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EMR, EHR, and Health IT Jobs

Posted on January 31, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In our current economic client, it’s been quite interesting for me to keep an eye on the EMR, EHR and Health IT job market. While many in the country are out of work, those with healthcare and IT experience are usually in very high demand across the country.

I recently heard this quote from Michael Dell (founder of Dell):

“If we set up a new site to hire 100 software or storage or networking engineers, we have to go find them one at a time and seek them out and convince them and cajole them to come work for us. If we set up a warehouse or distribution center and we have 100 jobs there, we will have a line of 10,000 people waiting outside to try to get those jobs.”

I think we’re seeing something similar in healthcare IT. As long time readers will probably know, we have our own EMR, EHR and Health IT job board. Here are two of the jobs that were recently posted on the job board:

Senior Healthcare IT Project Manager
Senior IT Systems Analyst

Watching that job board and also seeing the jobs that are submitted on the Healthcare Scene LinkedIn group is interesting. You definitely see the trend that Michael Dell mentions. There are a lot of skilled jobs available, and not enough skilled people to fill those jobs.

I’ll be interested to see how this evolves in a post-HITECH era. Right now if you have EHR experience and expertise, there are a wide variety of jobs available to you. I’m sure there are pockets and communities where this isn’t the case, but across the country there are people looking for people who know and understand EHR. Many of the top EHR consulting firms can’t get enough people on board to support their projects. Plus, we’re only at about 50% adoption (depending on whose numbers you prefer).

I expect the above trend to continue at least through the end of meaningful use and likely well beyond that. As I often tell people, healthcare is going to be around forever and using technology to improve healthcare isn’t going anywhere either.

BYOD, Skype, and Apps for Medical Emergencies: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on December 9, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

BYOD and HIPAA Compliance: Can You Have Both

With the increased use of smart phone and tablets by doctors, BYOD (bring your own device) is on the rise. With it comes the risk of almost inevitable risk of HIPAA violations. There needs to be some serious talk of protocols for BYOD, as the trend is here to stay. Can BYOD and HIPAA Compliance coexist? Weigh-in here.

Skype HIPAA Risks Not Given Enough Attention

Skype use among medical professionals isn’t high, but enough do that proper attention should be paid toward making sure these phone calls are HIPAA-compliant. There are quite a few risks associated with Skype-calling, and this post discusses why providers should be concerned, and poses some ideas on how to lessen these risks.

Key Radiology Takeaways from RSNA

CIO Janakan Rajgendran from GNAX Health guest posted at EMR and HIPAA this week. He discussed some of the highlights from RSNA 2012. The theme of the conference was ‘Patients First,’ which was reflected in a lot of the addresses from the conference. This post focuses on several different highlights, such as dosage tracking, image parts of HIE, and RSNA conversation changes.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Expanding HIEs Taking Role As Backbone For Reform Efforts 

HIEs have grown significantly in the past year and continue to do so. Because of this, it appears that they are becoming the “backbone” for reform efforts. HIEs are also playing a big role in health reform-related efforts such as with ACO and Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

Smart Phone Healthcare

Five Essential Apps for Medical Emergencies

There are lots of apps that have been created to help people be prepared in case of an emergency. Here are five that seem to stand out, from first aid tips to emergency information cards. Check out this list and see if you can benefit from any of them.

Disaster Planning, Horrors of Generic HIT Training, and Snap.MD: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on November 25, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

Disaster Planning and HIPAA

Unfortunately, it appears that far too many healthcare providers don’t follow this rule. There aren’t very many that even have an emergency plan in place. However, this will soon need to be remedied. HIPAA security general rules state that not only must a patient’s privacy be protected, but the ePHI is available at all times — even in the case of an emergency. All healthcare providers, regardless of size, will need to implement some kind of disaster planning, regardless of their situation, in order to be in compliance with these regulations.

EMR Add-On’s that Provide Physician Benefit

MedCPU is a part of the inaugural NYC Digitial Health Accelerator class. They have developed a new concept that will likely to very helpful to many. It analyzes free text notes and structured data, and checks for compliance with rules and to identify any deviances. The company described one hospital using the services the company provides as a benefit given to doctors who use EHR. This is just one of many add-ons available, but some are seeing them to be a large reason why some doctors want to adopt EMRs.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Video: The Horrors of Generic HIT Training

Need a break from the day-to-day monotony? Be sure to check at this video on the horrors of generic HIT Training. It “offers a wry take on what happens when EMR training isn’t relevant for the doctor who’s getting the training. In this case, we witness the plight of a heart surgeon who’s forced through a discussion on primary care functions that she neither wants nor needs.”

Study: EMR ROI Stronger In Low-Income Setting

A recent study revealed something interesting. Hospitals in low-income areas actually may have a decent return on investment when an EMR is integrated. Three different areas were looked at and analyzed, and it was found that after five years of having an EMR, the hospital examined had a net benefit of over $600,000. Not all hospitals will benefit this much, but it’s encouraging to see more EMR success stories popping up.

Smart Phone Healthcare

Get Peace of Mind and Avoid the ER With Snap.MD

It’s the middle of the night, and your child breaks out in a rash all of his or her body. The doctor’s office doesn’t have middle of the night, on-call doctors, so the only option is the ER, right? Maybe not for long. Snap.MD, a new telemedicine system, may help parents decide if the Emergency Room is the best course of action. Parents of pediatric patients are connected to physician, who will help evaluate the situation via video conferencing.

Clinical Data Access, New Open Source EHR, and Striiv – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on October 28, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Call Me Maybe at #CHIME12

One of the most popular songs among teens recently is “Call Me Maybe.” Well, at CHIME 2012, a music video of this song was created, featuring many of the participants in #CHIME12. It’s a fun little video, and the song sure is catchy.

Senators Join Initiative to Scrutinize Meaningful Use

After four GOP leaders have demanded that HHS Katherine Sebilus account for “failures” they found with Meaningful Use. Recently, a few senators have joined in the fight as well. Several questions were raised about EMRs, Medicare, and Meaningful Use. Is this the push that was needed in order to get Congress interested in the future of EMRs?

EMR and HIPAA
SXSW Accelerator Event for Health Startups

SXSW has long been known as an amazing music, film and now IT event. In fact, many people laud the event as a great place where creative people from all industries come together. This year SXSW has a whole health IT campus and a section of their Startup Accelerator competition that’s just devoted to healthcare IT startups. It will be a great place for healthcare IT to mix with the rest of the IT startup world. Plus, I expect a number of very interesting health IT companies to launch in the SXSW accelerator.

Access to Clinical Data Too Easy Via Phone

Most doctor’s offices will verify information by asking for a name and birthdate. However, this system could easily be compromised. Is there a better way to verify this type of information, before discussing medical issues? This post talks about different ideas, and how patient portals might be the solution.

New Open Source (Free) EHR Offering Developed by A Doctor

A new open source EHR is about to be released. And it was developed by a physician. Michael Chen, MD,  the doctor behind it, was interviewed on EMR and HIPAA. He discusses why he wanted to create an open source EHR, future plans, and any challenges that might be associated with it in this post.

Happy EMR Doctor

EMR Use Improves Primary Care: New Study

While there has been some debate about if EMR improves patient care, a recent study indicates that it does; at least in some health specialties. Over 7000 patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes were studied over the course of nine months, and the results ruled in the favor of EMRs. Dr. Michael West has found in his own personal observations, EMR does indeed improve patient care as well.

Smart Phone and Health Care

Five Challenges of mHealth

While mHealth has many advantages and has improved health care in many ways, there have been some challenges that have come about. These challenges include privacy, data security, and funding.

Striiv Ups the Standard for Pedometers — Games, Challenges, and Charity Incorporated

A new generation for the classic pedometer has been created. Striiv recently released a $99 pedometer that really gives the old kind a makeover. It incorporates fitness games, goals, and a charity to convince people to get walking. For those that don’t want to spend $99 on a pedometer, the (free) mobile app is available for the iPhone, and has a lot of the same functions.

Wireless Health, HIPAA, and Patient Engagement – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on September 30, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

Wireless Health Data Collection Innovations Getting Hot

Some of the newest health data innovations are wireless. From a chip that can test blood sugar levels to an ECG that connects to a cell phone through blue tooth. The possibilities are endless when it comes to wireless devices.

HIPAA Infographic

HIPAA violations happen frequently. Some are criminal, others civil. This infographic explains some of the most common reason for HIPAA violations, and the penalties associated with them. Last year, over 12,000 companies have either been investigated or had issues resolved concerning HIPAA violations. Definitely an interesting infographic to look over.

Hospital EMR and EHR

FCC Says Wireless Health Should Be “Routine” Within Five Years

An announcement from the FCC pushes for mHealth to be a standard practice in the medical world by 2017. Some doctors are hesitant to implement mobile devices, so this may be difficult for some to grasp. The FCC is working to make this easier, by doing things like working with the FDA to help with creating and introducing devices into the market.

Happy EMR Doctor

Patient Engagement: Who are the Real Targets?

While creators of health technology claim they are trying to reach patients most, what does that mean? Many people who would benefit from these types of technology are lower class, however, upper class people are probably more likely to embrace it. Should companies invest more time in discovering who target markets are?

Smart Phone Health Care

Traqs: One Tool to Rule Them All

Having trouble keeping track of all the health apps and devices that are being created? Traqs, a new device, does it for you. This innovation can track multiple devices and create graphs about activity on them. It makes it much easier to take control of your health and exercise devices.

EMR, HIPAA & EHR Jobs

Posted on April 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I happened to meet with someone who was working a Las Vegas job fair. It was convenient for me to stop by while he was there, so I did so we could talk business. I’ll be honest that it bothered me a little bit personally to see the hundreds of people standing in line waiting to enter the job fair. Sure I’d seen and heard the reports of the 5000 people who showed up for 750 jobs. Although, it’s quite a different thing to see it first hand. Thankfully, I had my business discussion and left before I had to hear the hard stories that I’m sure many of them could share. Then again, I’m sure I would have also seen some amazing optimism and excitement from those looking to land a job to change their life.

On my drive home, I couldn’t help but think about the healthcare IT job situation. We’ve often written about the shortage of qualified healthcare IT & EHR talent to be able to service the onslaught of EHR software that we are seeing right now. Even for EHR vendors it’s a bit of a dog fight to get the very best people to work for them. Yet, I’ve also heard on EMR Thoughts from far too many healthcare IT certificate program students that can’t find a job. I’m not going to lie to say it makes my heart break. I do what I can and refer them to people I know who help with this stuff for a living, but it’s hard.

I think Jennifer Dennard must feel very similar to me since she’s written on the healthcare IT Worforce development and social media resources for healthcare IT job seekers to just name a few of her posts on the subject. It’s just a hard contrast for me to see hospitals and other healthcare related companies that can’t find qualified people and so many people still without jobs.

I’m not sure how many people know that I have an EMR and EHR job board. It’s not a real big thing, but it has a ton of different EMR, EHR, HIPAA, and Healthcare IT related jobs posted there. Here are a few that were posted specifically for the EMR and EHR community:
EMR Software Programmer
Director, HIPAA Compliance
Ambulatory EMR Server Administrator

The jobs listed above appear in the sidebar of many of the Healthcare Scene websites. Hopefully this is one small way to help both EHR and Healthcare companies find qualified talent and help those searching for a job in healthcare IT learn more about the needs and open jobs.

Bridging the Gap Between HIT Education and Workforce Development

Posted on February 29, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I came across a recent article about an initiative between the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the US Dept. of Labor to “train students at community and technical colleges for health IT jobs at hospitals and clinics in rural areas.”

The struggle for rural healthcare facilities to find qualified candidates – in healthcare IT or otherwise – has been well-documented, as has the struggle that healthcare IT students face when it comes time to find a job. Prospective vendor employers typically require that job candidates have experience working with their systems, yet few make those systems available to academic institutions via internships or technology donations.

The rural health IT training program highlights specific objectives that I think would apply to health IT workforce development in any area:

  • Reach out to potential workers and employers to inform them about career pathways in health information management and technology
  • Support employers in educating potential health IT workers, which would include current staff that need training and newly recruited staff
  • Support employers in staffing health IT positions

This disconnect between academia, graduates and employers is one that I think all healthcare IT education programs are facing, no matter what area their students will eventually end up working in. Another of which I was recently made aware is the lack of communication between academic institutions and the employer community. There are several schools in my home state of Georgia that currently have HIT programs in place, but the surrounding business community is not aware some of them exist, and therefore completely overlook graduating classes full of job candidates.

The Technology Association of Georgia’s (TAG’s) Health Society is working with several area schools including Georgia Tech, Georgia Perimeter and Southern Polytechnic to help bridge this gap, and hopes to bring graduates and employers together at its HIT Job Fair on March 23rd.

In talking about the upcoming event with Deleise Lindsay, Founder and Principal of Well-Change Group and a member of TAG Health’s Board of Directors, she explained that not only do we need to make HIT job candidates and employers aware of each other, and ensure that graduates have proper training on software systems, but we must also equip them with the necessary professional skills that will make their transition into HIT that much quicker.

She highlighted three main challenges that academia and business currently face:

  • Building awareness of HIT job opportunities
  • Determining who is a viable candidate for these types of jobs – typically folks with clinical or IT backgrounds
  • Educating graduates on how to market themselves by equipping them with resume-building and networking skills

I’d love to hear from readers – job candidates, recent hires or employers – as to what you believe the secret to job hiring success is, and how you would recommend academia and employers work together to clear up this mystery.

Collaboration is Key When it Comes to HIT Workforce Development

Posted on January 18, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

One thing that I love about this industry is its willingness to collaborate, and I’m not just talking about collaborative care. I’m talking about healthcare IT’s propensity to brainstorm new ideas as the drop of a hat. Put two HIT folks – be they physician, vendor or blogger – in a room, and 20 minutes later you’re going to have a new idea related to care delivery, product development or possible partnership on your hands. It gets even more prolific when editorially minded marketing folks like me are added to the mix.

I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how even blogs can foster this sort of collaboration. Last month in “Finding an EMR Job Champion,” I chatted with Rich Wicker, HIMS Director at Shore Memorial Hospital in New Jersey, about how this industry can best align recent graduates of HIT certification programs with training and jobs. Some of you may have noticed several comments left on that post by Sean McPhillips, a man of many hats. He is currently an adjunct instructor at Cincinnati State – a community college in the HITECH College Consortia; project manager at the Kentucky Regional Extension Center; and creator of the HITECHWorkforce.com, a free resource to help students enter the HIT work environment.

In his comments, he advocates for a mentor-protégé program: “Students still need some more help finding jobs. What I think needs to happen is a “Mentor/Protégé” model. That is, pairing students with industry professionals who can mentor them into the industry. I’ve passively done that…to success. I think that will work.” He later followed up with the news that he hopes to work with HIMSS, which is developing a similar program, to get this model off the ground.

I recently had the opportunity to speak with McPhillips a bit more about his idea. I was eager to find out just how he plans to jumpstart it:

It seems as if you’ve been kicking this idea around for a while. How did it come about?
Being with the extension center, I’ve mentored a handful of people along the way, and I think there needs to be a more structured process so that students coming out of these [HITECH College Consortia] programs who want to be mentored have a place to go, they know how to get and stay engaged in the process. I think that there is with HIMSS, but I don’t think it’s really been tightly coupled with the workforce development program.

When I spoke with Helen Figge, Senior Director of Career Services at HIMSS, she was really excited to talk with me, and pointed me to HIMSS’ career development page to look around and see what they have out there. I’m thinking of how we can connect [what they’re already doing] into the workforce development program within the overall HITECH project structure, so that we can connect students who come out of these programs with their local HIMSS chapter, which could then pair them up with a mentor that’s in their region. That’s what’s really missing. That’s what’s really necessary to get people plugged into this profession – especially if they’re coming from outside of this profession.

HIMSS does not already have some sort of relationship with the college consortia?
They kind of do, but I don’t think it’s really tightly coupled. I think HIMSS recognizes this, so they’ve been developing their career development program. They’re near completion of a new, entry-level certification called the CSHIMS certification. That is something where you don’t need to have a whole lot of experience in health information technology, but you need to demonstrate some degree of knowledge in subject matter to obtain that certification. That might be a good way to help these students take the next step into the profession, when they’re looking to get a job. That could be part of the whole mentorship program concept.

Isn’t there a double-edged sword to it financially? Wouldn’t students have to become paying members of HIMSS, and then would they have to pay for certification? If they’re looking for jobs, finances might be tighter than usual.
That’s a great point. The question is, what are the costs associated with certification and becoming a member. There is a student membership discount. There’s a cost to certification, obviously, so these are things that are to be considered. That has not escaped me, so that’s going to be part of my brainstorming session. I’m going to meet up with them in Vegas when I go out to HIMSS.

One of the things I want to be able to do is make this attractive for people, particularly students, and if they have to lay out $500 or $1,000, and they’re already unemployed or they’re financially strapped, it becomes not just a double-edged sword, it becomes a disincentive.

I wonder if the vendors couldn’t get involved and offer scholarships.
It’s funny that you mention scholarships because that might be something the local HIMSS chapters can do. I know the Ohio HIMSS chapter used to do a $1,000 scholarship every year for students. So this might be something that the boards or the individual chapters could subsidize.

If you’re in the HITECH workforce development program, maybe HIMSS would be willing to waive membership for one year. That might be something they may be interested in doing.

This is part of the whole brainstorming session that I’m going to try to have over the next month or so. I’ll vet this through HIMSS over the next couple of weeks and hopefully we’ll come up with a good strategy by the end of February. And then we’ll start piloting it in the March timeframe.

I hope to run into McPhillips in Vegas to see how his chat with the HIMSS career development folks is coming along. It’s nice to know that one industry insider’s idea, and subsequent blog comments, might actually create job opportunity in the industry.

EMR Job Seekers Get Their Big Break

Posted on January 11, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I’m not a big fan of reality shows, especially those that involve contestants singing, telling jokes, dancing, or anything else that could potentially result in public humiliation. I’m in the minority, of course, as this style of television programming shows no sign of abating anytime soon. It’s a worldwide epidemic, in my opinion.

I am a fan of creative marketing – applying concepts traditionally associated with one particular medium (like television) to something entirely different (like healthcare). Needless to say, the Big Break job recruitment program – you could also call them auditions – intrigued me.

In a nutshell, pre-screened candidates take part in a one-day audition process put on by recruitment firm Intellect Resources and participating hospitals. Candidates then compete to become trainers and instruct staff on the use of the sponsoring hospital’s electronic medical record system or related healthcare IT system.

Seems like a slam-dunk concept, in my opinion. Those who are unemployed get a job within their community, and also get a taste of what that popular 15 minutes of fame is like. Did I mention that candidates go through video interviews and public presentations during the daylong process?

I recently chatted with Tiffany Crenshaw, President and CEO of sponsoring organization Intellect Resources, about how the program came about and the impact it has had on its participants’ lives (and go-lives).

How did the Big Break come about?
Tiffany Crenshaw: The Big Break spawned out of a project we were working on at Mt. Sinai Hospital last year. Last fall, they were getting ready for their Epic training and called me in a panic. They were expecting to get 90 to 100 trainers, and were going to use nurses, but realized at the last minute that wasn’t a viable idea. So they called us and said, “We have to do something now – we have no budget and we have no time. And we want to do some sort of done-in-a-day type audition. What can you do?”

So we said this is right up our alley. We created a really cool event – it was at the big Marriott Marquis in Times Square. We had around 500 contestants, and they all went through a timed audition process – stressful for them, but it was still fun.

They had to go through seed interviews and get in front of cameras. They had to get in front of a boardroom of judges and do presentations. At the end of the day, we ended up with 100 trainers that worked at Mt. Sinai to help roll out the hospital’s Epic training and go-live.

So that’s really the model of Big Break. We created it as a solution for Mt. Sinai, and now other folks are getting the word about it. Ochsner Health System is our next one. We’ve got the Big Break event for them in just a couple of weeks (January 21).

Did they reach out to you?
A consultant and dear friend of mine that was actually helping them with their system selection and project planning for their Epic implementation recommended this business model, and brought us in as the vendor to run this product for them. So yes, they did reach out to us, but it was really a consultant that made it happen.

Are you an all-Epic recruiting firm?
At the moment, that’s just about all we’re doing. Through the years, we’ve worked with many other products – with McKesson, Cerner, Siemens. The demand right now is Epic, so by default we’re doing all Epic. That’s just where the demand is, and so that’s where we’re spending our time.

How have you seen this type of program impact sponsoring hospitals and surrounding communities?
We think it’s a business model that works very well for hospitals. It’s a very low-cost way to get good resources. It’s also a good marketing opportunity for them to promote the fact they’re installing an electronic health record to the benefit of their patients, and it’s a great way for them to reinvest in their own community.

At Ochsner, the idea is that this is really for the New Orleans community. They don’t like to hire outside consultants. They really want to empower and revitalize their own community.

Many of the folks that we worked with at Mt. Sinai have gone on to work at other places. Big Break was really their footprint in the door. The end result is that the consultants that come through with really good experiences.  Over 50 percent of them are now working in the industry. Mt. Sinai actually hired four full-time employees. There was a big project up in Rochester, N.Y., that a lot of the people went to after that first project. We redeployed probably 20 of them on several go-lives.

Is there an opportunity for this to work in other cities?
At our very first meeting with Ochsner’s project executive, we talked about the fact that there are several area hospitals in and around New Orleans gearing up for Epic implementations. Our original thought was, let’s do this together, but the go-live timeframes didn’t work.

It would make perfect sense if there were multiple hospitals that could do the event together, do the credentialing together, and then take people from a generic credentialing and deploy them to the individual hospitals to learn the individual builds. I think it’s a model that could be a really good collaboration.

I think one of the neatest things about Big Break is that this industry is so thin on the amount of really good resources that are out there. It’s a great way to breed new talent