct isn’t used just like email by everyone.  Some will use Direct solely for Transitions of Care and patient Transmit, others may use it for Secure Messaging with patients, and still other providers will be happy to conduct general professional correspondence with patients and other providers over Direct.  This service information may or may not be reflected in the first provider directories.  And even within the Transitions of Care use case, if standards aren’t implemented for optimal receiving, a sending system may generate a CCDA (Continuity of Care Document) with a subtly different structure than a receiving system is able to completely digest.  So, just a heads up as you receive your first message or two from a system with whom you haven’t exchanged before: you’ll want to carefully monitor what data is incorporated by the receiving system and what is not, and you may need to iterate slightly between sender and receiver to get the data consumption right.  You’ll still be miles ahead of the custom interfaces model.

All in all, Direct is easy to use and is working much better than the naysayers would have you believe.  Direct software follows the specification outlined in the document lovingly known in the industry as the “Applicability Statement”, crafted by consensus through a public/private collaborative effort known as the “Direct Project” and led by the Office of the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology (ONC).   Direct Project volunteers have also written reference implementations following this specification which have been used by many HISPs and EHRs as the basis for their own Direct offerings.  Other private entities have developed their own APIs and implementations of the protocol from scratch.  These different systems and varying configurations regularly test and collaborate with each other, to make Direct work as seamlessly as possible for the end users.  Because the whole system only works as well as our joint efforts, HISPs (Health Information Service Providers who provide Direct services) within the DirectTrust Network take interoperability seriously and work together to iron out any kinks.

A tremendous amount of collaboration is taking place to bring interoperability to fruition for Direct’s well-established standards and policies, and this work is producing a larger and more robust network each day.

What Does Direct Messaging Look Like for MU2?

Posted on June 11, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

I’m often asked what EHR integrations of Direct are supposed to look like.  In the simplest sense, I liken it to a Share button and suggest that such a button—typically labeled “Transmit”—be placed in context near the CCDA that’s the target of the transmit action, or in a workflow-friendly spot on a patient record screen.

Send a CCD Using Direct Messaging

Send CCD using Direct in OpenEMR

The receive side is similarly intuitive: the practice classifies how their incoming records are managed today and we map that process to one or more Direct addresses.  If we get stuck, I ask, “What is the workflow for faxes today–how many fax numbers are there, and how are they allocated?”  This usually helps clear things up:  as a starting point, a Direct address can be assigned to replace each fax endpoint.

The address structure raises an important question, because it is tightly tied to the Direct messaging user interface.  Should there be a Direct address for every EHR user?  Provider?  Department? Organization?  A separate address for the patient portal?  A patient portal that spans multiple provider organizations? One for every patient?

The rules around counting Direct messages for Transitions of Care (ToC) attestation do not require each provider to have their own Direct address, as long as the EHR can count transactions correctly for attestation.  As far as meaningful use is concerned, any reasonable address assignment method should be acceptable in ToC use cases (check the rules themselves, for full details).  Here are some examples.

records@orthodocs.ehrco-example.com is clearly an address that could be shared by multiple users, though it could be used by just one person, and might be used for both transitions of care and patient portal transmit.

janesmith@orthodocs.hisp-example.com could also be dual-purpose.  Jane might be the only authorized user of this address, or this address may be managed by a group of people at her practice that does not necessarily even include Jane.  Alternatively, this address could be used for Jane’s ToC transactions, while a patientportal@someother.domain-example.com address could be used for patient portal transmit.

So, any of the options proposed above are possible conventions for assigning Direct addresses.  Also, a patient does not need their own Direct address to Transmit from as part of the View, Download, Transmit measure (170.314(e)(1)), but might have their own address to transmit to.  Note that adding a little extra data can elevate a View, Download, Transmit implementation to BlueButton+ status.

It makes sense for patients and providers to have their own Direct addresses if they are using Direct for Secure Messaging – 170.314(e)(3) – for which Direct is an optional solution.  Or, if patients have their own Personal Health Record (PHR) and Direct address, Direct is a great way to deliver data to the PHR.  Incidentally, there are free services such as Microsoft HealthVault and many others that issue patient Direct addresses.

Direct addresses are nearly indistinguishable from regular email addresses, but a word of caution: Direct is incompatible with regular email, and has additional requirements beyond traditional S/MIME.  Although it’s not a requirement, you’ll often find the word “direct” somewhere in the domain part of a Direct address, to help distinguish a regular email address from a Direct address.

Now that you know what Direct is, and what Direct Messaging and Direct addresses look like, I’m sure you’ll start noticing Direct popping up in more and more places.  So, be a not-so-early adopter and go get yourself a Direct address!

What is Direct?

Posted on June 10, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

John’s Update: Check out the full series of Direct Project blog posts by Julie Maas:

The specialist down the street insists he wants to receive your primary care doctor’s referrals, but only if it’s digital: “Sure, I’ll take your paper file referral sent via fax. But the service will cost an extra $20, to pay the scribe to digitize the record so I can properly incorporate the medical history.”

Does it really sound that far off? Search your feelings, Luke…

Will getting medical treatment using paper records soon be like trying to find somewhere to play that old mix tape you only have on cassette?  Sound crazy?  Try taking an x-ray film to a modern radiology department, and see if they still have a functioning light box anywhere to look at it.  It’s all digital now.

There are, of course, other factors.

Because MU2.

Because nobody, and I mean no small company and no large company, wants to be referred to as a data silo anymore.

Direct Exchange is a way of sending and receiving encrypted healthcare data, and certified EHRs must be able to speak it, beginning this year.  Adoption of Direct is increasing rapidly, and its secure transfer enables patient engagement as well as interoperability between systems that were previously dubbed silos.  Here is a brief overview of where Direct is currently required in the context of MU2 (please refer to certification and attestation requirements directly, for full details):

Certified ambulatory and acute EHRs need to use Direct for Transitions of Care (170.314(b)(1) and (b)(2)). They have to be able to Create a valid CCDA and Transmit it using Direct, and they have to be able to use Direct to Receive, Display, and Incorporate a CCDA. In the proposed MU 2015, the Direct piece may be de-coupled from the CCDA piece and modularized for certification purposes, but the end to end requirement would remain the same.

EHRs or their patient portal partner additionally need to demonstrate during certification that patients can View, Download, and Transmit via Direct their CCDA or a human readable version of it.  Yes, you heard correctly, I said patients.  As in patient engagement.

So, how does a healthcare provider get Direct?

1. Get a Direct account through your Direct-enabled EHR vendor

One way HIT vendors offer Direct is through a partnership with one or more HISPs (OpenEMR, QRS, Greenway, and others).  Others run their own HISPs (Cerner, athenahealth, and others).

2. Get a Direct account through an XD* HISP that’s connected to your EHR

HIT vendors alternatively enable access to Direct through an XD* plug-and-play (mostly) connector.  These “HISP-agnostic” EHRs allow healthcare organizations a choice between multiple XD*-capable HISPs when meeting MU2 measures (MEDITECH, Epic, Quadramed, and other EHRs have implemented Direct this way).  EMR Direct, MaxMD, Inpriva, and a few other HISPs offer XD* HISP services; not every HISP offers XD* service at this time.  Of course, there is a trade-off between this flexibility and the extra legwork required of the practice or hospital in setting up Direct.

3. Get a web-based or email client-based Direct account not tethered to an EHR or Personal Health Record (PHR)

 

Direct doesn’t have to be integrated into an EHR to transfer information digitally. Non-tethered accounts cannot attest to the sending side of (b)(2) nor the receiving side of (b)(1) on their own, but they can be Direct senders and receivers nonetheless, participating in Transitions of Care or data transfer for other purposes.  They may also be used to exchange health data with patients, billing companies, pharmacies, or other healthcare entities who are Direct-enabled. In fact, some very compelling use cases involve systems who may not have their own EHR, but want to receive digital transitions of care—one such example is skilled nursing facilities.

By the way, patients are also an integral part of the Direct ecosystem.  Several PHRs are already Direct-enabled, and more are on the way.

So, go digital and get your Direct address, and begin interoperating in the modern age!

Health Datapalooza 2014 Recap

Posted on June 9, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

The Health Datapalooza conference is ripe with opportunities to inspire and be inspired.  At any given session or lunch, the developer of an emerging app is seated at your left, and the winner of some other developer challenge a few years ago is on your right.  The vibe is a bit frenetic, in a good way.

At this conference, data geeks get right down to the business of discussing controversial and innovative healthcare data issues.  Nothing is watered down.  Even the Director of NIH Francis Collins, whom everyone wanted to hear play his guitar and sing, charged right in with data-rich graphs and statistics.  Jeremy Hunt of the UK offered sobering yet transparent error figures, encouraging the use of data to learn from and improve upon our safety practices at the point of care.  Keynotes from Jonathan Bush and Todd Park alleviated any need for caffeine, even though there was plenty on hand.  Countless application developers told truly compelling stories of their solutions.  Kathleen Sebelius challenged us to reconsider “the way we’ve always done it”.

What’s not to love?

I had hoped we would dive deeper into interoperability issues such as consistent data transport and payload standards.  Or, how a sensitive dependence on initial conditions such as protocol specifications, as in chaos theory, can lead to unexpected behaviors in pairwise HISP (Direct Exchange service provider) interoperability, seemingly at random.  Our data needs to be free to move about the care continuum, in order to be the most useful to us.  Gamification was suggested as a way to help patients adhere to medications.  Perhaps it could also encourage Healthcare IT companies to better adhere to specifications?

Silo was another buzzword that was used a lot last week.  That is to say, it’s a buzzword you don’t want to be associated with.  It was reassuring that we’ve set expectations properly around interoperability.  Fortunately, silos are going the way of the beeper and the booth babe.

There were some well-received promises of intense BlueButton promotion in the fall by Dr. Oz and several others.  I was also really encouraged to see the BlueButton Toolkit site preview on Sunday.  Look for more information about this when it goes live, and be sure to send Adam Dole your suggestions.  Great work, Adam!

Maybe next year at Health Datapalooza, we’ll talk about structuring the data collected by wearable devices, since we certainly heard this year about how integral to wellness quantified self is expected to be.  Quantified self and interoperability might even be considered as separate award categories in the Code-A-Palooza contest next year.  This could lead to more diversity and creativity in developers’ solutions, while helping to spur patient engagement and data transfer.

Countless examples of knowledge gleaned from large datasets, that could be used to make better medical decisions, were cited.  But this information hasn’t yet been integrated into day to day clinical workflow in a way that’s helpful to individual patients.  There’s no single source of individualized, analytics-enabled tools for patients to guide medical decision-making today.  But there will be!

Next Week’s Guest Blogger – Julie Maas from EMR Direct

Posted on June 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Next week, it’s going to be a little different around here. Next week, I’m going to be spending the week at Zions National Park as part of a family reunion. We did this a couple years back and unless things have changed, I’ll be stuck completely off the grid with no wifi or even cell coverage (Although, I may slip into town one day to check my email). Should be quite the experience.

I’ve actually done this a few times before and you probably didn’t know it. I just schedule the posts to appear and no one even realized I was gone. In fact, when I’ve done it in the past, I’ve had some of my highest traffic days on the blog. Don’t ask me how that works.

Next week, I decided to do something a little bit different. When I first started blogging, I remember a blogger “turning over the keys” to his blog to another blogger for the week. I always thought that was a kind of cool idea. Usually the person who “drives” the blog for the week enjoys it, the readers get another perspective, and the blog keeps humming while I’m wrestling 4 children and 12 cousins in the wilderness.

While I’m away, I’m handing the keys over to my favorite HIMSS 2014 discovery, Julie Maas. Before HIMSS this year, I’d certainly interacted with Julie a number of times on Twitter, but I’d never really gotten to know her and what she did. Needless to say, once I met her in person and heard her story I was utterly impressed with her and what she’s doing in healthcare IT. Side Lesson: Don’t judge a person solely by their Twitter account or Twitter interactions. There’s usually a lot more to them.

As I consider who I trusted with the keys to this blog, I wondered if Julie would be willing to share her knowledge, expertise and perspective. For those who don’t know Julie (shame on you), she’s been living, eating, breathing and sleeping the Direct Project for the company she started EMR Direct.

I’ve heard really promising things about Direct Project, but have never dug into it like I should have done. So, I’m as excited to read Julie’s series of posts next week as any of you. She’s also going to throw in a little Health Datapalooza commentary as well. I’ll be interested to hear what you think of Direct Project after reading Julie’s posts.

I hope you’ll give Julie a warm welcome to the blog next week. If you like this idea, maybe we’ll do it again. If you hate it or Direct Project, then we’ll be back with our usual snark the week after.

Now, what’s the ICD-10 code for internet withdrawal?

Atul Gawande Ted Talk on How We Heal Medicine

Posted on June 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Maybe I’m just excited about hearing Atul Gawande in person at ANI in a few weeks, but I just spent 20 minutes listening to his Ted talk on “How We Heal Medicine.” While he’s known for his work with checklists, I found his other insights into healthcare really refreshing. I’ve embedded the video below and pulled out some of his best quotes at the bottom of this post.

“We’re in the deepest crisis of medicines’ existence due to something you don’t normally think about when you’re a doctor concerned with how you do good for people, which is the cost of healthcare.”

“We have now found treatments for nearly all of the tens of thousands of conditions that a human being can have…We’ve now discovered 4000 medical and surgical procedures. We’ve discovered 6000 drugs that I’m now licensed to prescribe.”

“As Doctors, we can’t know it all. We can’t do it all by ourselves.”

“We in Medicine, I think, our baffled by this question of cost. We want to say, this is just the way it is. This is what Medicine requires.”

“Complexity requires group success.”