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New Eligibility Exclusions in the MACRA Final Rule – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

Last week on Friday, we posted the various resources available for the MACRA Final Rule. As you can imagine, one weekend isn’t nearly enough time to process what’s in the final rule. It’s going to take weeks to really get through it all. In fact, we might take a few weeks off from MACRA Monday to process it all.

That said, we wanted to do a quick post this MACRA Monday to talk about the new eligibility requirements and thresholds in the MACRA final rule. For reference, here’s our previous post that looked at MIPS eligibility in the MACRA proposed rule.

In the final rule, it looks like there are still 3 categories of exceptions: new doctors, low medicare volume and participation in an advanced APM. The big change in the MACRA final rule is what is considered low medicare volume. In the proposed rule it said, “$10,000 and providers care to 100 or fewer Medicare patients in a year.” Note the “and” in that requirement. In the MACRA final rule it excludes doctors with less than or equal to $30,000 in Medicare Part B allowed charges or less than or equal to 100 Medicare patients.” Note the “or” and the move from $10k in Medicare volume to $30k in Medicare volume.

With these three exceptions, Andy Slavitt sent the following tweet:

I quickly commented, “Now you’re going to get the small practices complaining that they were excluded from the incentives. #MACRA #CantWin” CMS’s MACRA executive summary says that they considered allowing those that were below these levels to opt into MIPS if they desired, but they “determined that it was inconsistent with the statutory MIPS exclusion based on the low-volume threshold.” I think the complaining for not being allowed to participate will be pretty minimal. 4% of such a small volume of Medicare won’t be that impactful for most.

There’s the start of our analysis of the MACRA final rule. A good first step to knowing if you qualify to participate in MACRA. Let us know if there are changes in the final rule that you’ve noted or that are bothering you. We’d love to hear them in the comments.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

MACRA Final Rule Is Out – MACRA Monday (on Friday)

Posted on October 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We usually wait until Monday to do our weekly MACRA Monday blog posts. However, today the MACRA final rule dropped and so we thought we’d do MACRA Monday on a Friday. Since the rule just came out this morning, we haven’t had a chance to do much analysis. No doubt we’ll do a lot more analysis, summarizing, etc in the future. For this post, I just wanted to share with you the various places you can go to find the final rule and summaries of the final rule that will be helpful.

The first resource you need is the MACRA final rule itself. Yes, it’s 2398 pages, but remember that CMS is required to respond to the feedback that was given in the proposed MACRA rule. The rule itself is much shorter, but the explanation of the rule is quite long. As Andy Slavitt noted, it’s long in the interest of transparency.

The reality is that most of you will only want to check out the MACRA Final Rule Executive Summary. It’s only 24 pages and should give most people what they need to know about the MACRA final rule. You can leave the 2398 page final rule to the health IT policy wonks.

Along with the executive summary, CMS has put out a new website with resources, education, and tools for the Quality Payment Program (Or as we call it, MACRA). The Education and Tools page has some great resources for those wanting to learn more about MACRA.

If you plan to participate in MIPS, then you’re likely going to use the Explore Measures page. Considering MACRA’s increase in the number of measures, this page will help you navigate through the various measures and decide which measures you’re going to do as part of MACRA.

If you want a higher level look at what CMS did to put together the MACRA final rule, take a second to read through Andy Slavitt’s letter to Clinicians. We might disagree with the details of MACRA, but after reading letters like this it’s hard to argue that Andy Slavitt and his team aren’t listening to providers and healthcare’s feedback on these rules.

That’s all for today. Happy reading this weekend! Over the next months and years we’ll be diving into the details of the program. If you’re reviewing the final rule like us, share any insights or findings you find interesting in the comments. It takes a large community to understand new rules like this.

CMS Finalizes the New Medicare Quality Payment Program

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) finalized its policy implementing the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) incentive payment provisions in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), collectively referred to as the Quality Payment Program. The new Quality Payment Program will gradually transform Medicare payments for more than 600,000 clinicians across the country, and is a major step in improving care across the entire health care system.

The final rule with comment period offers a fresh start for Medicare by centering payments around the care that is best for the patients, providing more options to clinicians for innovative care and payment approaches, and reducing administrative burden to give clinicians more time to spend with their patients, instead of on paperwork.

Accompanying today’s announcement is a new Quality Payment Program websitehttp://qpp.cms.gov, which will explain the new program and help clinicians easily identify the measures most meaningful to their practice or specialty.

To see the press release and obtain more information about today’s announcement, including a fact sheet, please visit: http://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2016/10/14/hhs-finalizes-streamlined-medicare-payment-system-rewards-clinicians-quality-patient-care.html

To learn more about the rule, visit: https://qualitypaymentprogram.cms.gov/education

AMA Touts Physician Interest In Digital Health Tools

Posted on October 13, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A few months ago, the group’s annual meeting, American Medical Association head Dr. James Madara ignited a firestorm of controversy when he suggested that many direct to consumer digital health products, apps and even EMRs were “the digital snake oil of the early 21st century.” Madara, who as far as I can tell never backed down completely from that statement, certainly raised a few hackles with his pronouncement.

Now, the AMA has come out with the results of physician survey whose results suggest that community doctors may be more excited about digital health’s potential than the AMA leader. The survey found that physicians are optimistic about digital health, though some issues must be addressed before they will be ready to adopt such technologies.

The study, which was backed by the AMA and conducted by research firm Kantar TNS, surveyed 1,300 physicians between July 7 and 18. Its content addressed a wide range of digital health technologies, including mobile apps, remote monitoring, wearables, mobile health and telemedicine.

Key findings of the study include the following:

  • While physicians across all age groups, practice settings and tenures were optimistic about the potential for digital health, their level of enthusiasm was greater than their current adoption rates.
  • The majority of physicians surveyed (85% of respondents) believe that digital health solutions can have a positive impact on patient care.
  • Physicians reported that they were optimistic a digital health can reduce burnout, while improving practice efficiency, patient safety and diagnostic capabilities.
  • Physicians said liability coverage, data privacy and integration of digital health tools with EMR workflows were critical to digital health adoption, as well as the availability of easy-to-use technologies which are proven to be effective and reimbursement for time spent conducting virtual visits.

All told, physicians seem willing to use digital health tools if they fit into their clinical practice. And now, it seems that the AMA wants to get out ahead of this wave, as long as the tools meet their demands. “The AMA is dedicated to shaping a future when digital health tools are evidence based, validated, interoperable, and actionable,” said AMA Immediate Past President Steven J. Stack, M.D

By the way, though it hasn’t publicized them highly, the AMA noted that it has already dipped its oar into several digital health-related ventures:

  • It serves as founding partner to Health2047, a San Francisco-based health care innovation company that combines strategy, design and venture disciplines.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Chicago-based incubator MATTER, to allow entrepreneurs and physicians to collaborate on the development of new technologies, services and products in a simulated health care environment.
  • It’s collaborating with IDEA Labs, a student-run biotechnology incubator, that helps to support the next generation of young entrepreneurs to tackle unmet needs in healthcare delivery and clinical medicine.
  • It’s playing an advisory role to the SMART project, whose key mission is the development of a flexible information infrastructure that allows for free, open development of plug-and-play apps to increase interoperability among health care technologies, including EHRs, in a more cost-effective way.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Omada Health and Intermountain Healthcare that has introduced evidence-based, technology-enabled care models addressing prediabetes.

Personally, I have little doubt that this survey is a direct response to the “snake oil” speech. But regardless of why the AMA is seeking a rapproachment with digital health players, it’s a good thing. I’m just happy to see the venerable physicians’ group come down on the side of progress.

 

What’s Been the Impact of ICD-10 and the End of the Grace Period – Join This Week’s #KareoChat

Posted on October 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

kareochat-icd-10

I’m excited to be hosting this week’s #KareoChat. I decided that it would be a great time to discuss the impact of ICD-10 on your organization and take a look at what impact the end of the ICD-10 grace period will have on your practice. This is an important topic that I don’t think has gotten enough discussion.

The chat is happening Thursday, October 13th at 9 AM PT. All you need to do to join is to search for the #KareoChat hashtag on Twitter and then add #KareoChat to any tweets you send during that time. I expect this will be a lively discussion, so please join in so you can learn and share.

Here are the 6 questions we’ll be discussing for the hour long #KareoChat:

  1. How has ICD-10 impacted your organization and healthcare for good?
  2. How has ICD-10 impacted your organization and healthcare for bad?
  3. The ICD-10 grace period ended on 9/30, what does this mean for your organization?
  4. Does the added specificity in ICD-10 post grace period help with care? Why or why not?
  5. What things still need to be improved in ICD-10 and how we’ve implemented it?
  6. Was the move to ICD-10 much ado about nothing?  Should we move to ICD-11 more quickly than we did 10?

There was a lot of hype around ICD-10 when it was implemented and certainly cost organizations a lot of money to be prepared for the change. However, things seem to have gone generally pretty smooth because of that preparation. I haven’t seen the same discussion happening with the end of the ICD-10 grace period. I’ll be interested to learn from people if this is a big deal or if practices will just take it in stride.

Join us to discuss the impact of ICD-10 on healthcare and the end of the ICD-10 grace period.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on this site.

Early Bird Registration for Digital Health Conference Ends Friday

Posted on October 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve worked with the Digital Health Conference since nearly the beginning.  It’s a really amazing conference that brings together the New York healthcare IT community and many thought leaders from around the globe.  Check out the full agenda for the conference to find more details on the great content they’ll provide.

I’m particularly interested to see what Robert Watcher, MD has to say at the conference this year.  He’s just coming off some work with NHS in England and I think he’ll have some interesting perspectives to offer us from that international perspective.

I’m mostly posting about this because the early bird registation for the digital health conference ends on Friday, October 14th.  Yes, that’s this Friday.  Don’t miss out on the discounted early bird rate.  Plus, as a Healthcare Scene reader, you can get an extra 15% discount off your registration by using the promo code HCS.

If you’re planning to be at the event, we usually put together a Tweetup one evening as well.  This is another highlight of the event since it brings together so many smart, social people that care about what’s happening in healthcare IT.  I look forward to seeing many of you there.

I’m Now a Thing on the Internet of Things

Posted on I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com.For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manager doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst, a role he recently repeated for a Council member.

Thanks to a Biotronik Eluna 8 DR-T pacemaker that sits below my clavicle, I’m now a thing on the internet of things. What my new gizmo does, other than keeping me ticking, is collect data and send it to a cell device sitting on my nightstand.

biotronik-eluna
Once a day, the cell uploads my data to Biotronik’s Home Monitoring website, where my cardiologist can see what’s going on. If something needs prompt attention, the system sends alerts. Now, this is a one way system. My cardiologist can’t program my pacemaker via the net. To do that requires being near Biotronik’s Renamic inductive system. That means I can’t be hacked like Yahoo email.

The pacemaker collects and sends two kinds of data. The first set shows the unit’s functioning and tells a cardiologist how the unit is programmed and predicts its battery life, etc. The second set measures heart functioning. For example, the system generates a continuous EKG. Here’s the heart related set:

  • Atrial Burden per day 

  • Atrial Paced Rhythm (ApVs) 

  • Atrial Tachy Episodes (36 out of 48 criteria) 

  • AV-Sequences 

  • Complete Paced Rhythm (ApVp)
  • Conducted Rhythm (AsVp) 

  • Counter on AT/AF detections per day 

  • Duration of Mode Switches
  • High Ventricular Rate Counters
  • Intrinsic Rhythm (AsVs) 

  • Mode Switching
  • Number of Mode Switches 

  • Ongoing Atrial Episode Time
  • Ventricular Arrhythmia

Considering the pacemaker’s small size, the amount of information it produces is remarkable. What’s good about this system is that its data are available 24/7 on the web.

The bad news is Biotronik systems don’t directly talk to EHRs. Rather, Renamic uses EHR DataSynch, a batch system that complies with IEEE 11073-10103, a standard for implantable devices. EHR DataSynch creates an XML file and ships it along with PDFs to an EHR via a USB key or Bluetooth. However, Renamic doesn’t support LANs. When the EHR receives the file, it places the data in their requisite locations. The company also offers customized interfaces through third party vendors.

For a clinician using the website or Renamic, data access isn’t an issue. However, access can be problematic in an EHR. In that case, the Biotronik data may or may not be kept in the same place or in the same format as other cardiology data. Also, batch files may not be transferred in a timely fashion.

Biotronik’s pacemaker, by all accounts, is an excellent unit and I certainly am glad to have it. However, within the EHR universe, it’s one more non-interoperable device. It takes good advantage of the internet for its patients and their specialists, but stops short of making its critical data readily available. In Biotronik’s defense, their XML system is agnostic, that is, it’s one that almost any EHR vendor can use. Also, the lack of a widely accepted electronic protocol for interfacing EHRs is hardly Biotronik’s fault. However, it is surprising that Biotronik does not market specific, real time interfaces for the products major EHRs.

AMA Introduces MACRA Tools – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 10, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

The American Medical Association has released a package of online tools designed to help physicians cope with major changes to Medicare rolling out next year under MACRA. While it’s likely that practices will still have plenty of challenges to address on their own, these tools seem like they may offer a leg up on the subject, particularly for smaller practices with less resources to throw at MACRA issues.

One of the tools being introduced is the AMA Payment Model Evaluator (Sadly an account is required, but there’s an option to create a new account), designed to help doctors determine how their practices will be impacted by MACRA. The Evaluator, which was developed in partnership with physicians and AMA partners, asks physicians and medical practice administrators to fill out an online questionnaire on their practice. The Evaluator then offers an assessment of their specific situation, along with educational material and other resources. This includes recommendations on which MACRA payment model is best for them, which can help your practice know the best direction for your specific needs.

The AMA has also added new MACRA-specific tools to its AMA Steps Forward collection of practice improvement strategies. The STEPS modules help physicians determine how to report on quality metrics central to MACRA as well as the Physician Quality Reporting System. The STEPS modules each focus on a specific issue and offer solutions, steps for implementation, case studies, CME opportunities and downloadable additional tools.

In addition, the physician group has launched a podcast series, Inside Medicare’s New Payment System, featuring acting CMS administrator Andy Slavitt, AMA staff experts and other healthcare leaders. The series, which will include five episodes, should help get physicians up to speed on MACRA-related changes. I for one am eager to hear what Slavitt has to say about MACRA, as he is about the best source on the subject you could have.

At first glance, it doesn’t seem that the AMA plans to spend a lot of time on the Advancing Care Information subset of MIPS, better known as the replacement for the Meaningful Use program. I guess that’s not a huge surprise, given that physicians are still grappling with broad implications of MACRA which go well beyond HIT issues. However, given how important Meaningful Use has been to physicians over the past few years, one might expect it to get a little bit of special attention. Maybe they’re waiting for the MACRA final rule to come out.

With CMS casting a wider net and looking for more from medical practices than just adequate levels of EMR adoption, the AMA is probably following CMS’ path in talking about more than just the meaningful use (Advancing Care Information) portion of MACRA.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

E-Patient Update: The Joy Of Health Data Synchronization

Posted on October 7, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, I realized that I’m a lucky girl. So lucky, in fact, that I get to have most of my health data accessible through one interface. No, I can’t access all of the data through a single interface — if that were true I’d be extraordinarily fortunate — but for day-to-day purposes I’m pretty close.

How does this happen, you ask? Well, actually it’s something fairly simple in principle, but powerful in action. I’ve fallen into a network.

I have been seen, now, by three physicians’ offices which are part of Privia Medical Group. Privia is a multi-specialty network of physicians who use the practice management and population tools provided by parent company Privia Health.

Because she’s part of the multi-specialty network, my primary care physician was able to refer me to two other specialists in the group with confidence and ease. But because she is part of a network of independent practices, rather than a group of employed physicians, I feel confident that she’s not unduly pressured to refer to these other providers. (I am definitely not a fan of staff model HMOs like Kaiser, which give you far too little choice of physicians and far too few means of recourse if you don’t like your provider.)

Just as importantly, at least to an e-patient geek like myself, I’ve learned that all Privia Medical Group specialists work with the same athenahealth portal. So when I log in to read the notes for one visit, I get to review the others as well, through a single sign-in.

Because members of Privia work with the same portal, I get the (sadly) unusual pleasure of looking at past and future appointments for multiple specialists as well as primary care on a single page.

Meanwhile, and this is of course critical, the provider I saw this morning had all the key details he needed about previous care, including an updated medication list, via a shared EMR. It always amazes me how hard it seems to be to give providers access to important details like this, but as readers know it’s still unusual independent offices share information fluidly.

While this is mostly good news story, it’s bit of a downer too, because it shouldn’t be such a treat to have your doctors share your information. Still, the fact remains that this is a high level of data sharing performance. The Privia set-up is a sure-as-shootin’ cure for my recent case of hyperportalotus, a nasty condition in which patients are beset with multiple incompatible portals by their providers.

Now, I still have to deal with two other portals (both instances of Epic MyChart) if I want to review my hospital care notes. But if I can be view all of my outpatient encounters with PCPs and specialists AND be reminded of routine care I might need (such as a flu shot), schedule and reschedule with my providers and pay any remaining bills I’m pretty darned happy.

Providers Often Choose Low-Tech Collection Solutions

Posted on October 6, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

As most providers know, it’s harder to collect money from the patient once they’ve walked out the door. This has always been an issue, but is particularly important today given that patients are being asked to bear an increasingly larger percentage of their healthcare bill.

In some cases, providers solve this problem by having their staff reach out directly via phone, rather than relying entirely on paper billing. Others address these issues with technology solutions such as offering payment options via a web portal. And of course, some providers do both.

But the question remains, which combination is most likely to boost collections efficiently without losing patients in the process? And it’s this question, which underlies all those other considerations, which a new study hopes to address. When reading the results, it’s good to bear in mind that the sponsor, BillingTree, is a payment technology firm and therefore has a bias, but the survey data was interesting nonetheless.

First, a look at providers’ collections challenges. Respondents told BillingTree that compliance and collecting payments once the patient has left the building were concerns, along with knowing the correct amount to bill after insurance and addressing the client’s ability to pay. Perhaps the biggest issues were a lack of payment channels – be they staffers, interactive voice response or website tech — and disputes over the amount billed.

According to BillingTree researchers, few respondents were using Web or automated phone payment collection technologies to bring in these missing dollars. While 93.9% accepted online and mail payments, and 86.7% said they accepted payments over the phone via a live agent, only 66.7% provided a web portal payment option, and just 6.7% offered the ability to pay via an interactive voice response system. Rather than add new technologies, respondents largely said that they intended to improve collections by adding staff members or outsourcing part of their collection operations.

On the other hand, technology plays a somewhat bigger part in providers’ future plans for collections. Over the next 12 months, 20% said they planned to begin accepting payments via a web portal, and 13.3% intend to add an IVR system to accept payments. Meanwhile, the 26.7% of providers who are planning to outsource some or all of their collections are likely to benefit indirectly from these technologies, which are common among payment outsourcers, BillingTree noted.

Among those providers that did offer phone or web-based payment options, one-fifth chose to add a convenience fee to the transaction. BillingTree researchers noted that given the low adoption of such technologies, and concerns about regulatory compliance, such fees might be unwise. Nonetheless, the data suggest that collection of such fees increase over time.

All this being said, the BillingTree study doesn’t look at perhaps the most critical technology issue providers are struggling to address. As a recent American Medical Association survey recently concluded, providers are quite interested in tools that link to their EMR and help them improve their billing and reimbursement processes.

Focusing on revenue cycle management issues at the front end of the process makes sense. After all, while patients are being forced to take on larger shares of their medical costs, insurers are still more reliable sources of income. So while it makes sense for providers to track down patients who leave without having paid their share of costs, focusing the bulk of their technology dollars on improving the claims process seems like a good idea.