Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

EHR Error Messages – Fun Friday

Posted on September 21, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Sometimes these Fun Friday series of humorous blog posts hit a little too close to home. I’m pretty sure this week’s post will feel a little too personal for many readers. However, when I saw it, I couldn’t help but laugh and so I thought many of you might enjoy the humor as well. First, read the error message that Dr. Hayes share and then his question in the tweet below.

The nice thing is that most EHR are moving to the cloud. You don’t get this message in the cloud. Instead, you get 404 error messages and spinning wheels. Ok, you may never get away from these messages.

Have a great weekend and may you enjoy a weekend free of error messages like this.

Don’t Be The Last Practice To “Get” Digital Health

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Physicians, are you savvy about the digital health technologies your patients use? Do you make it easy for them to interact with you digitally and share the health data they generate? If not, you need to move ahead and get there already. While you may be satisfied with sidestepping the whole subject, patients aren’t, a recent report suggests.

As you probably know already a growing number of patients, most notably millennials, are integrating digital health tools into their everyday lives.

Research from Rock Health, which surveyed about 4,000 consumers, found that the share of respondents using at least one digital tool (such as telemedicine, digital health tracking apps or wearables) hit 87% last year. To get a sense of how impressive this is, bear in mind that just five years ago, only a tiny handful of consumers had given any of these tools a try.

What’s also of note is that some of these consumers were willing to skip insurance and pay out of pocket for digital care. One particularly clear example of this involves live video telemedicine; Sixty-nine percent of consumers who paid out of pocket for such consults said they were “extremely satisfied” with the experience.

Patients who reported having a chronic health condition seemed less likely to use digital tools to track their health metrics. Case in point: When it came to blood pressure tracking, just 11% captured this data with a digital app or journal. However, this may reflect the higher-than-average of those diagnosed with elevated pressures, a senior population with a lower level of tech sophistication.

Lest all of this sound intimidating, there’s at least some good news here. Apparently, a full 86% of respondents said that they’d be willing to share data with their physician, a much larger share than those who would exchange data with a health plan (58%) or pharmacy (52%). In other words, they trust you, which is a big asset under these circumstances.

If you want to dive into digital health more deeply, here’s a few obvious places to start:

  • Link in-person and telemedicine visits: Rock Health found that a whopping 92% pf respondents who had an in-person visit first were satisfied with their video visit.
  • Be vigilant about data security: Almost 9 out of 10 consumers participating in the survey said that they would be willing to share data with you. Don’t lose that trust to a health data breach; it will be hard if not impossible to get it back.
  • Bring chronically-ill seniors on board: While this group may not be terribly inclined to digitize their healthcare, doing so can help you treat them more effectively, so you’ll probably want to make that point up front.

Like it or not, wearables, fitness bands, mobile health apps, and other digital health tools have arrived. It’s no longer a matter of if you take advantage of them, but when and how. Don’t be the last practice in your neighborhood that just doesn’t get it.

It’s Time To Work Together On Technology Research

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Bloggers like myself see a lot of data on the uptake of emerging technologies. My biggest sources are market research firms, which typically provide the 10,000-foot view of the technology landscape and broad changes the new toys might work in the healthcare industry. I also get a chance to read some great academic research, primarily papers focused on niche issues within a subset of health IT.

I’m always curious to see which new technologies and applications are rising to the top, and I’m also intrigued by developments in emerging sub-disciplines such as blockchain for patient data security.

However, I’d argue that if we’re going to take the next hill, health IT players need to balance research on long-term adoption trends with a better understanding of how clinicians actually use new technologies. Currently, we veer between the micro and macro view without looking at trends in a practical manner.

Let’s consider the following information I gathered from a recent report from market research firm Reaction Data.   According to the report, which tabulated responses from a survey of about 100 healthcare leaders, five technologies seem to top the charts as being set to work changes in healthcare.

The list is topped by telemedicine, which was cited by 29% of respondents, followed by artificial intelligence (20%), interoperability (15%), data analytics (13%) and mobile data (11%).

While this data may be useful to leaders of large organizations in making mid- to long-range plans, it doesn’t offer a lot of direction as to how clinicians will actually use the stuff. This may not be a fatal flaw, as it is important to have some idea what trends are headed, but it doesn’t do much to help with tactical planning.

On the flip side, consider a paper recently published by a researcher with Google Brain, the AI team within Google. The paper, by Google software engineer Peter Lui, describes a scheme in which providers could use AI technology to speed their patient documentation process.

Lui’s paper describes how AI might predict what a clinician will say in patient notes by digging into the content of prior notes on that patient. This would allow it to help doctors compose current notes on the fly.  While Lui seems to have found a way to make this work in principle, it’s still not clear how effective his scheme would be if put into day-to-day use.

I’m well aware that figuring out how to solve a problem is the work of vendors more than researchers. I also know that vendors may not be suited to look at the big picture in the way of outside market researcher firms can, or to conduct the kind of small studies the fuel academic research.

However, I think we’re at a moment in health IT that demands high-level research collaboration between all of the stakeholders involved.  I truly hate the word “disruptive” by this point, but I wouldn’t know how else to describe options like blockchain or AI. It’s worth breaking down a bunch of silos to make all of these exciting new pieces fit together.

2019 CPT Codes To Cover Remote Monitoring And Digital Care Coordination

Posted on September 10, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The American Medical Association has released CPT code set changes 2019, and among them are some new options specific to digital health practices.

While providing such codes is a no-brainer — and if anything, the AMA is late to the party – it’s still a bit of noteworthy news, as it could have an impact on the progress of digital care.  After all, the new codes to make it easier to capture the value of some activities providers may be self-funding at present. They can also help physicians track the amount of time they spend on remote monitoring and digital care coordination more easily.

The 2019 release includes 335 changes to the existing code set, such as new and revised codes for adaptive behavior analysis, skin biopsy and central nervous system assessments. The new release also includes five new digital care-related codes.

The 2019 code set includes three new remote patient monitoring codes meant to capture how clinicians connect with patients at home and gather data from care management and coordination, and two new “interprofessional” Internet consult codes for reporting on care coordination discussions between a consulting physician and the treating physician

It’s good to see the AMA follow up with this issue. To date, there have been few effective ways to capture the benefits of interactive care online or even via email exchanges between physician and patient.

As a result, providers have been trapped in a vicious circle in which virtual care doesn’t get documented adequately, payers don’t reimburse because they don’t have the data needed to evaluate its effectiveness and providers don’t keep offering such services because they don’t get paid for performing them.

With the emergence of just five new CPT codes, however, things could begin to change for the better. For example, if physicians are getting paid to consult digitally with their peers on patient care, that gives vendors incentives to support these activities with better technology. This, in turn, can produce better results. Now we’re talking about a virtuous circle instead.

Obviously, it will take a lot more codes to document virtual care processes adequately. The introduction of these five new codes represents a very tentative first step at best. Still, it’s good to see the AMA avoid the chicken-and egg-problem and simply begin to lay the tracks for better-documented digital care. We’ve got to start somewhere.

 

Patient Directed Health Data Exchange on The Blockchain

Posted on September 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been friends with Dr. Tom Giannulli who most of you will probably have known as the CMO of Kareo. I first met Dr. Tom back when he created what I would call the first iPad optimized EHR interface back when Dr. Tom was at Epocrates and before they sold that EHR to Kareo. Needless to say, Dr. Tom is the kind of guy that likes to sit on the cutting edge of technology and how it applies to healthcare. So, it was no surprise to me when he came to me with his patient directed health data exchange called PatientDirected.io which is built on the blockchain.

While a lot of people talk about blockchain and theories about how blockchain could help healthcare, a lot of what people were doing was just talk. What I like about Dr. Tom and PatientDirected.io is that they just put out a video demo of a patient chart being requested from Kareo by the patient and then the patient sending that chart to Epic. Check it out to see what I mean:

Many of you that watch this demo might be asking. How is this on the blockchain? That’s one of the things that many people don’t understand about blockchain. If it’s done right, you won’t know anything about the blockchain. However, the blockchain can do things like creating smart contracts with providers which can create trusted connections. The blockchain is distributed, so your data isn’t stored on a central server that’s owned and controlled by PatientDirected.io. Basically, blockchain has a number of benefits, but it’s the “Intel Inside” and so it’s not something you should see as an end user, but it could provide some great benefits.

I also like that PatientDirected.io isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel. They’re using trusted third party applications like Verato to handle their master patient index and for verifying patients identity. There’s a lot more to explore when it comes to identity management, but it’s smart to work with companies that are doing this all across healthcare.

I was also impressed with the detailed sharing permissions that were available in PatientDirected.io. At first glance, a part of me wonders if it’s too complex for most patients. However, as long as the options are there, the interface can adapt to allow for specific patient preferences when it comes to data sharing. Of course, it’s nice that all of the sharing of this data will be tracked on the blockchain.

The key to all of this working for me is the integration with the EHR vendor. It looks like it’s using Direct to handle the messaging to the EHR vendor and back. This is good because I believe all certified EHR (which is pretty much all of them) have direct messaging built in. Some have integrated it better than others, but they all have this capability. My big concern with it though is whether what’s being shared by EHR vendors using Direct is enough data. And will that data that gets sent from one EHR to another appear in a format that’s useful to the receiving physician? If it’s not, then it doesn’t solve much of anything. Plus, I wonder what happens when a doctor gets a record request and doesn’t respond. This is especially true for EHR vendors who haven’t integrated Direct into the core EHR workflow. Will this take a culture change to not leave patients waiting for records that will never come?

As you could imagine, PatientDirected.io has an ICO offering on StartEngine.com. Looks like it just got started, but there’s an opportunity to buy their tokens if you’re interested and believe they’re on to something special.

I think there is a space for a patient directed health information exchange assuming we can make the exchange of information between disparate providers very simple. There are still some challenges for patients when it comes to getting access to their health information, but the law is clear that patients should have access to their health information. Now we just need the user interfaces to be as simple as clicking a button like is demonstrated in the video above and we’ll see much more patient directed health information exchange.

The Ambulatory EHR Market with Raul Villar, Jr. CEO of AdvancedMD

Posted on September 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The ambulatory EHR market is near to my heart since that’s where I started when I entered this world of healthcare IT. My first job was implementing an EHR in a small ambulatory practice. As regular readers know, I’ve commented on how the independent small practice is in trouble. I’m not suggesting this is what I’d like to happen or what should happen, but there are certainly a lot of challenging pressures on small practices.

Along with these pressures, the ambulatory EHR market is extremely different today than it was 5-10 years ago. The $36 billion funded meaningful use era of EHR adoption was what I call the golden age of EHR. We could argue whether it was a golden calf or not, but from a market standpoint, the meaningful use money fueled adoption of the EHR.

Today’s ambulatory EHR market is very different. That’s why we were excited to sit down with Raul Villar, Jr. CEO of AdvancedMD to talk about his perspective on the ambulatory EHR market. We also talk with him about the evolution of AdvancedMD as it went from ownership by ADP to now being owned by Marlin Equity Partners and what those changes mean for their customers. Plus, we go over AdvancedMD’s acquisition of NueMD and what their strategy is behind the acquisition. Finally, we talk about EHR vendors as a platform and where he sees AdvancedMD taking their platform in the future.

If you’re interested in the ambulatory EHR market or in AdvancedMD, you’ll enjoy this interview with Raul Villar, Jr.

If you enjoyed this video interview, be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and watch all of our healthcare IT interviews.

AI-Based Tech Could Speed Patient Documentation Process

Posted on August 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A researcher with a Google AI team, Google Brain, has published a paper describing how AI could help physicians complete patient documentation more quickly. The author, software engineer Peter Lui, contends that AI technology can speed up patient documentation considerably by predicting its content.

On my initial reading of the paper, it wasn’t clear to me what advantage this has over pre-filling templates or even allowing physicians to cut-and-paste text from previous patient encounters. Still, judge for yourself as I outline what author Liu has to say, and by all means, check out the write-up.

In its introduction, the paper notes that physicians spend a great deal of time and energy entering patient notes into EHRs, a process which is not only taxing but also demoralizing for many physicians. Choosing from just one of countless data points underscoring this conclusion, Liu cites a 2016 study noting that physicians spend almost 2 hours of administrative work for every hour of patient contact.

However, it might be possible to reduce the number of hours doctors spend on this dreary task. Google Brain has been working on technologies which can speed up the process of documentation, including a new medical language modeling approach. Liu and his colleagues are also looking at how to represent an EHR’s mix of structured and unstructured text data.

The net of all of this? Google Brain has been able to create a set of systems which, by drawing on previous patient records can predict most of the content a physician will use next time they see that patient.

The heart of this effort is the MIMIC-III dataset, which contains the de-identified electronic health records of 39,597 patients from the ICU of a large tertiary care hospital. The dataset includes patient demographic data, medications, lab results, and notes written by providers. The system includes AI capabilities which are “trained” to predict the text physicians will use in their latest patient note.

In addition to making predictions, the Google Brain AI seems to have been able to pick out some forms of errors in existing notes, including patient ages and drug names, as well as providing autocorrect options for corrupted words.

By way of caveats, the paper warns that the research used only data generated within 24 hours of the current note content. Liu points out that while this may be a wide enough range of information for ICU notes, as things happen fast there, it would be better to draw on data representing larger windows of time for non-ICU patients. In addition, Liu concedes that it won’t always be possible to predict the content of notes even if the system has absorbed all existing documentation.

However, none of these problems are insurmountable, and Liu understandably describes these results as “encouraging,” but that’s also a way of conceding that this is only an experimental conclusion. In other words, these predictive capabilities are not a done deal by any means. That being said, it seems likely that his approach could be valuable.

I am left with at least one question, though. If the Google Brain technology can predict physician notes with great fidelity, how does that differ than having the physician cut-and-paste previous notes on their own?  I may be missing something here, because I’m not a software engineer, but I’d still like to know how these predictions improve on existing workarounds.

HPV Surveillance Project Reminds Us Why HIEs Still Matter

Posted on August 24, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

When healthcare organizations use EHR data to improve care or streamline processes, it seems like an obvious way to go. There are many benefits to doing so – certainly far more than I could cover in a single story—and odds of finding better ways to leverage such data further keep increasing over time.

Given the attention commercial EHR data use gets, it’s easy to forget the role of such data in improving public health. Yes, medical practices need to meet criteria that converge with public health objectives, such as managing diabetes and its side effects. And of course, population health management efforts directly mirror and sometimes overlap with public health goals. But it’s seldom the work of which rockstars are made.

However, given that the bulk of efforts have typically been spearheaded by government agencies or independent non-profits in the past, it’s a good idea to keep track of what they’re doing, especially if you’re wondering what else you can do with patient health data. It’s even more important to remember that even a cache of regional health data can be very valuable in supporting community health.

I was thinking about this recently when the following story turned up in my inbox.  On the surface, it’s not a big deal, but it’s the kind of cooperative effort that can improve community health in ways that work for everyone in healthcare.

This story looks at the kind of data harvesting exercise that flies under the radar of most providers. It describes an HPV surveillance effort, the HPV Vaccine Impact Monitoring Project (HPV-IMPACT), which is sponsored by the CDC and implemented by the Center for Community Health and Prevention at the University of Rochester.

The HPV-IMPACT project is relying in part on data by the Rochester RHIO, which is sharing anonymized patient health information collected between 2008 to 2014. The researchers are also using data from California, Connecticut, Oregon and Tennessee.

The goal of HPV-IMPACT is to identify trends such as changes in the percentage of women screened for HPV, the implications for different age groups and overall test outcomes. Once they complete this analysis, research will use it to determine whether HPV incidence rates can be attributed to vaccine use or alternatively, decreases in detection.

While this kind of project is bread-and-butter research, something that won’t ever make headlines in medical journals, it deserves some thought.

With things being as they are, it’s easy to dismiss HIEs as parts of a broken national interoperability effort. Hey, I’ve been as guilty of this as anyone. For many years, I waited for the HIE model today, in part because it just didn’t seem to be a sustainable business model, but at least some just kept on chuggin’.

As it turns out, regional HIEs aren’t abandonware — they just have their own niche. This kind of story reminds me that even limited health data collection efforts can make a difference. Keep up the good work, folks.

The Latest Look At How Physicians Share PHI Electronically

Posted on August 22, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Over the last several years, I’ve read many a report on physicians’ sharing of health data. The key metrics most observers use to measure these efforts are how often physicians send and receive data and what type of data they’re sending.

I’m not so sure that this measurement offers the best look at health data sharing. I’m more interested in what doctors do with the information than what they shared and received. My guess is that these reports measure PHI coming and going because it’s simply more practical and does offer at least some insight.

In that spirit, I present to you some numbers from the CDC’s National Health Statistics Reports. That data comes from the 2015 National Electronic Health Records Survey, a nationally-representative survey of nonfederal office-based physicians. The study estimates the types PHI doctors electronically sent, searched for, received and integrated.

Survey results included the following:

  • Among physicians who sent PHI electronically, the most common types of data sent were referrals (67.9%), laboratory results (67.2%) and medication lists (65.1%). The least commonly observed types were summary of care records (51.5%), registry data (55.9%) and imaging reports (56.6%).
  • When these physicians received PHI, the most common types the study found were laboratory results (78.8%), imaging (60.8%) and medication lists (54.4%). The types seen least often included ED notifications (34.5%), hospital discharge summaries (42.5%) and registry data (43.2%).
  • For physicians who integrated PHI electronically, the most commonly observed types were laboratory results (73.2%), imaging reports (49.8%) and hospital discharge summaries (48.7%). PHI least commonly integrated included registry data (30.9%), problem lists (32.7%) and medication allergy lists (36.1%).
  • The most common reasons physicians searched for PHI electronically were to find medication lists (90.2%), medication allergy lists (88.2%) and hospital discharge summaries (80.4%), followed by imaging reports (58.9%), laboratory results (48.5%) and problem lists (41.2%).

The CDC analysis of this data notes that it might be smart to articulate the differences between primary care PHI exchange and specialist PHI exchange. It rightfully points out that research which breaks down such data not only by specialty, but also office setting, practice size and EHR vendor would be a good idea.

These aren’t the only issues left unaddressed, though. What strikes me about this data is that there’s little symmetry between what doctors send and what they receive. There’s also little overlap between the sharing stats and those regarding what they integrate. Their priorities when searching for information seem to be on their own track as well.

What does this mean? It’s hard to tell. But I think someone should look at the differences in how doctors participate in various forms of electronic exchange of PHI. These differences probably say something, and it would be nice to know what it is.

 

 

Physician Revolt Against EHRs – Unlikely to Happen

Posted on August 20, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Physicians hate EHRs.

Yes, there are a few exceptions, but it’s pretty rare to find a physician that loves their EHR. There are a fair number of them that are apathetic towards their EHR, but there are a lot of doctors who hate them.

How much do they hate them? That’s hard to say, but it seems clear that they don’t hate them enough to really change things. Sure, they’ll leave some comments on message boards, send out some tweets or write some blogs, but they don’t seem ready to take it to the board (even when they’re the board). The most common path is doctors hate the EHR when it’s first implemented and then they learn the EHR software and become apathetic.

Clay Forsberg recently laid out the strategy for doctors who hate their EHR and want change:

Clay makes a great point. He then extends the discussion with these tweets:

The real problem here is that EHRs are the epitome of “meh.” They get in the way, but it’s hard to draw a specific line between EHR software and deaths or really poor quality care. They cause some time issues with multiple logins and lots of clicks, but they also save time in other ways. They have some bad workflows, but they make some workflows better.

EHRs are just good enough to avoid a revolt.

Plus, a doctor replying to Clay Forsberg’s tweet above identified another issue:

Doctors definitely don’t want to risk their livelihood, but I think even more than that they don’t think that complaints about the EHR are going to have any impact. This is particularly true in large health systems. As Clay Forsberg points out, one voice will likely fall on deaf ears. It would take a coordinated effort to really effect change.

I’d also add that the problem I’ve seen with those doctors that are complaining about EHR software aren’t doing it in a productive manner. It’s almost like these people are arguing that we should go back to paper. Let’s be honest. That’s not going to happen. Plus, they don’t acknowledge how much they hated paper either. Think about something as simple as a missing chart and that usually refreshes some of the memories. Let alone the stacks of paper charts on physician’s desks that still needed to be completed.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not suggesting that EHRs couldn’t do a lot more to make physicians’ lives easier. There’s also a ton of poorly optimized EHR implementations that are driving doctors crazy. Those are fixable even if many doctors don’t realize that there are solutions out there. It’s important to realize that both are issues, but are addressed very differently.

At the end of the day, doctors can complain about EHR software until their blue in the face, but EHRs aren’t going anywhere. We’re not going back to paper and I don’t see an alternative to them coming soon. That said, a physician revolt against EHRs would make them better and that would be a great thing for everyone involved. I just don’t see enough doctors ready to revolt. Do you? If so, I’d love to hear what they’re doing.