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Helping Others – Martin Luther King Day

Posted on January 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today in the US, we’re celebrating the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. To celebrate the holiday, I thought it would be great to share some of Martin Luther King Jr.’s quotes. Many of the messages are relevant to the healthcare and illustrate what makes those working in healthcare so special.

Allscripts to Pay $100 Million Cash to Acquire Practice Fusion

Posted on January 8, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, Allscripts announced that it would pay $100 million cash to acquire EHR vendor, Practice Fusion. I wouldn’t quite say this is a fire sale, but in Silicon Valley it’s pretty close when you consider that according to CrunchBase Practice Fusion had raised over $157 million. These seem to be the kind of transactions that Allscripts likes to do. I’ve heard it said that Allscripts is the place where EHR software goes to die. That’s a corrupt way of describing what I think has been their strategy.

The press release said that Practice Fusion supports 30,000 ambulatory practices and 5 million patients. I wouldn’t be surprised if the practices number is inflated since it’s a free EHR and a lot of ambulatory practices signed up to check it out, but don’t actually use the software. I’m at least 2-3 of those practices and haven’t touched my accounts in years. The July 2017 meaningful use attestation data listed 8,440 providers using Practice Fusion software. So, Practice Fusion still has a good size user base, but it’s probably closer to 12-15k practices in my opinion.

As I’ve looked at the ambulatory EHR market, I’ve often been describing EHR vendors as distribution channels as opposed to EHR software vendors. If you go around any exhibit hall, EHR vendors aren’t really selling EHR software much anymore. In most cases, EHR vendors are catering to their existing user base and then using them as a distribution channel for other products and services. With this in mind, Allscripts acquisition of Practice Fusion expands their distribution channel. That’s a valuable thing.

One other piece of this transaction which I believe many won’t understand is Practice Fusion’s relationships with life science organizations. Those relationships are how Practice Fusion was funding their free EHR. I’ve heard mixed reviews on those relationships, but no doubt Allscripts is hoping those relationships can generate more revenue for their company when they add Allscript’s large userbase.

Fierce Healthcare also found in the SEC filing for this acquisition an interesting note about Practice Fusion receiving a request from the US Attorney’s office:

The SEC filing also noted that Practice Fusion received a request from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Vermont in March 2017 requesting information and documents as part of a civil investigation into the company’s EHR certification. Allscripts stated that although Practice Fusion has complied in “a cooperative, thorough and timely manner,” any legal proceedings, damages or settlements could “adversely impact” future operating results.

No doubt these requests are an extension of the $155 million eCW Whistleblower lawsuit. I expect most major EHR vendors have had some sort of inquiry after the eCW lawsuit. Hopefully, the team at Allscripts vetted the inquiries well especially given Practice Fusion’s past history of pushing the envelope. Considering Practice Fusion’s FTC Charges and Settlement, I’d think that they’d have been careful about their EHR certification, but it’s hard to take the Silicon Valley mentality out of your culture.

The other obvious tie into this story is Allscript’s previous acquisition of McKesson’s HIT software business. I’ll admit that it’s hard for me to keep up with all the EHR software that exists under Allscripts umbrella, but with the addition of Practice Fusion, Allscripts certainly has an EHR software for healthcare organizations of every shape and size. Plus, I expect they run their EHR businesses at break even while they make most of their money off of other lines of business they can sell to their EHR customers. It’s not just Allscripts that’s seen how much money can be made doing revenue cycle management and providing other services to their EHR users.

I will be interested to see what Allscripts chooses to do with Practice Fusion long term. Will they eventually sunset the Practice Fusion EHR and encourage users to migrate to one of their other EHR? Will they start charging Practice Fusion EHR users for the EHR? You can imagine the outrage that would come if they did start charging, but EHR switching isn’t a simple process. So, I’d imagine that many practices would just start paying and it would take months and years for them to finally switch EHR vendors and many would probably just decide to stay with “the devil they know.” That would be a big gamble on the part of Allscripts, so it will be interesting to see if they make it. Then again, maybe they have enough revenue from being a distribution channel to Practice Fusion users that they’ll be able to continue the free EHR model. Time will tell.

Those are some initial thoughts on the acquisition of Practice Fusion by Allscripts. I should also note that the acquisition isn’t complete. It still has to go through the standard ant-trust evaluation process, but I don’t expect that to be an issue. What do you think of this acquisition? Is this a good move by Allscripts? What does this mean for Practice Fusion users?

Top 10 Blog Posts on EMR and EHR from 2017

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we kick off 2018, I thought it would be fun to look back at the top 10 blog posts (based on views) in 2017 for EMR and EHR. It’s always great to see what people found interesting and which topics were of interest to readers. Plus, I’m always fascinated to see what old articles are still of interest to people. Not to mention, to look at what has changed since the article was written.

Facebook in Healthcare – What’s amazing about this blog post is that it’s from 2014. Looking back 3+ years later, I haven’t really seen Facebook become a big player in healthcare. Sure, there are plenty of patient groups on Facebook, but it’s not really a Facebook product. Facebook has done a number of things in healthcare over the years to get the word out about organ donation and things like that, but I currently don’t see them as a big player in healthcare the same way Amazon, Google, and Apple are looking at healthcare.

What the EMR Industry Can Learn From Facebook – Amazing that another article about Facebook was in the Top 10 and this one from 2012 was written by Priya Ramchandran. Her vision of a world where a patients health record was just automatically pushed down to a server every time we have a health encounter has been far from realized. The challenge of the comparison for me is that Facebook has a reason to push all that data together. In healthcare, there are reasons why organizations don’t want to push the data out to the patient. Until we change those reasons, we won’t see this vision despite hundreds of companies efforts to try and accomplish it. Yes, even Apple is working on solving this problem now and I think they’ll fail.

Epic Launches FHIR-Based App Platform – Epic’s launch of the Epic App Orchard platform was big news in 2017. I’ll admit that I’m still a bit skeptical about Epic App Orchard. Many herald it as Epic opening up their EHR to developers. I personally am skeptical and fear that it’s really just making public the connections they were already creating and is more PR than anything. Epic App Orchard isn’t a truly open API that would allow innovators and entrepreneurs to build on top of the Epic EHR. Plus, I fear that Epic App Orchard is just a new revenue stream for Epic. Those are my fears that I’ll be exploring as I talk to people in 2018 about it.

Publicly Traded Health IT Companies – I wouldn’t have thought of this blog post as one that would have garnered a lot of attention. Maybe that means we should do more work covering the publicly traded healthcare IT companies on this blog. They seem to be increasingly dominating the landscape.

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: Medical Ethics and the Machine Revolution – One of the great additions to EMR and EHR this year was Janae Sharp and this blog post was an excellent example of her work. Understanding the impact of AI in healthcare is going to be an extremely important topic over the next decade. I’m glad she kicked off the conversation since it’s a challenging one. I still keep thinking about the question she asked, “Can a machine learn empathy?” Chew on that one for a while.

EHR Innovation & Regulation: Friends or Foes? – I’m really glad that this post by Stephen Dart from AdvancedMD did so well. I think most doctors don’t appreciate the challenging situation EHR vendors are in when it comes to balancing compliance and innovation. I believe it’s the core of what’s wrong with most EHR software out there and contributes to a lot of physician burnout.

Is Cerner Edging Up On Epic? – This post was from 2016, but the question is still a good one. The reality is that both Cerner and Epic are doing amazingly well. I don’t see anything on the horizon that’s going to change it. Both of them are behemoths that are doing incredibly well. I don’t really see either of them cutting into the progress of the other either. What do you think?

Is Your Health Data Unstructured? – Enabling an AI Powered Healthcare Future – I still love the insight shared in this article. Technology doesn’t solve your problems. Technology amplifies your current state. If you’re doing a good job, technology will accelerate the good. If you’re doing poorly on something, technology will accelerate and amplify the bad.

#HIMSS17 Mix Tape – This is just a fun post leading into HIMSS that Colin has done every year with us for a lot of years. The exciting part is that when Colin posted this he was still working at a Healthcare IT vendor. We’re lucky to now have him formally as part of the Healthcare Scene team. I’m quite sure Colin will be doing a #HIMSS18 Mix Tape shortly. So, if you have suggestions, reach out to him on Twitter.

12 Reasons Why EMRs Improve Patient Care – How amazing that this post from 2011 is still doing so well. I imagine it’s because so many people are trying to understand the value of the EHR. Especially as it related to improving patient care. This post really deserves a future dedicated blog post to look at the 12 ways EMR improve patient care and how many of them have been realized. I’ll put it on my to-do list for 2018.

There you have it. The top 10 blog posts on EMR and EHR for 2017. It’s always fun to look back and see what’s changed and what’s stayed the same. Thanks to each of you for reading and supporting the work we do here. Now on to an awesome 2018!

Happy New Year!

Posted on January 1, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Happy New Year to all of you! Looking back, 2017 was an incredible year at Healthcare Scene. We have so much to be grateful for as we kickoff 2018. Most of all, we’re thankful to each of you for reading and supporting the work we do and to our advertisers who believe in our mission and vision.

As we begin 2018, we hope each of you will find joy and happiness and that we can all do what we can in our sphere of influence to improve healthcare.

Happy New Year!

Moving to Health Care from Sick Care

Posted on December 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the biggest themes I’ve heard in 2017 was the need for health care to shift from our current sick care system to really focused on the whole person. This has largely been driven by the move to value based reimbursement, but health data has also illustrated this problem.

The good news is that technology can help with this challenge as well. Technology can sift through all the data and provide insights that can help a healthcare provider personalize the wellness care a patient really needs. That’s a powerful idea that I think we’ll see starting to bloom in 2018.

I found this powerful image that describes at least part of our health problems in the US:

There’s certainly a link between happiness and health, but beyond that I think you could replace happier with healthier. It’s fascinating to consider how much healthier we’d all be if we could just slow down and simplify our lives. As someone who does far too much, this idea resonates with me. However, it also is very apparent how hard it is to change this culture.

Where do you see the move from sick care to health care happening? Are there initiatives, organizations, companies, etc that are doing a good job in this regard? What are you doing in your personal life to slow down and improve your health? We look forward to hearing your thoughts in the comments.

Should We Continue Wearing Fitness Trackers?

Posted on December 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Wired recently published an article that says “Science Says Fitness Trackers Don’t Work. Wear One Anyway.” No doubt they chose the headline to cue off of the word science in our political world. However, their article lacked substance as to why people should wear a fitness tracker even though we’ve already said with our actions that we’re not interested.

In fact Wired leads off with this in their article:

Our devices, apps, and platforms, experts increasingly warn, have been engineered to capture our attention and ingrain habits that are (it seems self evident) less than healthy.

Unless, that is, you’re talking about fitness trackers. For years, the problem with Fitbits, Garmins, Apple Watches, and their ilk has been that they aren’t addictive enough. About one third of people who buy fitness trackers stop using them within six months, and more than half eventually abandon them altogether.

The follow this up with 2 studies that show that fitness trackers are ineffective but go on to argue that fitness trackers are getting better and so we should keep wearing them.

Needless to say, I’m not convinced and I don’t believe the majority of the population will be convinced either. I’ve long argued that what we really need mobile health sensors to accomplish is for them to become clinically relevant. Once these sensors are clinically relevant, then we’ll all wear them much more. Until then, these fitness trackers and other health sensors will just be novelty items which we discard after a short period (except for the crazy few quantified selfers out there).

It’s really a simple math. As soon as the value of wearing a health sensor outweighs the cost of wearing one, we’ll all do it. I believe that the key to showing that value is to make the data the health sensor collects clinically relevant.

Lately, I’ve seen some patient advocates suggesting that EHR patient portals should really embrace patients uploading their sensor data to the portal. While I think the posture of empowering patients outside of the office is important, there’s very little value for doctors or patients to have them upload their current sensor data. What will change this? That’s right…once the data becomes clinically relevant, then every doctor will want that data to be uploaded. This demand will drive every EHR vendor to implement it. Problem solved. Until then, don’t hold your breath.

What do you think of fitness trackers? Should we keep wearing them? When will health sensors finally become clinically relevant?

The Future of Small Medical Practices

Posted on December 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the questions I get most often relates to the future of small practices in healthcare. I’ve heard a lot of people make really great arguments for why small medical practices have an extremely challenging future in healthcare. We’ve all heard stories of large healthcare organizations eating up small medical practices left and right.

For the longest time, I’ve argued that this is all just part of a cycle of doctors selling to hospitals and then doctors hating life as an employed doctor and so they return to running their own practice. This cycle seems to be playing out and most doctors still hate being employees. However, there are a lot of other forces at play that makes it harder for doctors to go out and start their own independent medical practice again.

As I look at the biggest healthcare trends, none of them point to a brighter future for the small, independent medical practice. In fact, most of them make it even harder for small medical practices to survive.

For example, the shift to value based reimbursement is something that should be a great thing for small medical practices that have been known to provide the highest quality, personalized care. While this is true, must of value based reimbursement is as much about understanding and applying the data to a population in order to improve the overall health. How many small practices are going to be capable to do this type of data analysis?

If you extrapolate this further, it’s hard to imagine a future healthcare system that’s not built on the back of data. If that’s the case, he who holds the data holds the power. It’s worth asking if even the hospitals and health systems will be large enough to have the data they need on their patients. Or will even the largest hospitals and health systems need to work with massive companies like Google and Amazon who are currently collecting data at rates that no hospital could even consider?

This is a scary and exciting future that is a topic for another post. However, from a small practice perspective, this could be a good thing. If large corporations like Google and Amazon have the data needed to improve healthcare, then it’s possible that those corporations will enable small practices to survive. It could level the playing field for small practices that are trying to compete with large health systems.

What’s certain is that every healthcare organization is going to have to move beyond just the EHR. Sure, the EHR will be a requirement for every medical practice, but I believe it will only be the start. For small and large medical practices to survive, they’re going to have to start exploring what other technology they can implement to provide a better patient experience. The good thing is that small practices can be nimble and implement new technology quickly and without as much bureaucracy. The hard part is that they have to do so with a smaller budget.

What do you think about the future of small medical practices? Will they survive? Should we be making efforts to make sure they survive?

Healthcare Holiday Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on December 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Happy Holidays to all of you! Being Friday and the holidays we just wanted to have some fun. So, here are three holiday cartoons for your weekend enjoyment.


Will we ever get to this point in healthcare? Telemedicine is coming on strong. Granted Santa isn’t there yet either, but the concept is pretty interesting.


Nice to see the personalized care, but I think that this isn’t the best way to engage the patient and encourage behavior change.


This kind of feels like what we do in healthcare too. However, at some point you can’t just move the needle to cut costs.

Happy Holidays!

An EHR Designed for Doctors at the Anti-Aging World Congress

Posted on December 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently attended the Med Tech Impact Expo and Conference in Las Vegas. The event was colocated with the A4M (American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine) World Congress. I was a judge at the Quadruple Impact startup competition that was organized by Medstro where I enjoyed hearing a number of promising startup companies pitch their ideas. They were all pretty early stage, but I couldn’t help but appreciate their passion and creativity.

While not my normal area of expertise, I had to take a trip around the Anti-Aging medicine exhibit hall. There were a large number of pharmaceuticals, neutraceuticals, body toners, etc etc. However, I was of course attracted to the booths that talked about technology.

The first category of company I saw was the practice marketing companies. Most of them were offering the full service soup to nuts offering to these medical practices. It makes a lot of sense for them to target this market since many of the doctors attending the anti-aging conference offer a lot of products and services direct to consumer. So, all of the direct to consumer marketing, SEO, social media, etc can be really effective for these practices. Of course, at this show they mostly send their salespeople, so they didn’t really want to talk with me much since I wasn’t representing a medical practice.

The second category of technology companies I found was the EHR vendors. I think I found 3 of them placed throughout the floor and I stopped and talked with 2 of the companies. Both of them focused solely on this market and so their approach was quite different. They designed the EHR to cater to the doctor and the practice instead of EHR certification and meaningful use regulations.

One of them talked about how they approached the sale of supplies much differently than a traditional EHR might do. In fact, it was an integral part of their system. This made a lot of sense since many of these medical practices have a huge retail sales component.

I did find that each of these EHR was still straddling the billing line. Many of them had practices that still needed to bill insurance companies rather than billing the patient directly for everything. At least one of them admitted that their insurance billing engine wasn’t that great and you could tell that they were a little bit torn on whether they should go all in on the insurance billing side of things or not.

In fact, one of them I talked to was pondering whether to go after EHR certification. I advised them to not do it since it will likely alienate their existing users. Although, I’m sure they’ll look at their addressable market and the potential medical market and be really tempted to not listen to my advice. It’s a powerful thing to say that you have an EHR that’s focused on the doctor and the practice as opposed to regulations. Why would they want to give that up?

I asked to get a full demo of their EHR after the conference. There wasn’t enough time at the event. Once I do, I’ll give you a full report on these hidden EHR. I’ll be interested to see what an EHR that was designed for the doctor and the practice looks like. I’ll let you know what I find.

AI and Machine Learning Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on December 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Two of the biggest buzzwords right now in healthcare are AI and machine learning. The problem is that both of these things are real and are going to impact healthcare in really significant ways, but everyone is using them to apply to everything. Once the industry starts doing that, words lose their meaning.

That said, I still couldn’t help but laugh at this AI and machine learning cartoon (Credit to Andrew Richards for sharing this cartoon with me):

The sad reality is that this is what many companies are doing. They look for the answers they want instead of looking at what answers the data provides. That’s a hard concept for many to grasp and takes a real expert to do the latter effectively.