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Healthcare IT Job Satisfaction – Fun Friday

Posted on February 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and so as we head into the weekend it’s time for some fun. This is especially needed with HIMSS only 10 days away. This first cartoon hits on the impact of technology on our health, but also on the impact of EHR and technology on doctors. Especially healthcare IT software with really bad UIs. You know what I’m talking about.

And this one for my coffee loving friends:

EMR-Based Alert System Can Identify Possible Child Abuse Victims

Posted on February 21, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Sometimes, it’s pretty easy for a physician to tell that a child might be experiencing physical abuse at home. However, sometimes physicians are rushed and may not do an adequate screening for abuse, the signs of which aren’t always available at first glance.

However, a group of researchers has developed an algorithm, drawing on patient records in the EMR, which it says can improve screening rates for physical abuse and identify such cases earlier.

The project, the write-up of which appears in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, coded triggers to identify children less than two years old at risk for physical abuse into the EMR using a freestanding pediatric hospital with a level 1 trauma center. The researchers embedded 30 age-specific triggers in the EMR.

During the test, the system ran a “silent mode,” in which study personnel saw data on children whose clinical symptoms triggered the alert system but physicians did not. During the period between October 21, 2014 through April 6, 2015, 226 children triggered the alert, the mean age of whom was 6.5 months.

During the pilot the system detected 98.5% of children less than two years of age with signs of probable or definite child abuse, according to the study authors.

If these algorithms are that successful in identifying at-risk children, one would hope that the system moves from pilot to widespread rollout fairly soon. In theory, the system should help clinicians who encounter children in potential danger, especially ones presenting with serious injuries in the emergency department, be better prepared to identify these children and take appropriate action.

Ultimately, this study suggests that even if such clinicians are alert and careful, triggers generated by an EMR might be more effective at detecting these cases. After all, while clinicians must juggle multiple patients in an extremely hectic environment, especially in the ED, EMRs don’t get tired and they don’t need to check a signs and symptoms list manually to detect signs of trouble.

Of course, while these triggers can be very helpful in investigating signs of abuse, clinicians would be ill-advised to rely on them entirely, as there’s no substitute for experience and medical judgment. Also, there’s always a risk that adding another alert to the cacophony of existing alerts could lead to it going unnoticed. Still, it seems certain that if nothing else, this is a promising approach to protecting children from harm.

Most Health Organizations Now Integrating SDOH Into Pop Health Management Programs

Posted on February 20, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new survey has found that healthcare organizations have begun to actively integrate social determinants of health into the population health management strategies.

The research, conducted by Change Healthcare and the HealthCare Executive Group, found that 80% of organizations had begun to track and use data on social determinants. This is a huge step up from just a few years ago, when discussions around SDOH and their use in population health management were more speculative than practical.

Perhaps the most interesting technique organizations are using is enlisting doctors in this effort. About 21% are training doctors to identify social determinants, a step which, in my opinion, is long overdue. Given how taxing this might be for physicians at first, it’s good to see that just a hair under 21% have also rolled out point-of-care checklists designed to help clinicians identify potential social determinants.

Other strategies respondents are using to leverage SDOH info include integrating community programs and resources into their population health management programs (42%), integrating medical data with financial, census and geographic data (34%), offering social assessment tools with health risk assessments (33%), incorporating social determinants into the clinical workflow (27 percent) and using third-party software, data and/or services (19%).

On a side note, the research data also suggests that another set of tools in PHM — mobile and digital health technologies — haven’t found their footing. When asked what’s limiting widespread consumer adoption of these tools, top reasons respondents cited included security and privacy concerns (49%), limited functionality (35%), a duplicative, redundant and confusing app environment (34%), problems with system interoperability (33%), a lack of healthcare literacy (33%) and poor user interface design (32%).

The latter data pointing to low mobile/digital health adoption came as a surprise to me. I like to think I can see through health IT industry hype, but maybe I’ve been fooled somehow. The data I’ve seen to date (some of it, admittedly, collected by vendors) has suggested for years that mobile healthcare adoption was climbing dramatically and that more recently, other digital health tools have begun to follow suit. I guess I missed something.

Given this lag, I’m glad to see that healthcare organizations are enlisting physicians, point-of-care checklists, clinical integration and other tactics to make use of SDOH data. We all know on a gut level that if the patient can’t get to the doctor, lacks social support or lives in a “food desert” where finding unprocessed foods and healthy produce may be quite difficult, preaching at them about their health concerns isn’t going to help. It’s high time we help physicians collect this information and find ways to close some of these gaps.

The Role of Practice Automation in Healthcare Communication

Posted on February 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Naveen Sarabu, Vice President of Product Management, AdvancedMD.

Practice automation was born out of the demand for quicker, more efficient manual processes. One of these manual processes is getting back to basics by using plain, old-fashioned communication – whether among members of a healthcare team, or between a physician and patient. Through automation we seek to deliver the right data to the right people exactly when they need it for the optimal provision of care. Likewise, we also seek to cut down on the manual processes that bog us down and add complexity. Many ambulatory practices struggle to find a solution that meets the complex demands of treating patients. Many admit that communication remains one of their greatest struggles – and miscommunication is one of the biggest frustrations for patients.

Doctors’ offices and hospital counterparts in the U.S. have shouldered $1.7 billion in malpractice costs due to poor communication—that’s 30 percent of all malpractice cases.

Automating manual processes of a physician practice enables the distribution of vital patient information in a fast, efficient, and accurate way. By leveraging an integrated physician-patient workflow system, physicians gain benefits of both accuracy and time in the sharing of clinical and billing information. This defines the next generation of the EHR: managing patient data among systems with authentic, automated data transfer and overall ease of use.

Task-based challenges

In a sense, many elements of communication, or information transfer points, are categorized as “tasks” by physicians. Obviously, every doctor in every office has his or her own way of organizing to-do’s. Rigid or cookie-cutter solutions can be more trouble than they’re worth for the busy ambulatory practice. The sheer volume of tasks and relentlessness of practice-specific workflow elements remain a huge burden to physicians and staff members. Without a straightforward means to categorize and execute frequently performed tasks such as prescriptions, refills, charge slips, notes, and orders, action items can fall through the cracks and leave room for errors.

Practices can address this by selecting flexible and customizable solutions that spell out all the moving parts of a practice and put them at the physician’s fingertips, much like an automated workflow analyst would. Visual tools like dashboards are helpful in presenting all tasks in a single snapshot, allowing physicians to manage to-do’s quickly and with ease to execute and communicate what must come next. Patient cards organized by specialty and workflow give physicians a snapshot of what’s really most important in a given moment. An integrated EHR dashboard not only helps physicians negotiate high-priority tasks of significant volume, it orients them to the vital patient information required for sound decision-making.

Impact of physician mobility on communication

A key asset of running a fully-automated ambulatory practice is the feasibility of team members accessing the same systems in real time, from any location. This has multiple benefits, including improved communication accuracy and workflow efficiencies.

“Many different user types [in my practice] from the nurse, to the office manager, to the biller, are all working with the same data on the same platform with real-time access. The seamless continuity is what I like about it,” said Larry J. Winikur, MD, pain management physician in Danville, Va.

Physician mobility is achieved through cloud-based technology and allows providers and staff members to communicate seamlessly from several practice locations: a home office, a patient’s home, the hospital or while traveling. It helps physicians respond to patient and staff messages quickly and stay on top of pressing work issues no matter where they are, preventing a backlog of tasks once they return onsite.

Surgical Specialists of Jackson (Miss.), treats more than 500 active patients, including those in rural areas. According to office manager Kristen Humphrey, having mobile capabilities as a result of complete practice automation has improved the quality of care the practice provides to patients. “When we have a physician seeing patients an hour away in a rural county, he takes the iPad and is able to log into the patients’ medical record and get any information he needs,” leveraging a seamless connectivity to the practice from our office in Jackson. “It makes life really easy,” Humphrey says.

Remote access also offers the feasibility of treating patients with video-based telemedicine, during hospital rounding, or home or hospice care. EHR mobile access is, without a doubt, a top priority for busy practices as they build out the future of their business.

The building blocks of patient engagement

As practices compete with other practices and larger health systems to secure and retain patients, these patients have developed a consumer-like healthcare mentality. Most patients want as much information about their condition as possible, so they can take a proactive role in their care. Patients want to engage with their physicians, by communicating openly and regularly about options and treatment decisions.

A fully-automated ambulatory practice utilizes patient engagement tools to secure satisfaction, retention, and referrals. Consider the ease with which patients can make appointments – online self-scheduling is a critical piece of functionality. Automated check-in tools such as an iPad kiosk are especially favorable to patients who can complete intake and consent forms electronically, eliminating the possibility of transcription errors that occur when data is transferred from paper to digital. A robust patient portal enables physicians to communicate with patients privately and efficiently; to share educational materials or share lab results.

Appointment reminders can also serve as simple communication tools that enhance not only the patient experience, but also the practice bottom line.

Dr. Winikur utilized a patient reminder system to help decrease costly no-show appointments in his busy schedule. The solution helped engage patients and reduced no-shows at his practice from about 12 percent to approximately two percent of appointments, which positively impacts his revenue.

The mobility benefits previously mentioned also allow physicians to demonstrate superior attention to patient needs. “I can pull up patient information no matter where I am in the world with internet access,” Winikur says. When patients receive a quick and effective response to inquiry, they perceive their doctor is in the office (even if he’s not!), which helps increase patient satisfaction.

Other important automated tools include post-visit surveys that enable patients to provide honest, timely feedback about the care they’ve received. These surveys can also trigger patients to post positive experiences to Google and social media outlets. In the event of a negative experience, patients can first communicate privately with the practice to resolve any potential problem or miscommunication.

The bottom line

In today’s competitive healthcare climate, patients have many options for their care. Practices that transition to cloud-based technology platforms with fully automated and customizable workflow elements show greater respect to the needs and time of their patients, increase revenues, and place greater value on their own needs and time. They also prove to be on the cutting edge of technology by streamlining processes and enhancing communication to deliver safer and more accurate care.

About Naveen Sarabu
Naveen Sarabu is Vice President of Product Management at AdvancedMD. Naveen has more than 15 years of experience developing innovative healthcare software solutions for the ambulatory, acute and accountable care organization (ACO) markets, including for Allscripts, Hill-Rom, and NTT DATA. Naveen received an MBA from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and an undergraduate degree from National Institute of Technology, Warangal, India.

Are EMR Clicks the Problem? – Deep Thought Thursday

Posted on February 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I agree with David Chou here when it comes to needing to make EMRs easier. However, I don’t believe reducing the number of clicks is the real issue. Clicks are just a symptom of the real problem. The real problem is regulations and reimbursement requirements that need revision and simplification.

If we simplified regulations and reimbursement requirements, EHRs would be significantly more usable and would require fewer clicks.

The next question you should ask yourself is whether this administrative simplification will happen first or whether the technology will evolve to the point where it can automatically document the patient visit to any level of complexity while not disrupting the physician workflow.

Where’s your bet? On government and payer changes? Or on technology?

My bets on technology even if Seema Verma, CMS Administrator, is calling for administrative simplification. However, we’re certainly not there yet on either front.

There’s a Disturbance in the Force We Know as MACRA

Posted on February 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday Anne Zieger wrote about AAFP’s proposals to reduce the EHR Administrative Burdens and then we got this tweet from CMS Administrator Seema Verma:

That’s some really strong language from the CMS Director.

If you care about this topic, you should go and read all of Seema Verma’s tweets, but here are two more for those who don’t want to read them all:

Change is in the air it seems. Many providers are rejoicing if you look through the replies to Seema Verma’s tweets.

Dr. Ronald Hirsch asked the question that I’m sure many doctors were asking:

The short answer is no MACRA and MIPS aren’t going away. If my understanding of policy is right, Seema Verma doesn’t have the authority to make MACRA go away. That would take actions from Congress and I don’t know anyone holding their breath on that one. However, Seema can streamline the way MACRA and MIPS are implemented to make it much easier for doctors. That seems to be what’s happening now.

What will this mean for the future of MACRA? I don’t think anyone knows the answers to that question. However, what does seem clear from these tweets is that change is in the air. We’ll have to wait and see what those changes are and who influences the changes they make.

What do you think this means for MACRA and MIPS? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

AAFP Proposes Tactics For Reducing EHR Administrative Burdens

Posted on February 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The American Academy of Family Physicians has proposed a series of approaches it says will reduce the administrative burdens EHRs impose on primary care doctors.

The recommendations, which come in the form of a letter to CMS, address health IT simplification, prior authorization and standardization of quality measurement. However, the letter leads off with EHR concerns and much of the content is focused on making physician IT use easier.

Few would argue that the average physician spends too much time struggling with EHR-related administrative work. The AAFP backs this assertion up with a couple of studies, including one finding that primary care physicians spend almost 6 hours per day interacting with EHRs. It also cites research concluding that four types of specialist spent almost 2 hours using the EHR for every hour of direct patient care.

To address these concerns, the AAFP recommends taking the following steps:

  • Eliminating HIT utilization measures in MIPS: The group argues that such measures are not needed anymore now that MIPS includes quality, cost and practice improvement measures.
  • Updating documentation requirements: With the agency’s Evaluation and Management recommendation guidelines having been developed 20 years ago, prior to the widespread use of EHRs, it’s time to rethink their use, the letter asserts. Today, the group says, they have a negative impact on EHR usability and hinder interoperability. The group recommends eliminating documentation requirements for codes 99211-99215 and 99201-99205 entirely and allowing any care team member to enter medical information.
  • Rethinking data exchange policies: The AAFP is asking CMS and ONC to focus on how and when data is exchanged rather than demanding that specific data types be included. The group also urges CMS and ONC to penalize healthcare organizations not appropriately sharing information, using its authority granted by the 21st Century Cures Act.
  • Creating standardized clinical data models: To share data effectively across the healthcare ecosystem, the AAFP argues, it’s necessary to develop nationally-recognized, consistent data models that can be used to share data efficiently. It recommends that such principles be developed by physicians and other clinicians rather than policymakers, vendors or engineers.

I don’t know about you, but I find much of this to be a no-brainer. Of course, the decades-old E/M guidelines need to be reformed, consistent data models must emerge if we hope to improve interoperability and physicians need to lead the charge.

Unfortunately, it’s hard to tell whether CMS and ONC are willing and prepared to listen to these recommendations. In theory, leaders at ONC should be only too glad to help providers achieve these goals and CMS should support their efforts. But given how obvious some of this is, it should have happened already. The fact that it hasn’t points up how hard all of this could be to pull off.

E-Patient Update: Alexa Nowhere Near Ready For Healthcare Prime Time

Posted on February 9, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Folks, I just purchased an Amazon Echo (Alexa) and I’ll tell you up front that I love it. I’m enjoying the heck out of summoning my favorite music with a simple voice command, ordering up a hypnotherapy session when my back hurts and tracking Amazon packages with a four-word request. I’m not sure all of these options are important but they sure are fun to use.

Being who I am, I’ve also checked out what, if anything, Alexa can do to address health issues. I tested it out with some simple but important comments related to my health. I had high hopes, but its performance turned out to be spotty. My statements included:

“Alexa, I’m hungry.”
“Alexa, I have a migraine.”
”Alexa, I’m lonely.”
”Alexa, I’m anxious.”
”Alexa, my chest hurts.”
“Alexa, I can’t breathe.”
“Alexa, I need help.”
“Alexa, I’m suicidal.”
“Alexa, my face is drooping.”

In running these informal tests, it became pretty clear what the Echo was and was not set up to do. In short, it offered brief but appropriate response to communications that involved conditions (such as experiencing suicidality) but drew a blank when confronted with some serious symptoms.

For example, when I told the Echo that I had a migraine, she (yes, it has a female voice and I’ve given it a gender) offered vague but helpful suggestions on how to deal with headaches, while warning me to call 911 if it got much worse suddenly. She also responded appropriately when I said I was lonely or that I needed help.

On the other hand, some of the symptoms I asked about drew the response “I don’t know about that.” I realize that Alexa isn’t a substitute for a clinician and it can’t triage me, but even a blanket suggestion that I call 911 would’ve been nice.

It’s clear that part of the problem is Echo’s reliance on “skills,” apps which seem to interact with its core systems. It can’t offer very much in the way of information or referral unless you invoke one of these skills with an “open” command. (The Echo can tell you a joke, though. A lame joke, but a joke nonetheless.)

Not only that, while I’m sure I missed some things, the selection of skills seems to be relatively minimal for such a prominent platform, particularly one backed by a giant like Amazon. That’s particularly true in the case of health-related skills. Visualize where chatbots and consumer-oriented AI were a couple of years ago and you’ll get the picture.

Ultimately, my guess is that physicians will prescribe Alexa alongside connected glucose meters, smart scales and the like, but not very soon. As my colleague John Lynn points out, information shared via the Echo isn’t confidential, as the Alexa isn’t HIPAA-compliant, and that’s just one of many difficulties that the healthcare industry will need to overcome before deploying this otherwise nifty device.

Still, like John, I have little doubt that the Echo and his siblings will eventually support medical practice in one form or another. It’s just a matter of how quickly it moves from an embryonic stage to a fully-fledged technology ecosystem linked with the excellent tools and apps that already exist.

Crypto Breach at Hospital, EHR Customization, and Some EHR Humor – Twitter Roundup

Posted on February 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It had been a while since we did a Twitter roundup. So many interesting, entertaining, and insightful things are shared. We decided to keep this one light but valuable. We hope you enjoy the Twitter roundup and some of our own added commentary.


Not sure this is the first, but certain it’s not the last. A lot of money to be made from cryptocurrency mining and hospitals have a lot of CPU that can be stolen to mine cryptocurrency. This is going to become a popular malware. It goes mostly hidden from site and so many organizations don’t even realize what’s happening.


If you’ve been part of an EHR implementation you know that Linda is right. However, there are some general lessons learned that are extremely valuable and help every implementation or now EHR optimization. The question I’d ask is, should EHR be standard?


I should have saved this for a Fun Frdiay post, but why not treat Wednesday like Friday. Some other replies to this tweet were just as hilarious (until you realize what they really mean):
If my patients went unresponsive as often as my EMR, I’d be a coroner. – @FredWuMD

Just spray a little epi into the USB port – @roto_tudor

Yes it would be like an episode of the resident. Multiple codes a day. @CaitlynMooneyMD

Three-Quarters Of Medical Practices Aren’t Getting Full Value From Their EHR

Posted on February 6, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Given how many EHRs seem to feature position-hostile designs, it’s hardly surprising to learn that many medical practices aren’t getting the most from them. However, I was taken aback by how deep this underutilization seems to run.

A new study appearing in the American Journal of Managed Care has concluded that a whopping 73% of practices weren’t using their EHRs to the fullest extent and that another 40% make little or no use of health IT functions. Even given the obstacles to using EHRs, this seems like a big waste of money, time and potential, doesn’t it?

To conduct the study, researchers used data from a relevant HIMSS Analytics survey. The data included responses from 30,123 ambulatory practices with an operational EHR in place, most with fewer than seven affiliated doctors in place.  Researchers sifted the data to determine the extent to which these practices were using EHR-based health IT functionalities.

Of course, some medical groups were on top of their game. Researchers found that 26.6% of practices could be classified as health IT super-users that squeezed every benefit from their systems. As you might guess, the likelihood that a practice was a super-user grew as the number of affiliate doctors increased, as well as when the practice was located in a metropolitan area. But far more groups seem to have fallen well behind the leaders.

According to the data, among practices using CPOE tools, only 36% used them for more than 75% of orders. Also, while groups commonly used basic functions such as data storage, with 100% of practices storing transcribed reports electronically and 61% using the EHR for nursing documentation, most lagged in other areas. For example, only 29% used tools allowing them to find and modified orders for all patients on a specific medication.

To address this gap, researchers say, policymakers should consider how to address the barriers PCP and specialist practices face in using the health IT tools more fully. Understanding how this disparity has emerged and how to address it is critical, they suggest, as less sophisticated use of EHRs may have an impact on care quality and also on groups’ ability to participate in community efforts such as HIEs.

The truth is, if the under-utilizer practices don’t get some kind of help or support, it’s unlikely they’ll step up their use of EHR functions. Particularly if they’ve had the system in place for a while, the workflow is baked into the system and physician habits established. Maybe the pressure to provide value-based care will do the trick, but it remains to be seen. This is a problem that won’t go away quickly.